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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 1:02am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 20/02/2015 - 1:01am
Story A Quick Look at Eight Recent Linux Kernel Releases Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:56pm
Story X.Org X Server Vulnerabilities Closed in Ubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:48pm
Story Lumina Desktop 0.8.2 Released! Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:45pm
Story A developer's guide to getting into open source Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:42pm
Story Introducing Future Studio, a Debian-Based OS Designed for Creative People Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:35pm
Story All Ubuntu Phones Are Now Sold Out, Says BQ on Twitter Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:31pm
Story Tiny, rugged, box-PC implements Intel’s IoT platform Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:31pm
Story Sony SmartWatch 3 review: Android Wear can be remarkably unremarkable Rianne Schestowitz 19/02/2015 - 7:26pm

Should open source boycott Cisco’s contest?

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: While lawyers debate the merits of the FSF’s suit against Cisco, open source developers may be asking themselves how they can make their views heard. Here’s an idea. Boycott Cisco’s contest.

10 things Linux Ubuntu should REALLY copy from Mac OS X

Filed under
Linux

grigio.org: Linux grows up less than Mac OS, Why? The most important reasons are: Mac still offers a better user experience (as Mark Shuttleworth admits) and not enought commercial software are avalaible for Linux. So, what is this "user experience" that Mac has and Linux lacks?

Is Phoenix about to Enter GPL Violation HyperSpace?

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: If ultraportables were last year's big surprise success for GNU/Linux, one of the potentially exciting technologies for this year is the instant-on pre-operating system that loads in seconds when you power up a desktop or portable. Does Phoenix hope to get away without respecting the GNU GPL?

Memo to Dell: Pump Ubuntu Into the Channel

Filed under
Ubuntu

workswithu.com: Pssst: Hey Greg Davis. You’ve just been named Dell’s global channel chief — in charge of the PC giant’s worldwide partner strategy. What are you going to do next? Here’s one suggestion:

Linux and Netbooks

Filed under
Linux
Hardware
  • When is a netbook no longer a netbook?

  • Linux and Netbooks
  • ARMing GNU/Linux Netbooks for Success in 2009
  • New Freescale processors target Linux netbooks
  • Notes from the netbook revolution

16 Free Games - Part 2

Filed under
Gaming

pcmech.com: Did you get your fill of games from part 1? We didn’t think so! So here’s part two.

Introducing KDE 4: Dragon and SMPlayer

Filed under
KDE
Software

introducingkde4.blogspot: Kaffeine was the most used Video Player on KDE 3, however, for KDE 4.x it's in a pretty early stage, but fear not, the SMPlayer (which is technically a Qt application, not a KDE one) and Dragon Player came to fill this hole.

End Game Piracy: Open Source

Filed under
OSS

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: As 2008 has proven - draconian digital restrictions management (DRM) does not stop people from illicitly using computer games. Spore, whose DRM was so bad they got ratings bombed on Amazon.com, was the most pirated game of 2008. The DRM caused hassles for legitimate users and did nothing to stop illicit use. This is always the case.

Turning Linux’s Advantages in to Advantages

Filed under
Linux

linuxloop.com: Linux’s key advantages, such as customizability, the repository system, hardware support, and excellent interfaces, are frequently viewed as downsides or deal-breakers to new users.

KDE4 performance on NVidia 8600GT: problem solved by bying ATI

Filed under
KDE
Hardware

adymo.blogspot: I've been running KDE4 desktop since May and I've constantly suffered from poor desktop performance and various graphics card related problems. Now I've solved those problems:

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • 5 Best Linux Distros to Convert Windows Users

  • Installing Games in Steam
  • KDE 4.2 [Beta 2] on openSUSE 11.1
  • LGP Launches PenguinPlay
  • Upgrading to Fedora 10
  • Using Wget's User Agent Option Safely
  • The Software Freedom Law Show Episode 0x04
  • Podcast, Novell’s John Dragoon
  • What OS for Your Netbook?
  • Virtualization Congress 2009: vote now for the Ulteo presentation
  • /bin/bash: bad interpreter: Text file busy Error and Solution
  • How the next openSUSE theme is chosen
  • How To Resize And Create Partitions With Gnome Partition Editor (GParted)
  • Blog from your Ubuntu Desktop
  • Open source trends
  • The difference a year makes
  • Linux Distro Review - BIG LINUX 4.2
  • Vietnam to Widely Use Open Source Software
  • How MIDs Are Complicating Mobile Linux Development
  • Super Hi-Fi Digital Audio in Linux

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 53

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #53 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Masim Sugianto: First Hackfest for Indonesian openSUSE Community, How to Make openSUSE 11.1 LiveUSB, and Joe Brockmeier: openSUSE - One of the 10 coolest of 2008.

Review of Circus Linux

Filed under
Gaming

ryanorser.com: Well, I am back from holidays and I wanted to get a game review in. The game I have decided to review is called Circus Linux.

Fedora, Two Weeks On

Filed under
Linux

bushweed.blogspot: After two weeks of using Fedora on a daily basis, i thought it important to give an overview. With any OS there are pros and cons. Fedora 10 is definitely no exception.

Song Parodies: Ubuntu's Full of User Guys

Filed under
Ubuntu
Humor

Ubuntu's full of user guys
Their forums are insane
Whenever a new distro's out
My question is the same

Opinion: Absolutism hurting Debian

Filed under
Linux

VC funding for open source: mixed messages from 2008

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: The figures for publicly disclosed venture capital funding in open source vendors during Q4 and FY08 are in and while the numbers themselves provide a mixed picture, the statistics don’t necessarily tell the full story.

Tools for Migrating from Windows to Linux

Filed under
Software

earthweb.com: Taking baby steps to become more familiar with a new operating system can be as simple as revamping the OS already in use on your computer. Here are some tips on utilizing different open source resources to make the goal of a full time switch over to Linux a lasting one:

16 Free Games - Part 1

Filed under
Gaming

pcmech.com: Here’s a list of free games you can get right now. Many of these games run on Windows, Mac OS X and/or Linux. All of them are ready for download and don’t cost a dime.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
  • Everything you knew about Chromebooks is wrong
    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more