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Tuesday, 23 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Google Announces 2014-2015 Dates for Student Centered Open Source Code Programs Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:50am
Story Mark Shuttleworth, The State and Ubuntu 2.0 Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:47am
Story The future of Linux looks very, very thin Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:45am
Story SUSE, MariaDB and IBM team up to tame Big Data Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:40am
Story Linux Foundation certifications are taking off Roy Schestowitz 08/10/2014 - 12:38am
Story Gaming On Linux Loses Editor, Plagiarist to Blame. Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 10:44pm
Story KDE’s Plasma used in Hobbit movies [Video] Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 9:14pm
Story Meizu MX4 Pro May Give New Life To Ubuntu Touch Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 9:06pm
Story Cutelyst 0.4.0 is out! Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 7:20pm
Story Diversity is a crucial component of meritocracy Rianne Schestowitz 07/10/2014 - 5:54pm

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Agile Plus Open Source Equals Developer Success

  • Commercial Packages vs Open Source: Which is Better Long-term?
  • Will the real open source please stand up?
  • One Laptop per Child Lands in India
  • Better backup, syncing, and sharing
  • FOSS app eases the pain for San Diego community clinic
  • Linux Will Take Lion's Share of MID Market
  • The Asus Eee 1000 -- more power, still portable
  • KDE 4.1 in the press
  • OpenSUSE 11.0 vs Ubuntu 8.04
  • Online Security
  • Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex Mockup Designs
  • NVIDIA driver 173.14.12 in hardy-proposed and intrepid
  • Flying on the wings of freedom
  • Open Source: A 'Growing Challenge' to Microsoft
  • Does Cloud Computing Change the Open Source Rules?
  • Lenovo Jumps Into Netbooks, But Where's Linux?

InfoWorld announces our 2008 Best of Open Source Awards

Filed under
OSS

weblog.infoworld: InfoWord recently released winners of the 2008 Bossie Awards. The awards are based on a review and analysis of the products in action by the InfoWorld Test Center.

Operating free software down on planet Earth ...

Filed under
Ubuntu

thetimes.co.za: MARK Shuttleworth isn’t just a space tourist. To geeks the world over, he’s the Self-Appointed Benevolent Dictator for Life or SABDFL for short. It’s a nickname he’s earned as the driving force behind Ubuntu — an open-source operating system based on the Linux platform that is rated one of the best.

32 Ultra-Mobile PCs That Run Linux

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

linuxloop.com: Back in March, I tried to find as many Linux-based UMPCs as I could. At the time, I found 18, which was expanded to 20 with the help of commenters. After many more Linux-based UMPC releases, I decided to see how many more I could find.

Debian Project News - August 4th, 2008

Filed under
Linux

debian.org/News: Welcome to this year's 8th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Some of the topics covered in this issue include: Lenny frozen, Debian GNU/Linux 4.0 updated to include support for newer hardware, and Schedule for 8th annual Debian Conference announced.

a brief history of beauty in kde 4

Filed under
KDE

In The Beginning There was a Desktop ...

KDE wasn't always the shiniest tool in the shed. While KDE 1 certainly looked more coherent and generally nicer than most things on UNIX or Linux at the time, it wasn't .. you know .. gorgeous.

X.Org 7.4 To Lose DRI2 Support

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: It's six months late and X.Org 7.4 still hasn't shipped as its being held up on the release of Mesa 7.1. Hopefully though we'll see the release of Mesa 7.1, X.Org 7.4, and the X Server 1.5 in the very near future. However, there has been some last minute bloodshed before this first major X Server release in nearly a year.

Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase is Born

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Jono Bacon has announced the very first Ubuntu Free Culture Showcase! For a long time now we have been shipping a package called example-content with each release of Ubuntu. Why not use example-content as a great way to show off audio and video from free culture artists?

some Linuxworld headlines

Filed under
Linux
  • LinuxWorld Conversations Start Tomorrow

  • LinuxWorld: Showcasing the OS in data centers, mobile devices, e-voting
  • LinuxWorld Gets Underway in San Francisco
  • Dell at LinuxWorld this Week
  • Openbravo demonstrates compatibility with Ubuntu at LinuxWorld 2008
  • LinuxWorld preview: IBM engineer touts SELinux

First preview of Mono 2.0 is out

Filed under
Software
  • First preview of Mono 2.0 is out

  • Interview with Miguel de Icaza
  • How to remove Mono (M$) from Ubuntu Hardy Heron

PCLinuxOS to OpenSuse 11.0

Filed under
SUSE

bluelinux.blogspot: I recently decided to give OpenSuse 11.0 a spin on some of the computer terminals at work, replacing PCLinuxOS. It is not that I have any hard feelings towards PCLinuxOS, it is just that I prefer to stay up on the different distros available to make sure I'm not missing out on something. And, honestly, PCLinuxOS has been dragging behind the 'latest/greatest' software curve for a while now.

Why Microsoft cozied up to open source at OSCON

Filed under
Microsoft

linux.com: Last month at O'Reilly's Open Source Convention (OSCON), it seemed like Microsoft was everywhere you looked, avouching its interest in open source. Thanks to the company's history -- including some very recent history -- a great many in the open source community viewed the company's presence with mistrust, suspicious of Redmond's motives and apprehensive of what would follow. Surely Microsoft must want something, so what is it?

KDE 4.0 Style Theme for Firefox 3.0

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: Konqueror as a web browser still unfortunately lags quite a way behind Firefox in terms of compatibility. For that reason, many KDE users stick with Firefox, despite the poorer integration between the desktop environment and the browser.

The technophobe sister and Xubuntu project

Filed under
Linux

tuxtraining.com: Let me introduce to you, my sister. She’s the furtherest thing from a geek anyone in our generation can be. And she hates computers. I got a copy of Xubuntu 8.04 and began my install.

ASRock X48TurboTwins-WiFi with Linux

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: These X48 motherboards have been expensive, but now some of the budget manufacturers are introducing models at a lower cost. For just under $200 USD, ASRock has introduced the X48TurboTwins-WiFi. The ASRock X48TurboTwins-WiFi pairs Intel's X48 with the ICH9R Southbridge and offers a few extra features such as eSATA, integrated 802.11g WiFi, and IEEE-1394 Firewire.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Make your own Fedora re-spin

  • Replace the System Beep with a Compiz Effect
  • Ubuntu ca0106 Audigy SE sound card working with 5.1
  • dnstop: Monitor BIND DNS Server (DNS Network Traffic) From a Shell Prompt
  • Detecting Old Sound Cards in Ubuntu
  • How to change a users UID and GID
  • How To Turn Any Applications To A Widget In Ubuntu
  • Word completion-like feature in Openoffice.org Calc
  • Kickstart for Ubuntu 8.04 with LDAP Authentication
  • Command Line Quickies - ps
  • OpenAFS installation on Debian

Day Planner and Calizo: Simple calendaring tools

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If advanced calendar applications like Evolution and Sunbird are overkill for your needs, try Day Planner, a simple yet efficient calendaring utility. If you want to view your calendar as a timeline, check out Calizo instead.

Desktop Linux Distributions: Expectations of a home user

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Desktop Linux Distribution is getting fame in every day use among home users and even office users. Given the choice to select from a huge list of Desktop Linux Distributions home users are ought to get confused and it's not unusual that they do distro-hopping in the quest of what is so called "the best" for them.

Jim Zemlin and the Linux Foundation: Looking after Linus

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: While Linus Torvalds, the father of Linux, has a wide and well established fan-base, fewer people are aware of the wider organisation that supports his vital kernel development work.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 264

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: First look - Parsix GNU/Linux 1.5r1

  • News: Fedora 10 code name, interview with Red Hat's Jim Whitehurst, Debconf8 Schedule
  • Released last week: Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4.7, Parsix GNU/Linux 1.5r1
  • Upcoming releases: Ubuntu 8.10 Alpha 4, Mandriva Linux 2009 Beta 2, and openSUSE 11.1 Alpha 2
  • Reviewed last week: Mandriva 2009 Beta 1, Pardus 2008
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Initial Retpoline Support Added To LLVM For Spectre v2 Mitigation
    The LLVM code has been merged to mainline for the Retpoline x86 mitigation technique for Spectre Variant 2. This will be back-ported to LLVM 6.0 and also LLVM 5.0 with an immediate point release expected to get this patched compiler out in the wild. The compiler-side work -- similar to GCC's Retpoline code -- is to avoid generating code where an indirect branch could have its prediction poisoned by a rogue actor. The Retpoline support uses indirect calls in a non-speculatable way.
  • Teen Hacker Who Social Engineered His Way Into Top-Level US Government Officials' Accounts Pleads Guilty To Ten Charges
    The teenage hacker who tore CIA director John Brennan a new AOL-hole is awaiting sentencing in the UK. Kane Gamble, the apparent founder of hacker collective Crackas With Attitude, was able to access classified documents Brennan has forwarded to his personal email account by posing as a Verizon tech. Social engineering is still the best hacking tool. It's something anyone anywhere can do. If you do it well, a whole host of supposedly-secured information can be had, thanks to multiple entities relying on the same personal identifiers to "verify" the social engineer they're talking to is the person who owns accounts they're granting access to. Despite claiming he was motivated by American injustices perpetrated around the world (Palestine is namechecked in the teen's multiple mini-manifestos), a lot of what Gamble participated in was plain, old fashioned harassment.
  • The Guardian view on cyberwar: an urgent problem [Ed: Lists several attacks by Microsoft Windows (but names neither)]
    The first known, and perhaps the most successful of these, was the joint US/Israeli Stuxnet attack on the Iranian nuclear programme in 2009. Since then there has been increasing evidence of attacks of this sort by Russia – against Estonia in 2009, and then against Ukraine, where tens of thousands of attacks on everything from power supplies to voting machines have opened an under-reported front in an under-reported war. Across the Baltic, the Swedish government has just announced a beefed-up programme of civil defence, of which the most substantial part will be an attempt to protect its software and networks from attacks. Meanwhile, North Korean state hackers are blamed by western intelligence services for the WannaCry ransomware attacks which last year shut down several NHS hospitals in the UK. Persistent reports suggest the US has interfered in this way with North Korea’s nuclear missile programme.
  • Reproducible Builds: Weekly report #143
  • Don’t Install Meltdown And Spectre Patches, Intel Warns It Would Increase System Reebots
  • On that Spectre mitigations discussion
    By now, almost everybody has probably seen the press coverage of Linus Torvalds's remarks about one of the patches addressing Spectre variant 2. Less noted, but much more informative, is David Woodhouse's response on why those patches are the way they are.

Tails 3.5 Anonymous OS Released to Mitigate Spectre Vulnerability for AMD CPUs

Tails, the open-source Linux-based operating system designed to protect user's privacy while surfing the Internet, also known as Anonymous OS, was updated today to version 3.5. Coming only two weeks after the Tails 3.4 release, which included patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities publicly disclosed earlier this month, today's Tails 3.5 update is here to bump the Linux kernel to version 4.14.13 and include the microcode firmware for AMD CPUs to mitigate the Spectre flaw. Read more

Graphics: Freedreno, Gallium3D, AMDGPU, RadeonSI, Mesa

  • Code Aurora Working On Adreno 6xx Support For Freedreno
    The Qualcomm-aligned Code Aurora is working on supporting the latest-generation Adreno A6xx graphics hardware with the open-source Freedreno+MSM driver stack.
  • Work Revised On Adding SPIR-V Support To Clover Gallium3D
    Last May we reported on a Nouveau developer adding SPIR-V support to Gallium3D's OpenCL state tracker. Finally the better part of one year later, Pierre Moreau is ready with the second version of these patches to accept this IR associated with Vulkan / OpenCL 2.1+ within Clover.
  • Trying Out DRM-Next For Linux 4.16 With AMDGPU On Polaris & Vega
    I have spent some time this weekend trying out the DRM-Next code slated for inclusion in Linux 4.16 when its merge window opens next week. The DRM-Next state of the AMDGPU driver appears to be in good shape, at least for the RX 580 and RX Vega cards used for my initial testing.
  • RadeonSI NIR Back-End Picks Up Support For More OpenGL Extensions
    It was just a few days ago that Valve Linux developer Timothy Arceri enabled GLSL 4.50 support for RadeonSI's NIR back-end after previously taking care of tessellation shaders and other requirements. Now he has taken to implementing some other extensions in RadeonSI's NIR code-path.
  • mesa 18.0-0-rc1
    The first release candidate for Mesa 18.0.0 is now available. The plan is to have one release candidate every Friday, until the anticipated final release on 9th February 2018. The expectation is that the 17.3 branch will remain alive with bi-weekly releases until the 18.0.1 release. NOTE: Building the SWR with LLVM 3.9 is currently not possible. Please use newer LLVM version until the issue is resolved. Here are the people which helped shape the current release.
  • Mesa 18.0 Now Under Feature Freeze With 18.0-RC1 Premiere
    Feature development on Mesa 18.0 has now ended with the release today of 18.0-RC1 following the code-base being branched. Emil Velikov of Collabora just announced the availability of Mesa 18.0-RC1. As usual, he's planning on weekly release candidates until the 18.0.0 stable release is ready to ship. Velikov tentatively expects to ship Mesa 18.0.0 around 9 February, but as we know from past releases, it might end up slipping by some days.

Using Dual 4K Monitors Stacked With GNOME

The setup for my main production system that is still on Fedora Workstation 26 with GNOME Shell 3.24.3 has been working out fine. The two displays are the ASUS MG28UQ monitors that work out well on their own and do work with AMDGPU FreeSync on Linux. A GeForce GTX 1050 Ti is enough to power the dual 3840 x 2160 displays for desktop tasks mostly limited to many terminals, Firefox, Chrome, Thunderbird, and other GNOME desktop applications. Certainly that lower-end Pascal GPU isn't fast enough for 4K gaming, but it's not like I have the time for any gaming and for a purely desktop system it's working out fine paired with the 387.34 proprietary driver on Fedora 26 paired with Linux 4.14. Read more