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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 28 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Ubuntu Unity 2D tweaking tool srlinuxx 1 24/04/2011 - 8:49pm
Story On desktop re-invention srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 5:17pm
Story Introducing The R5 Game Engine srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 5:14pm
Story 19 things we'd change about KDE srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 4:56pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 5:29am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 5:12am
Story The Linux Security Circus: On GUI isolation srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 1:50am
Story My thoughts on Unity srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 1:48am
Story Gnome 3 Look & Feel srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 1:47am
Story The Linux Power Problem Is Widespread, Hits Desktops Too srlinuxx 24/04/2011 - 1:45am

Fallout from the Microsoft-Novell agreement continues

Filed under
SUSE

(We regret to let you know that starting in 2007, we will no longer be publishing the Novell NetWare Tips Newsletter.) Fallout from the Microsoft-Novell agreement continues unabated. Just about everyone who doesn’t work for Redmond or Waltham has jumped in and criticized the deal. Heck, even Microsoft’s own open source guru, Jason Matusow had some less then complimentary things to say about it!

Why We Need an Open Source Second Life

Filed under
Software

Unless you have been living under a rock for the six months, you will have noticed that the virtual world Second Life is much in the news. According to its home page, there are currently around 1,700,000 residents, who are spending $600,000 – that's real, not virtual, money – in the world each day.

Mark Shuttleworth: Binary-only codecs, nyet

Filed under
Ubuntu

The distinctions between software that enables the hardware to function fully, and software that delivers a specific feature, are manifest. Ubuntu has included firmware, and used proprietary drivers since its inception.

Study: Developers Favor Linux

Filed under
Linux

In its most recent survey of some 400 software developers with Linux experience, the Evans Data research firm discovered a major change.

Open source and management disputes

Filed under
Software

Open source vendors can't be run like their closed source counterparts. The programming talent, and the people behind that talent, aren't like other managers. I thought of this when looking at a stray comment Marc Fleury of RedHat's JBOSS.

Dump Linux now!

Filed under
Linux

I have always been a fan of fringe operating systems. Perhaps it's a sickness peculiar to geeks. Or maybe it's just me. But now I think it is time to dump GNU/Linux. Don't get me wrong: I still love GNU/Linux. It's just gotten. . . boring. Linux is so ready for the desktop, it's boring.

Meeting people for keysigning - using Biglumber

Filed under
HowTos

You've set up gpg and can now use it for signing and encryption - but how to go about getting your key signed so that you are not only relying on the web of trust?

Canonical and Debian - friend or foe?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Pointed at the issues by Josselin Mouette’s post, I got aware of a list of issues posted by JP Rosevear, which is a reply to Mark Shuttleworths post to the opensuse mailinglist. Note especially point 2, which is: “Preventing the Debian GNOME maintainer from updating GNOME packages until after Ubuntu LSO had shipped because you had hired him.”

The OLPC Sugar Inteface: Don't Do it

Filed under
Linux
OLPC

The OLPC's interface is simply way too complicated. I just read through the human interface guidelines for the project; and by god, I got lost after only a few paragraphs. How are kids supposed to learn all this?

Why C has no place in Computer Science research

Filed under
Software

I came across this post, which highlights top 5 reasons why a developer should unlearn C. Given the past experience I had with realities of C development I mostly concur with the author.

Jono Bacon: Talking Heads

Filed under
Ubuntu

Great first day of the Ubuntu Open Week yesterday. My initial smugness about the number of attendees was over-shadowed by the smug-overdrive that I launched into when we had over 340 attendees in some of the classes. Smugr 2.0 beta.

Thai government abandons Open Source, OLPC

Filed under
OLPC
OSS

THE JUNTA which took control of Thailand after a peaceful coup seems to be following Microsoft's roadmap to success.

Not only has the Junta abandoned the previous government's plan to shift to Open Sauce, it has also canned its involvement the 'one laptop per child' scheme, which has been roundly attacked by Microsoft.

Kubuntu 6.10 (Edgy Eft) Step By Step Installation with Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

Kubuntu is a user friendly operating system based on KDE, the K Desktop Environment. With a predictable 6 month release cycle and part of the Ubuntu project, Kubuntu is the GNU/Linux distribution for everyone.

How dumb can GNU/Linux users be?

Filed under
Linux

Answer: As dumb as necessary.

Let's rephrase: How technically sophisticated should GNU/Linux users have to be? How knowledgeable should any computer user have to be? The answer to that, of course, ranges from "very" to "not very." We need to get past the name-calling of clueless newbie and sneering elitist, and understand that there are going to be varying levels of ability in any community.

A survey of Linux PDF viewers

Filed under
Software

Portable Document Format, designed in the early 1990s by Adobe Systems, is slowly replacing PostScript as the preferred format for saving and viewing generic documents. Early on, only Adobe supplied programs that enabled users to view PDF files. But since the format's specification is open, Adobe Reader (formerly "Adobe Acrobat Reader") is now only one among an increasing set of PDF viewers. Here's a guide to the best alternatives for Linux users.

Sun VP Quits over Open-Source Java Move

Filed under
OSS

Sun thanks Graham for his many contributions to the company and to Java technology. Graham is widely respected by Sun employees and developers around the world. While it is always sad to see an employee of his caliber depart, we wish him well in all his future endeavors.

Also: Sun's Open Source Java Move: Simply Beautiful

Pick up a penguin - Linux explained

Filed under
Linux

There can't be many people who haven't heard of Linux. In short, it's an operating system just like Windows but, unlike Windows, you won't find it on many PCs you buy from the high street or from computer magazines.

Viva la Linspire

Filed under
Linux

Linspire Inc. today announced the release of its first French-language version, Linspire French 5, challenging Mandriva on its home turf. "Now French-speaking customers from around the world can experience a secure, reliable, easy-to-use, and thoroughly translated desktop Linux in their native language," CEO Kevin Carmony proclaimed.

Only minor upgrades for Linux

Filed under
Linux

It seems that the Linux community is happy with the progress of its kernel development. According to sources on the Internet, the new version, which should be numbered 2.6.19, will only include several bug fixes, security patches and minor upgrades.

Nintendo Wii: the Ars Technica review

Filed under
Gaming

With the Xbox 360 and the PS3, the primary focus is graphical prowess. What special effects can be added to games; how high can we push the resolution, and just how good we can make these titles look? In many cases these new games feel a lot like old games with a new coat of paint. One might begin to wonder if we are going to see the same basic gaming concepts over and over, simply with better graphics as time goes on? Nintendo is saying no

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New Blackmagic and Wine

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • Google, Samsung, Radisys join CORD project
    The Open Networking Lab (ON.Lab) and The Linux Foundation have spun off the Central Office Re-architected as a Data Center (CORD) initiative into its own, new open source project, and Google, Samsung Electronics and Radisys are joining the CORD and ONOS Projects as new partners. Google plans to host the first CORD Summit on July 29 at Google Sunnyvale Tech Corner Campus in California, where industry leaders, network architects and administrators, developers and engineers will convene.
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  • Linux Kernel 4.4.16 LTS Released with Over 150 Changes, It's Already in Solus
  • Linux Kernel 4.6.5 Has Numerous Nouveau Improvements, ARM and ARM64 Fixes
  • Linux Kernel 4.6.5 and Kernel 4.4.16 released
    Just after a couple of weeks,Linux Kernel 4.6.4 and 4.6.15 release was announced,here comes the next release in both series of Linux kernel 4.6 and 4.4. Both the releases are to bring fixes and improvements in performance.There are some workarounds made in GPU drivers,Wireless,USB,Sound and others can be checked in the change log,Of Course. In the Kernel 4.6.5 there are 220 files changed,1754 files inserted newly and 998 deletations are made.On the other hand,Linux kernel 4.4.16 has 156 files are changed,1475 insetations and 845 deletations are notified as per the announcement.
  • Linux 4.7 now out with enhanced security and advanced graphics support

BSD Leftovers

  • FreeBSD Q2'2016: EFI Improvements, Prepping For FreeBSD 11.0, Package Updates
    For FreeBSD fans not closely following its development on a daily basis, the FreeBSD project has released their Q2'2016 quarterly status report that covers various activities going on around this BSD operating system project.
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    The EuroBSDCon 2016 talks and schedule have been released, and oh are we in for a treat! All three major BSD's have a "how we made the network go fast" talk, nearly every single timeslot has a networking related talk, and most of the non-networking talks look fantastic as well.

Security News

  • Linux Security Automation at Scale in the Cloud
    Ten years ago it didn’t seem like Linux growth could increase any faster. Then, in 2006, Amazon launched Amazon Web Services (AWS). Linux growth went from linear to exponential. AWS competitors sprang up and were acquired by IBM, Microsoft, and other big players, accelerating Linux expansion even more. Linux became the platform of choice for the private cloud. But this movement wasn’t confined to the cloud. A rush to create Linux applications and services spilled over to traditional on premises. Linux had evolved from that obscure thing people ran web servers on to the backbone operating system of the majority of IT.
  • Don’t want to get hacked? Close your laptop.
    My friends often leave their computers open and unlocked. I tell them they should probably get in the habit of locking their computers, but they don’t listen to me. So I’ve created a simple project to hack my friends and show them the importance of computer security. All I need to do is wait for them to leave their computer unlocked for a few seconds, open up their terminal, and type a single, short command.
  • Citibank IT guy deliberately wiped routers, shut down 90% of firm’s networks across America
    It was just after 6pm on December 23, 2013, and Lennon Ray Brown, a computer engineer at the Citibank Regents Campus in Irving, Texas, was out for revenge. Earlier in the day, Brown – who was responsible for the bank’s IT systems – had attended a work performance review with his supervisor. It hadn’t gone well. Brown was now a ticking time bomb inside the organisation, waiting for his opportunity to strike. And with the insider privileges given to him by the company, he had more of an opportunity to wreak havoc than any external hacker.
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