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About Tux Machines

Friday, 06 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Smart Package Manager study cases: inconclusive!

Filed under
Software

Smart PM is advocated by a lot of people for using it instead of APT, YUM, YaST2, or whatever else. I tried it once and it worked well. However, I was not impressed that much. Besides, where's the proof it actually performs better?

IOSN releases free open standards book

Filed under
OSS

Many governments and organisations are moving towards open standards and frameworks. To assist users in understanding open standards the International Open Source Network (IOSN) has released FOSS: Open Standards, the latest in its series of "e-Primer" books.

SCO will appeal the gutting of its lawsuit against IBM

Filed under
Legal

Utah's SCO Group is appealing a federal magistrate's gutting of its $5 billion lawsuit against IBM, hoping to salvage the tens of millions of dollars it has spent litigating the case over the past three years.

Which linux distro..?

Filed under
Linux

I’ve been using linux for at least four years now, and I’ve tried out most of the top distributions available. This guide is for noobs to decide which distribution of linux to use.

Shuttleworth discusses the future of open source

Filed under
OSS

Despite being on record as disliking public speaking, Mark Shuttleworth was in Dublin last month to give the keynote speech at this year's ApacheCon Europe. His theme was the future direction of open source software (OSS), and the issues developers should focus on to ensure the OSS movement’s continued success.

Book Review: A Practical Guide to Red Hat Linux

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Reviews

I'm overwhelmed. This is the book I wanted when I started learning about Unix. OK, Linux didn't exist then, but if it had existed, and if I were sticking my toes in it, this would have been THE book.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: Lotus Notes, Firefix 2, Win98, Sun

We fondly remember Sam Palmisano's promise more than two years ago to have all IBM employees running Linux on their desktops the end of 2005. We weren't surprised that the actual rollout was quietly swept under the carpet and did not occur.

What makes open-source developers tick?

Filed under
OSS

A doctoral thesis submitted to the University of Zurich in Switzerland has focused on the question of what makes developers of open-source software tick. The answer is not much of a surprise:

A first look at SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

The newest SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop, version 10, is so close to being done that you can almost taste it. Novell released the gold master last week to its partners, and the server version, SLES (SUSE Linux Enterprise Server), based on the same code, is also almost ready for release. This is an early review of the new version of SLED 10 (SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop).

Smart Package Manager: a better mousetrap

Filed under
Software

The Smart Package Manager hopes to beat the native package management applications for distributions like Red Hat, SUSE, and Debian at their own game. Still in beta, it has support for most major GNU/Linux package and repository formats. Smart introduces many innovative and useful ideas, but its killer feature is the algorithms it uses to select packages and versions.

KOffice Version 1.5.2 Released

Filed under
Software

The KOffice team is pleased to announce KOffice version 1.5.2. This is mainly a bugfix release but also contains numerous translation updates. Especially KWord, KSpread and Kexi have received critical bug fixes.

VMware Server Is Cooked And Ready For Tasting

Filed under
Software

VMware has made its server product generally available from Wednesday. The product, previously the paid-for GSX Server, has been free to download in beta form for months but is now cooked according to VMware.

Lotus Haters Gang Up On Notes for Linux

Filed under
Software

After Lotus announced the release of the Lotus Notes 7.0.1 stand-alone client for Linux, IBM Lotus Chief Ed Brill conceded that the reaction was mixed... Which was a modest bit of understatement.

Real-life Gundam robot runs on Linux

Filed under
Linux

Japan's National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (ASIT) has just unleashed the latest in a long line of bipedal robots to come out of the R&D labs of this country.

Two Linux PCs Power 12-Station Internet Café

Filed under
Linux

HP, Blueloop and Omni partnered to deliver a 12-station Internet café running off two standard HP desktop computers at an international GroupWise conference held in Telford, UK.

Using DesktopBSD

Filed under
Reviews
BSD

Like PC-BSD, DesktopBSD provides many features that will allow a complete Unix novice to start using the operating system immediately. Those already familiar with FreeBSD and the KDE desktop will recognize the tools underlying the GUI conveniences.

MySQL to draw curtain on older databases

Filed under
Software

MySQL has published its first "end of life" timetable for its open-source database and will no longer provide free updates for some older versions of the product starting next month, it said this week.

Debian Server restored after Compromise

Filed under
Security

One core Debian server has been reinstalled after a compromise and services have been restored. On July 12th the host gluck.debian.org has been compromised using a local root vulnerability in the Linux kernel. The intruder had access to the server using a compromised developer account.

n/a

Repairing ReiserFS file system with reiserfsck

Filed under
HowTos

We have already written about ext2/ext3 file repair using fsck and other utilities. Linux comes with different filesystems and different repair utilities. To repair a ReiserFS filesystem you need to reiserfsck command which is a checking tool for the ReiserFS filesystem (just like fsck command for ext2/ext3 file system).

Also: Shell script to watch the disk space

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • OpenSSL patches two high-severity flaws
    OpenSSL has released versions 1.0.2h and 1.0.1t of its open source cryptographic library, fixing multiple security vulnerabilities that can lead to traffic being decrypted, denial-of-service attacks, and arbitrary code execution. One of the high-severity vulnerabilities is actually a hybrid of two low-risk bugs and can cause OpenSSL to crash.
  • Linux Foundation Advances Security Efforts via Badging Program
    The Linux Foundation Core Infrastructure Initiative's badging program matures, as the first projects to achieve security badges are announced.
  • Linux Foundation tackles open source security with new badge program
  • WordPress Plugin ‘Ninja Forms’ Security Vulnerability
    FOSS Force has just learned from Wordfence, a security company that focuses on the open source WordPress content management platform, that a popular plugin used by over 500,000 sites, Ninja Forms, contains serious security vulnerabilities.
  • Preparing Your Network for the IoT Revolution
    While there is no denying that IP-based connectivity continues to become more and more pervasive, this is not a fundamentally new thing. What is new is the target audience is changing and connectivity is becoming much more personal. It’s no longer limited to high end technology consumers (watches and drones) but rather, it is showing up in nearly everything from children’s toys to kitchen appliances (yes again) and media devices. The purchasers of these new technology-enabled products are far from security experts, or even security aware. Their primary purchasing requirements are ease of use.
  • regarding embargoes
    Yesterday I jumped the gun committing some patches to LibreSSL. We receive advance copies of the advisory and patches so that when the new OpenSSL ships, we’re ready to ship as well. Between the time we receive advance notice and the public release, we’re supposed to keep this information confidential. This is the embargo. During the embargo time we get patches lined up and a source tree for each cvs branch in a precommit state. Then we wait with our fingers on the trigger. What happened yesterday was I woke up to a couple OpenBSD developers talking about the EBCDIC CVE. Oh, it’s public already? Check the OpenSSL git repo and sure enough, there are a bunch of commits for embargoed issues. Pull the trigger! Pull the trigger! Launch the missiles! Alas, we didn’t look closely enough at the exact issues fixed and had missed the fact that only low severity issues had been made public. The high severity issues were still secret. We were too hasty.
  • Medical Equipment Crashes During Heart Procedure Because of Antivirus Scan [Ed: Windows]
    A critical medical equipment crashed during a heart procedure due to a timely scan triggered by the antivirus software installed on the PC to which the said device was sending data for logging and monitoring.
  • Hotel sector faces cybercrime surge as data breaches start to bite
    Since 2014, things have become a lot more serious with a cross section of mostly US hotels suffering major breaches during Point-of-Sale (POS) terminals. Panda Security lists a string of attacks on big brands including on Trump Hotels, Hilton Worldwide, Hyatt, Starwood, Rosen Hotels & Resorts as well two separate attacks on hotel management outfit White Lodging and another on non-US hotel Mandarin Oriental.

Android Leftovers

today's howtos