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Friday, 20 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Exclusive Interview: DeLisa Alexander Of Red Hat srlinuxx 13/09/2012 - 9:15pm
Story Linux users are hungry for commercial games srlinuxx 13/09/2012 - 9:13pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 13/09/2012 - 3:18am
Story Becoming a completely Linux household srlinuxx 13/09/2012 - 2:09am
Story Five new features in Ubuntu 12.10 Beta 1 srlinuxx 13/09/2012 - 2:06am
Story What’s going on with GNOME? srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:52pm
Story What to prepare before installing Arch Linux the first time srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:48pm
Story Be wary of LibreOffice 3.6 srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:42pm
Story Meet the Raspberry Pi Supercomputer--with Lego! srlinuxx 12/09/2012 - 10:39pm
Story I will teach you C srlinuxx 1 12/09/2012 - 10:30pm

Edubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 2 Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix: Out of all of the Ubuntu derivative distributions, the one that's received the least amount of attention really has been Edubuntu. With a slogan of "Linux for Young Human Beings", Edubuntu is a Linux distribution designed for students and use in school environments.

Is Ubuntu the way forward for Linux?

Filed under
Interviews

ITPro: During the last three years Ubuntu has sprung from nothing to become the most popular desktop distribution of Linux. There are good reasons for Ubuntu's success. Ubuntu is clean and uncomplicated which makes it attractive to entry level users, without sacrificing the traditional Debian virtues of stability, flexibility and configurability, which has made it an enticing proposition for developers.

Solution: Preventing damage after a system lockup

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Tutorials: No matter how stable the Linux kernel is, things like hardware failures can still lock up your system quite effectively. If you ever encounter a case like that, rebooting is pretty much the only option. However, there is rebooting and rebooting. This solution describes a way to reboot your system that will do things like terminating all processes, syncing the remounting the disks, in order to prevent damage as much as possible. This can save you a lot of fscking and data loss.

SUSE vs. Ubuntu - first impressions

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet: I’ve used SUSE Linux before, but that was way back in the day of version 9. Things have changed a lot since then. I’ve been happily using Kubuntu 7.04 for a while now, but wanted to begin using SUSE on a daily basis so that I can test their emerging set of educational software.

Command line tip - peek into the start and end of files

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Sometimes, especially when dealing with log files, you might want to peek at the start and/or end of a file to see just that bit of the file and not the whole thing. Of course, there are a couple of easy commands that allow you to do this.

Also: Change Ubuntu’s default paper size from A4 to Letter

Making Gnash: a well-deserved name?

Filed under
Software

freesoftware mag: Gnash is the Free Software Foundation’s alternative Apple Flash player. Version 0.8 is the third alpha release, and frankly, it rocks! It is also one of the first projects to be covered by the GPLv3.

Security Beefed Up for Linux

cxotoday.com: All infrastructure, regardless of underlying platform, need to be secured and protected through multiple layers of security. Linux systems are not an exception. The inherent security advantages of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the Application Stack combined with Symantec's Critical System Protection, gives Small and Medium Businesses (SMBs) a standards-based foundation for a variety of application workloads.

Emacs 22 enhancements make venerable editor flashy again

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Emacs 22.1 hit the street a month ago, a long-awaited update to the GNU project's customizable and extensible do-everything super-editor that has been six years in the making. Here's a look at what you'll find in the new version.

Setting up a Layer 3 tunneling VPN with using OpenSSH

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: This article describes how to use the new tunneling features of OpenSSH V 4.3 to establish a VPN between two Debian or Debian-like systems. Note that by tunneling I am referring to layer-3 IP-in-SSH tunneling, not the TCP connection forwarding that most people refer to as tunneling.

Bring Out the GIMP Part 1: GIMP Basics

Filed under
GIMP

maximumpc.com: No matter which Linux distro you run, chances are it came with a magnificent little image editor called GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program). Unlike Paint and other free-with-your-OS image editors, GIMP is a full featured graphics app with a broad range of capabilities that rival those os Adobe Photoshop.

Open Source Gaming Review: Linux Gamers Live DVD 0.9.2

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

Raiden's Realm: Being an avid gamer who loves Linux, I felt that it would be a good idea to go try out the new Linux-Gamers.net live dvd. This is a live dvd built on Arch Linux and designed with one purpose in mind. Gaming.

Configure GMail in Evolution, Thunderbird or KMail

Filed under
HowTos

debianadmin: Many of us would like to use our GMail accounts in Evolution, and to a lesser degree Thunderbird and KMail. Here is a step by step guide on how to configure Evolution, Thunderbird and KMail to access you GMail account.

A Useful Hack for Storing Text or Editable Pictures You Need to Reuse, in OpenOffice Impress Presentations

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: My friend Ben Horst wrote to me with a question about how to store editable content in a presentation that you reuse periodically. Like a few buttons formatted a particular way, text boxes, anything that can't easily be drawn and formatted and has to look a certain way. My answer was, well, kind of a hack, but I think it's useful enough to point out.

Fedora 7.0 Linux distribution

Filed under
Reviews

PC Advisor: Fedora 7.0 is the latest community-based Linux release from Red Hat. Fedora and Novell's OpenSuse are Ubuntu Linux's two chief "competitors". All three Linux distros are free downloads; all have vibrant online communities where you can go for tips, troubleshooting and advice. And all three Linux distributions will hook you up with a modern, friendly environment that you can start exploring right away.

Are top Linux developers losing the will to code?

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk: Core Linux developers are finding themselves managing and checking, rather than coding, as the number of kernel contributors grows and the contributor network becomes more complex.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 209

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interview: Clement Lefebvre, Linux Mint

  • Feedback: One year with Puppy Linux
  • News: GPL 3, Google Desktop, GNU/Linux distro timeline, YaSTRS for openSUSE, PC-BSD LiveCD, Yellow Dog Linux 5.0.2
  • Released last week: Dreamlinux 2.2 "Multimedia GL", SoL 25.00
  • Upcoming releases: Fluxbuntu "Gutsy Gibbon"
  • Donations: KTorrent receives US$400
  • New distributions: Baltix GNU/Linux, Draco GNU/Linux, FrogLinux, pclosBE, TinyME, UW-Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Organize and find files fast with GTKtalog

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you own a large number of CD or DVD media disks, you might have a hard time finding a specific file or folder on one of them -- unless you use GTKtalog. This utility scans every file and folder on your storage media and saves the captured information in a single-file searchable database named CDkatalog.

GConf — GNOME under the hood

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: Gconf is a system built in GNOME 2 which stores applications’ preferable configuration data as well as graphical environment variables in its own files.

Mini Review of a Tiny PCLOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews
-s

TinyMe is a scaled down version of PCLinuxOS 2007. The latest version is delivered as a 177 MB liveCD and features the Lightweight X11 Desktop Enviroment, Synaptic, and the PCLinuxOS Control Center. It comes with a few applications, so it could be a really light version of PCLOS for older computers or a foundation on which to build your own system as you choose.

Linspire pays the cost of Volish agreement

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The Inquirer: LINUX DISTRIBUTOR Linspire has shown what it is costing it to sign a deal with Microsoft over patents.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Games

What is Linux?

Leftovers: OSS

  • ISS Federal Lead Rob Rogers on Agencies’ Open Source Moves & ‘Information Advantage’ Efforts
    ExecutiveBiz recently caught up with ISS Federal Systems Vice President Rob Rogers for this interview to discuss ongoing data-related trends in government and where he sees agencies prioritizing efforts in that arena, plus his ideas for how the government should approach open source methodology. [...] We have seen a significant shift in the past five years around agencies adopting and embracing open source methods. For one, open source technology is the primary catalyst behind some of the most significant progress related to the evolution of “big data” and analytic capabilities, which is used pervasively in the intelligence community. Certain agencies have contributed major projects to the open source community, which further solidifies their position on supporting open source. One notable example is NSA’s contribution of NiFi and Accumulo to the Apache Software Foundation in 2014. If these types of actions are an indicator of the direction that the IC agencies are heading in their support of open source, then the future is bright.
  • Davos 2017: China unites 25 countries to establish Global Blockchain Business Council
    On January 17, the governmental and industrial representatives from China and 25 other countries gathered in Davos, Switzerland for the Davos Forum. According to the latest update provided by Tai Cloud Corporation to EconoTimes, Jamie Elizabeth Smith, the former spokesperson and special assistant of the U.S. president Obama, announced that the Global Blockchain Business Council (GBBC) is formally established. The first national team members include senior executives of World Bank Mariana Dahan, former Estonian President Toomas Hendrik Ilves, former Prime Minister of Haidi Laurent Lamont, former Economy Minister of Ukraine Aivaras Abromavičius.
  • Intel's BigDL deep learning framework snubs GPUs for CPUs
    Last week Intel unveiled BigDL, a Spark-powered framework for distributed deep learning, available as an open source project. With most major IT vendors releasing machine learning frameworks, why not the CPU giant, too? What matters most about Intel's project may not be what it offers people building deep learning solutions on Spark clusters, but what it says about Intel’s ambitions to promote hardware that competes with GPUs for those applications.
  • Google's VR art app is open source and ready to get weird
    Google's Tilt Brush is capable of some pretty impressive results. But what if those 3D paintings and projects you made while strapped into virtual reality could escape into the real world?
  • How is your community promoting diversity?
    Open source software is a great enabler for technology innovation. Diversity unlocks innovation and drives market growth. Open source and diversity seem like the ultimate winning combination, yet ironically open source communities are among the least diverse tech communities. This is especially true when it comes to inherent diversity: traits such as gender, age, ethnicity, and sexual orientation.
  • Walmart’s Contributions to Open Source
    You might first think about open source in the context of outstanding tools for lean startup companies, but open source also finds a welcome home in behemoth, established companies, such as Walmart. In this O’Reilly OSCON video interview with Walmart Lab’s Alex Grigoryan, learn how Walmart both benefits from and contributes back to open source. The key takeaway? Open source allows you to reuse software components in labor saving ways.
  • Librecore: Aiming To Be A Better Libre Spin Of Coreboot
    Librecore is a new project aiming to be a new Coreboot downstream with a focus remaining on providing fully-free system firmware. Separately, Minifree/Libreboot has been accused (and admitted by Leah Rowe) to not paying a vendor for a completed contract. Librecore was formed due to "[Libreboot lead developer Leah Rowe] alienating large portions of the community, plus the stagnant and hard to use libreboot firmware and build system." With Librecore, they are aiming to use industry-standard tools and build environments. Another different design decision is pursuing Petitboot as the payload for a more modern and useful interface over GRUB as a payload.
  • Use of open source software growing across telecom
    Open source software may still be a new model for the telecommunications industry, but it’s rapidly gaining traction as operators look to mimic computing world. While the open source community has quickly gaining ground in the computing space, the traditional telecommunications industry has a history of hardening its siloed approach to networking technology. This was especially apparent at a time when most mobile telecom networks were 2G-based, with 3G technology just coming online in more advanced markets.
  • Open Source Software: What Every In-House Counsel Should Know
    Open source software (OSS) is ubiquitous in software development today, enabling technical innovation, productivity gains, and touching everything from big data and cloud to mobile and embedded. Control modules on the market today commonly include OSS components such as real-time operating systems, libraries, data interfaces, firmware, and display software.
  • 4 Common Open Source License Compliance Failures and How to Avoid Them
    Companies or organizations that don’t have a strong open source compliance program often suffer from errors and limitations in processes throughout the software development cycle that can lead to open source compliance failures. The previous article in this series covered common intellectual property failures. This time, we’ll discuss the four common open source license compliance failures and how to avoid them.

Docker 1.13, Containers, and DevOps

  • Introducing Docker 1.13
    Today we’re releasing Docker 1.13 with lots of new features, improvements and fixes to help Docker users with New Year’s resolutions to build more and better container apps. Docker 1.13 builds on and improves Docker swarm mode introduced in Docker 1.12 and has lots of other fixes. Read on for Docker 1.13 highlights.
  • Docker 1.13 Officially Released, Docker for AWS and Azure Ready for Production
    Docker announced today the general availability of Docker 1.13, the third major update of the open-source application container engine for GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows operating systems. Docker 1.13 has been in development for the past couple of months, during which it received no less than seven RC (Release Candidate) versions that implemented numerous improvements for the new Swarm Mode introduced in Docker 1.12, a few security features, as well as a new Remote API (version 1.25) and Client.
  • Distributed Fabric: A New Architecture for Container-Based Applications
    There’s a palpable sense of excitement in the application development world around container technology. Containers bring a new level of agility and speed to app development, giving developers the ability to break large monolithic apps into small, manageable microservices that can talk to one another, be more easily tested and deployed, and operate more efficiently as a full application. However, containers also demand a new architecture for the application services managing these microservices and apps, particularly in regards to service discovery — locating and consuming the services of those microservices.
  • DevOps trends emerging for 2017 and beyond
    Finally, one of the biggest trends for 2017 will not be just a focus on engaging and implementing some of these DevOps best practices into your enterprise, but a sweeping adoption of the DevOps/agile culture. This is because one of the most important – if not the absolute most key –tenets to a successful DevOps organization is culture. The enterprises that most espouse the shared responsibility, the empowered autonomous teams, the can-do attitudes, and the continuous learning environment in which DevOps thrives will see the biggest benefits.