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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 25 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What's Coming Up For GCC 4.7 srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 7:35pm
Story Pimp your CentOS into a perfect desktop srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 7:34pm
Story Spending the day with an Ocelot srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 7:32pm
Story Never underestimate the amount of open source software available srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 7:30pm
Story Debian Project News - August 15th srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 7:29pm
Story Jim Zemlin on 20 Years of Liunx srlinuxx 1 15/08/2011 - 5:21pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 418 srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 4:27pm
Story Debunking popular open source myths srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 4:25pm
Story 10 Linux Server Distros That Could Save You a Bundle srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 4:19pm
Story Android vendors lose the Linux rights srlinuxx 15/08/2011 - 4:18pm

Xfce 4.4: The best lightweight desktop environment

Filed under
Software

For years, the lightweight Xfce has been a popular desktop environment for Linux distributions running on older hardware, thanks to its lower demand on resources as compared to KDE and GNOME; it's an ideal desktop for machines with less than 256MB of memory. Until recently, however, using Xfce was a little laborious, but with its latest release last month, Xfce is a much more usable desktop environment.

Ubuntu spurns Microsoft's advances

Filed under
Ubuntu

Products evolve and mature. Sometimes they even get better. So when I installed Vista, I thought it would only be fair if I also downloaded the latest version of Ubuntu, burned it onto CD and installed it on another machine.

How Novell Saved Millions With Open Source

Filed under
SUSE

How much money can a large enterprise save by migrating to open source from proprietary? In Novell's case, it's millions of dollars.

Ten Leading Open Source Innovators

Filed under
OSS

In the past, any open-source discussion centered on Linux, but now that Linux is a mature, stable operating system, the real innovation is happening elsewhere. As Illuminata analyst Gordon Haff notes, what’s most interesting is what happens when the open-source push collides with other technology trends. With those points in mind, here are ten leading commercial open-source innovators and the projects they’re working on.

A Windows Fanboy's Foray Into Linux: Fedora Core 6

Filed under
Reviews

Because of all my horrific previous experiences with distros from RedHat, I was really dreading the whole experience (and the response my review would provoke). But, to my chagrin, RedHat has cleaned up their act considerably.

A look at Slackware's package utilities

Filed under
Linux

Slackware Linux is the oldest surviving Linux distribution. Late last year the project marked 13 years of non-stop development with the release of Slackware 11.0. The distribution is best known for its no-frills, minimum customizations approach to applications like KDE. It's also notorious for its reluctance to switch to new version of several popular applications like Apache or GCC. No surprise then, that its package management system has seen little change over the years and is still available in just one flavor -- vanilla.

A good Linux kernel book for aspiring nerds

Filed under
Linux

It's time for me to come clean. I'm a Linux poseur. But a new Linux book, Greg Kroah-Hartman's Linux Kernel in a Nutshell, could help people like me get some real technical chops.

KDE at SCALE 5x

Filed under
KDE

KDE was once again well represented at the 2007 Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE 5x), demonstrating to show-goers why it is the most popular Linux desktop. There were talks, demonstrations from KDE developers and and thank yous in return.

OpenOffice 2.1

Filed under
Software

Lots of folks on the FOSS side of things tout OpenOffice (OO) as an alternative to Microsoft Office (M)). The basic argument is that OO, for basic functionality, is every bit as good as MO, but without the cost. Here's an example where OO fails to provide anything near the quality of MO.

The ‘Open' Tower of Babel

Filed under
Software

According to the Bible, there was a time when all those on earth spoke one language. And humanity, united by one language, started building the Tower of Babel to reach the heavens. As this was open defiance against God's wishes, He thought that the best way to stop these efforts would be to create confusion between humans by making everybody speak different languages so that no one could understand each other. But in the world of open source, GNOME and KDE are serving as the ‘open' tower of Babel.

The Participation Culture

Filed under
OSS

I am lurking on the OpenMoko mailing lists. This is an educational experience for me. Although I have participated in many heated discussions concerning Free software, I have never watched such a high-profile full-fledged Free software project start from the ground up. It's fascinating watching different sorts of geeks interact.

GNOME, KDE: Can't We All Just Get Along?

Filed under
Software

What is wrong with KDE 3.x? What is wrong with GNOME 2.8+? These seem to be the two questions arising from the recent revival of Linus vs. GNOME spat.

Book Review: Ubuntu Hacks

Filed under
Reviews

I recently got hold of a very nice book on Ubuntu called Ubuntu Hacks. Put in a nutshell, this book is a collection of around 100 tips and tricks which the authors choose to call hacks, which explain how to accomplish various tasks in Ubuntu Linux. The so called hacks range from down right ordinary to the other end of the spectrum of doing specialised things.

Yes Virginia, you can run Beryl alone

Filed under
HowTos

This post here and this one here got me thinking. The question — an often-asked one, I might add — is whether or not Fluxbox (or Openbox, for that matter) can run with the Beryl framework.

Converting music the easy way.

Filed under
Software

I recently had a task where I had to convert music from one format to another. I knew that there had to be an easy way to convert these music files so I forged on. Then I found it! The holy grail of music converters.

Search your IT data with Splunk

Filed under
Software

When something goes wrong in an IT server farm, it can take days for system administrators to find the root cause. Splunk is an enterprise-level search tool that can index logs and IT data, including server events, network events, and application events from one or more servers or network devices. You can then search data from across all your servers from just one place with a single browser- or console-based tool.

Ubuntu Linux error - fsck died with exit status 1

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I’ve noticed an error: fsck died with exit status 1 Now I need to find out which file system is causing error. After digging around boot process files I found a script called checkfs.sh located at /etc/init.d/ directory.

Convert Physical Windows Systems Into Virtual Machines To Be Run On A Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
HowTos

This article shows how you can convert a physical Windows system (XP, 2003, 2000, NT4 SP4+) into a VMware virtual machine with the free VMware Converter Starter. The resulting virtual machine can be run in the free VMware Player and VMware Server, and also in VMware Workstation and other VMware products.

Linux/Unix commands: How to get copy, conversion power with dd

Filed under
HowTos

System administrators often have to copy data around. Copying and converting ordinary data is easily accomplished with the Linux command called cp. However, if the data is not ordinary, cp is not powerful enough. The needed power can be found in the dd command, and here are some ways to put that power to good use.

Also: Using YUM in RHEL5 for RPM systems

One Week With KDE : My Challenge

Filed under
KDE

In response to all this recent nonsense about gnome vs KDE vs Linus vs everyone else that has jumped on this bandwagon I thought I would do the responsible thing and put the two to the test. I will use KDE for one full week and post my thoughts at the end of that time.

Also: The Switch To KDE : Day 1

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Ubuntu

  • Ubuntu Phone, Sep 2016 - Vorsprung durch Touch
    The Ubuntu Phone is getting better, and with every new iteration of the OTA, my little BQ Aquaris E4.5 is gaining more speed and functionality. Like in the air force, with an avionics upgrade, which transforms ancient wings into a powerful and modern bird of prey. Only the pace of advancement is lagging behind the market. See what Android and iOS can do, even Windows Phone, and you realize how late and insufficiently meaningful the Ubuntu Phone really is. This has to change, massively. This latest round does bring some fine goods to the table - more speed and stability, better icons, more overall visual polish, incremental improvements in the applications and the scopes. But that's not enough to win the heart of the average user. A more radical, app-centric effort is required. More focus on delivering the mobile experience, be it as it may. Ubuntu cannot revolutionalize that which is already considered the past. It can only join the club and enjoy the benefits of a well-established reality. And that is a kickass app stack that makes the touch device worth using in the first place. Still, it's not all gloomy. E4.5 is a better product now than it was a year ago, fact. Ubuntu Phone is a better operating system than it was even this spring, fact. So maybe one day we will see Ubuntu become an important if not dominant player in the phone and tablet space. It sure is heading in the right direction, my only fear is the availability of resources to pull off this massive rehaul that is needed to make it stand up to the old and proven giants. And that's it really. If you're keen on Linux (not Android) making it in the mobile world, do not forget to check my Ubuntu tablet review! Especially the convergence piece. On that merry note, you do remember that I'm running a wicked contest this year, too? He/she who reads my books might get a chance to win an M10 tablet. Indeed. Off you go, dear readers. Whereas I will now run the same set of tests we did here on the Aquaris tablet, and see how it likes the OTA-12 upgrade. The end.
  • Ubuntu 16.10 Unity 8 - new window snapping feature
  • Ubuntu Online Summit for Ubuntu 17.04 is Taking Place In Mid-November
  • Ubuntu Online Summit: 15-16 November 2016

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • 10 Top Open Source Artificial Intelligence Tools for Linux
    In this post, we shall cover a few of the top, open-source artificial intelligence (AI) tools for the Linux ecosystem. Currently, AI is one of the ever advancing fields in science and technology, with a major focus geared towards building software and hardware to solve every day life challenges in areas such as health care, education, security, manufacturing, banking and so much more.
  • List of FLOSS International Conferences September 2016 Materials
  • This Week In Servo 78
    Our overall roadmap is available online and now includes the initial Q3 plans. From now on, we plan to include the quarterly plan with a high-level breakdown in the roadmap page.
  • Firefox 49 Release: Find out what is new
    Firefox 49.0 is the next major stable release of the web browser. Firefox 48.0.2 and earlier versions of Firefox can be updated to the new release.
  • Open-Source Climate Change Data From NASA, NOAA, & Others Available For 1st Time
    Climate change has many components — rising sea levels, alterations in rainfall patterns, and an increase in severe storm activity, among others. Communities around the world are faced with the need to plan for climate change but don’t have the information available to do so effectively.
  • Another Setback for 3D Printed Gun Advocate Cody Wilson as Court of Appeals Rules That National Security Concerns Outweigh Free Speech
    It’s been a long, drawn-out battle, beginning in 2013 when Cody Wilson, founder of Defense Distributed, published the open source files for his 3D printed handgun, the Liberator, online. The State Department ordered that he take the files down, and Wilson complied, but not before thousands had downloaded them and spread them elsewhere on the Internet. In 2015, with the help of gun rights organization The Second Amendment Foundation, Wilson filed a federal lawsuit claiming that the State Department had violated not only his Second Amendment but his First Amendment rights. By suppressing his right to share information online, Wilson argued, the State Department was violating his right to free speech.
  • In 3D-Printed Gun Case, Federal Court Permits Speech Censorship in the Name of Alleged National Security
  • Oracle tries playing nice with Java EE rebels
    With Oracle now trying to get back on track with advancing enterprise Java, the company is seeking rapprochement with factions that had sought to advance the platform on their own. The two groups involved are mostly amenable to patching up the relationship. Oracle's Anil Gaur, group vice president of engineering, said this week he had already been in touch with some of the concerned parties. The two factions include Java EE Guardians, led by former Oracle Java EE evangelist Reza Rahman, and Microprofile.io, which has included participation from Red Hat and IBM.

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