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Friday, 29 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Profiling fedora 15 startup time srlinuxx 27/04/2011 - 2:43pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 27/04/2011 - 6:27am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 27/04/2011 - 6:17am
Blog entry storming srlinuxx 2 27/04/2011 - 6:05am
Story Breaking in a Kingston SSD srlinuxx 3 27/04/2011 - 4:23am
Story How Hardware Companies Determine Their Linux Base srlinuxx 27/04/2011 - 4:21am
Story Mageia 1 Beta 2 Released srlinuxx 27/04/2011 - 4:20am
Story Top 50 Portable Open Source Apps srlinuxx 27/04/2011 - 4:19am
Story The GNU/Linux Adventurer’s Backpack srlinuxx 27/04/2011 - 2:26am
Story Note to Mozilla: Guilt is not a business model srlinuxx 27/04/2011 - 2:25am

Gmail Notifier for Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

CheckGmail is a system tray application that checks a Gmail account for new mail. CheckGmail is an alternative Gmail Notifier for Linux and other *nix systems. It is fast, secure and uses minimal bandwidth via the use of Atom feeds.

Reclaiming ICT education - Why free software is a neccessity in schools

Filed under
OSS

For anyone who has studied computing or ICT in a UK school, this will probably come as little surprise. My classmates and I (like many others) were taught by a teacher with little specialist knowledge of the subject (she taught French the majority of the time), following a curriculum that predominantly consisted of instruction in the correct use of the Microsoft Office suite.

Looking Back on Three Years of OpenUsability with Jan Mühlig

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

Just following the recent World Usability Day and a few months past the third birthday of OpenUsability I took some time to talk to Jan Mühlig, one of the OpenUsability founders and to get an inside look at some of the history of the project, how it works from the inside and some of the current direction.

What Linux Needs to Win on Desktop

Filed under
Linux

For the last 15 years, Linux has grown from a small hobby of a university student to a powerful system which is rapidly gaining popularity every year. But unfortunately in majority of cases Linux based Desktop solutions are less preferable then the Windows or Mac based. Why ???

OpenOffice.org announces contest winners

Filed under
OOo

OpenOffice.org has announced the winners of its template and clipart contest. The judges distributed a total of five cash prizes totalling $1,700 for templates, and three cash prizes totalling $1,300 for clipart, as well as two Honorable Mentions for templates. In addition, the project will send T-shirts and other OpenOffice.org merchandise to many of the other entrants.

Cfengine Is Like Eating Your Vegetables or: How Ubuntu Made Me Lazy

Filed under
Gentoo

The dedicated hardware for the OVSD servers came in last week. Yay! Time to have some fun wrangling the new hardware. With Ben’s welcome assistance, we got the boxes racked up and physically connected in record time. So the guys stuck a Gentoo LiveCD into the first box for me, I rolled up my sleeves and waded in.

Ubuntu a la Mac

Filed under
Ubuntu

Despite the fact that I work with the world’s best operating system (Mac OS X), I can’t help but want to try other operating systems when I have the chance. I’ve played with many a Linux distro in the past, but I decided to give Ubuntu a try on my 20″ Intel iMac despite the fact that I knew I wouldn’t be able to run it natively.

Installing Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Not that long ago, the mere mention of installing Linux struck fear into the hearts of mortal men. Nowadays, it is a different story entirely, and Ubuntu is one of the easiest distros to install. In this chapter, Andrew and Paul Hudson cover how to get started with the install disc, including booting into Ubuntu Live to test your system. Then they cover the actual installation of Ubuntu, looking at the various options available.

Ubuntu Local Community Team In Tennessee

Filed under
Ubuntu

Michael Berger, a Linux/Unix System Engineer based in Knoxville, is organizing a Ubuntu Local Community Team (LoCo) in order to advocate and educate Linux users for the entire state of Tennessee about Ubuntu Linux and the Ubuntu "way." The focus will be on all derivatives of Ubuntu, including Edubuntu.

The KANOTIX distro implodes

Filed under
News

As of today, the KANOTIX distribution is...not dead, exactly, but most definitely without a firm direction.

Firefox 2 RSS

Filed under
Moz/FF

I've read a number of reviews comparing Firefox 2 and IE7's RSS capabilities. Every time Firefox comes up short. There's a reason for this though, and it relates to the Firefox philosophy of having enough features, not too many or too few.

The Value of Linux for the SMB Market

Filed under
Linux

Linux is here to stay. As the computing industry’s fastest growing operating system, some analysts predict that Linux will surpass Microsoft Windows in new server shipments in just a few years.

GPL V3 Takes Shape In Sydney

Filed under
OSS

The Free Software Foundation's (FSF) General Public Licence (GPL) is undergoing its biggest overhaul in 15 years and local members of the free software community are participating in the development process.

University of Toronto Hypes ‘Human Rights’ Open Source Project

Filed under
Misc

Developers at the University of Toronto are about to release what they see as the answer to inappropriate Internet censorship. psiphon, open source software set to hit the streets under the GNU General Public License, allows Internet users in restricted countries to gain unfettered Internet access

Open source lawyers take on e-learning patent

Filed under
OSS

The Software Freedom Law Center has filed a request with the US Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) that is seeking to invalidate an "Internet-Based Education Support System" patent that is owned by e-learning provider Blackboard.

Will Vista Be a Boon for Linux?

Filed under
OS

As enterprises of all stripes and sizes ponder whether or when to upgrade to Windows Vista, they could be confronted with at least three choices. 1) Stay with what they have, 2) Migrate to Vista, or 3) Migrate to Linux. Some of the thinking goes like this:

CMS pros and cons

Filed under
Software

We know there’s some of you still confused about all the CMS babble spreading around the web, so we thought it’d be a good idea to put together the top 10 pros and cons web designers should take into consideration when pondering on whether or not using a CMS app.

When Linux Runs Out of Memory

Filed under
Linux

Perhaps you rarely face it, but once you do, you surely know what's wrong: lack of free memory, or Out of Memory (OOM). The results are typical: you can no longer allocate more memory and the kernel kills a task (usually the current running one). Heavy swapping usually accompanies this situation, so both screen and disk activity reflect this.

Housekeeping utilities for Debian packages

Filed under
Linux

For all the efficiency and continued evolution of Debian's APT tools, some gaps in package management functionality remain. One of the largest ones is that, when a package is removed, any other packages that depend on it are not removed. The result is a growing number of orphans on the system. You can turn to a group of housekeeping tools that make maintaining your Debian system easier and more efficient.

Discover the Ajax Toolkit Framework for Eclipse

Filed under
News

The Ajax Toolkit Framework (ATF) is a core piece of the new Open Ajax initiative, which aims to increase accessibility to the powerful Web programming technique through the Eclipse Foundation. This article includes a HelloWorld example in which you install and configure the ATF, then use Eclipse and Dojo to create a basic Web application.

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