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Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Distros & the ‘Except When We Don’t’ Syndrome Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 7:50pm
Story QEMU 2.2 Moves Closer To Release With Many New Features Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 7:45pm
Story 4MLinux Media Edition 10.1 Beta Features Flash Player Support Out of the Box Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 4:27pm
Story Google Cloud Platform Live: Introducing Container Engine, Cloud Networking and much more Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 4:23pm
Story Canonical Drops Ubuntu 14.10 Dedicated Images for Apple Hardware Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 4:16pm
Story The Second Enterprise Open Source Revolution Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 4:10pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 2:00pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 1:59pm
Story INTERVIEW: FLORIAN EFFENBERGER Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 1:08pm
Story Salix Live 14.1 Is a Light Slackware-Based OS with a Windows Vibe Rianne Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 1:01pm

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Review

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reviews.cnet.com: Dell's entry into the Netbook market means its time to take these low-cost, low-power PCs seriously. The Inspiron Mini 9 is an excellent example of the form, if not radically different from the competition.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • How to create an ubuntu 8.04.1 boot floppy

  • Howto select Per-user Editor in Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid)
  • Use LatencyTOP to pinpoint latency
  • Ubuntu Disk Quotas
  • Naming Conventions for Hard Disks and Partitions
  • Spin openSUSE Live CD or USB stick image “easily”
  • XFCE, SLiM, PAM, and Jack
  • What Windows Or New Users Need To Know About Ubuntu
  • Building Chrome with Debian (or getting out the polishing cloth at least)
  • Controlling Internet access with SafeSquid
  • Gnac - A Simple Program to Convert Audio Files
  • Get involved: Gentoo Bugday coming up Saturday
  • Can Dell and Vodafone play leapfrog with Linux?
  • Yahoo.com promoting Firefox 3
  • The Linux laptop goes to school
  • End of an era: Dell may dump its factories
  • Has the head of MySQL left Sun?
  • Mandriva Linux 2009 RC1 - Camelopard Screenshots
  • Linux Caffe, 326 Harbord Street
  • Howdy World! A Funny Unix/Linux Programming Joke

Closing X Developer Summit 2008 Notes

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Aside from the short X Server 1.6 release plans and clarifying UXA+EXA, there are a few other notes to share from this afternoon's X.Org/Intel talk.

KVM vs. Xen vs. VMware. Is it a Hypervisor War?

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: For years, Xen and VMware have been the virtualization technologies of choice for open source operating systems vendors. With Red Hat's acquisition of Qumranet yesterday and its competing Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) open source hypervisor the winds of change may be blowing, or not.

Announcing the Ubuntu Manpage Repository

Filed under
Ubuntu

dustinkirkland.wordpress: I love the Ubuntu Wiki, and I think the Official Ubuntu Documentation is great! These are two important reasons why Ubuntu has been such a successful Linux distribution. But at the end of the day, I’m a terminal-and-manpage kind of a guy.

Hacker-friendly karaoke PMP runs Linux

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: A Taiwanese electronic system design company has developed an open-source MP3, video, and Karaoke player that runs Linux 2.6.x. Cool-Idea Technology's Cool-Karaoke uses a 400MHz ARM920t processor, includes 4GB of flash and a 320x240 display, and supports customization with a freely downloadable toolchain and source code.

Wizard Boot Camp, Part Nine: (More) Utilities You Should Know

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: We’re getting near the end of our series of tips that wizards should know. Thing time we’re covering the second in a sub-series about Linux utilities. There’s more about ln, including some examples of how to use a data file and a combination of other utilities. And we’ll see some examples of what the tiny editor sed can do — like editing email as it pours through a mail server.

intrepid alpha-5 released

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: The Ubuntu developers are moving very quickly to bring you the latest and greatest software the Open Source community has to offer. With "Intrepid Ibex" Alpha 5 come some new features as well as lots of bug fixes.

First look: Firefox 3.1 alpha 2 officially released

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica.com: Mozilla has officially announced the availability of the second Firefox 3.1 alpha. This release includes support for the highly-anticipated HTML 5 "video" element and a handful of other features that move the browser forward.

Selling GNU/Linux in a box

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Eight years ago, computer stores stocked a choice of GNU/Linux distributions -- established ones like Caldera, Red Hat, and SUSE, and newcomers like Corel, Progeny, and Stormix. Now, only Ubuntu and openSUSE offer box sets, and both face challenges that other distributions found unsolvable.

openSUSE 11.0: Handles Server Duty Well

Filed under
SUSE

linuxplanet.com: OpenSUSE 11.0 does a great job on the desktop, but it shines equally as bright in the server role. Everything you need to set up most any type of server comes on the OpenSUSE 11.0 installation DVD. The trick is narrowing down the options to the ones you'll really need.

Who’s going to pay for open source software?

Filed under
OSS

openlogic.com/blogs: This week theme has been "who's going to pay for open source?" It's shown up in a number of blogs, like Matt Asay's. In several blog posts he's said things like "Who will pay for open source in the future?" and "Someone has to pay for this stuff, and it's not going to be governments." Roberto Gallopini's post quotes Larry Augustine saying that customers need to be educated on the value of open source. I'm sorry, it's just not the simple.

Java Sound & Music Software for Linux, Part 1

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: Over the years I've noted that Java-based music and sound applications have increased in number and quality, yet no comprehensive list or summaries have covered these advances. And so at long last I present this survey of music and sound applications that require Java.

Opera 9.60 beta 1 RC

Filed under
Software

opera.com: Thats right, Opera 9.6 is soon ready for its first beta flight. We have now frozen all features and only critical fixes go in. Really soon now, the beta will be released, but we want more feedback from you guys before we do so.

Building Trust in Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: When running a Linux system, a user relies on the creator of the Linux distribution to provide them with a stable, fast, secure and bug-free experience. But given the experience of recent weeks, it may be worth considering how that user makes sure that's what they get.

Fedora 8 and 9 updates status

Filed under
Linux

redhat.com: Today we've reached a major milestone in this progress. We have done a successful compose of all the existing and as of yesterday pending updates for Fedora 8 and Fedora 9, all signed with our new keys. These updates will soon hit mirrors in a new set of directory locations.

Kick Linux To The Curb?

Filed under
Linux

intranetjournal.com: Recently I found myself presented with the possibility of switching to Apple's OS X. Keeping in mind that I already have a Mac in our home in the form of my wife's computer, the idea of me using it did get me thinking. What would it take for me to completely abandon Linux and return to the world of closed source operating systems?

How free software makes money

Filed under
OSS

brajeshwar.com: Many big corps support Free and Open Source Software in different ways. Everything’s strictly business, just that the company doesn’t need to burn down half the Amazon Rainforest to do it.

Ubuntu Server in a Cardboard Box

Filed under
Ubuntu

hitechsquad.com: I have an upcoming project which requires a Ubuntu server and after doing some PC repairs and upgrades I had a few bits left over.

Sidux: Debian Unstable, not so unstable

Filed under
Linux

tuxtoday.wordpress: I recently got myself a new laptop. After having tried Fedora, Mint, and Debian Etch on it, I decided to go the Debian Sid route.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Comment: Many happy returns to open source
    Twenty years ago the phrase “open source” was first used and the development of software – and hardware – was changed forever. Very few designers today will not use some element of open source software in their development projects.
  • Percona Unveils Full Conference Session Schedule for the Annual Percona Live Open Source Database Conference 2018
  • Worth seeing in Barcelona: Open source for white box vRAN solutions
    News this week from cloud and carrier infrastructure platform company Kontron builds on our earlier coverage of the emerging virtual radio access network (vRAN); a promising technology that could help the evolution to 5G by maximising available bandwidth while lowering costs. The market for open vRAN solutions is gaining wider acceptance as operators seek more cost-effective approaches to network architectures and deployment. According to analyst firm Research and Markets, the growth of the vRAN market is expected to grow at a CAGR of approximately 125 per cent during the next three years.
  • Barcelona is the first city council to join the FSFE's "Public Money? Public Code!" campaign
  • Earlham Institute releases open source software to help identify gene families
    Researchers at Earlham Institute (EI) have released ‘GeneSeqToFamily’, an open-source Galaxy workflow that helps scientists to find gene families based on the ‘EnsemblCompara GeneTrees’ pipeline. Published in Gigascience, the open source Galaxy workflow aims to make researchers job of finding find gene families much easier.
  • 3 reasons to say 'no' in DevOps
    DevOps, it has often been pointed out, is a culture that emphasizes mutual respect, cooperation, continual improvement, and aligning responsibility with authority. Instead of saying no, it may be helpful to take a hint from improv comedy and say, "Yes, and..." or "Yes, but...". This opens the request from the binary nature of "yes" and "no" toward having a nuanced discussion around priority, capacity, and responsibility.
  • 5 rules for having genuine community relationships
    As I wrote in the first article of this three-part series on the power and importance of communities, building a community of passionate and committed members is difficult. When we launched the NethServer community, we realized early that to play the open source game, we needed to follow the open source rules. No shortcuts. We realized we had to convert the company in an open organization and start to work out in the open.
  •  
  • Rust Typestates
    A long time ago, the Rust language was a language with typestate. Officially, typestates were dropped long before Rust 1.0. In this entry, I’ll get you in on the worst kept secret of the Rust community: Rust still has typestates.
  • It's Time To Do CMake Right
    Not so long ago I got the task of rethinking our build system. The idea was to evaluate existing components, dependencies, but most importantly, to establish a superior design by making use of modern CMake features and paradigms. Most people I know would have avoided such enterprise at all costs, but there is something about writing find modules that makes my brain release endorphins. I thought I was up for an amusing ride. Boy was I wrong.

OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability

  • OpenBSD Gets Mitigated For Meltdown CPU Vulnerability
    A few days back FreeBSD 11 stable was mitigated for Meltdown (and Spectre vulnerabilities), which came more than one month after these nasty CPU vulnerabilities were disclosed while DragonFlyBSD was quickly mitigated and the first of the BSDs to do so. While OpenBSD is known for its security features and focus, only today did it land its initial Meltdown mitigation.
  • Meltdown fix committed by guenther@

    Meltdown mitigation is coming to OpenBSD. Philip Guenther (guenther@) has just committed a diff that implements a new mitigation technique to OpenBSD: Separation of page tables for kernel and userland. This fixes the Meltdown problems that affect most CPUs from Intel. Both Philip and Mike Larkin (mlarkin@) spent a lot of time implementing this solution, talking to various people from other projects on best approaches.

    In the commit message, Philip briefly describes the implementation [...]

France Proposes Software Security Liability For Manufacturers, Open Source As Support Ends

It sometimes seems as though barely a week can go by without yet another major software-related hardware vulnerability story. As manufacturers grapple with the demands of no longer building simple appliances but instead supplying them containing software that may expose itself to the world over the Internet, we see devices shipped with insecure firmware and little care for its support or updating after the sale. The French government have a proposal to address this problem that may be of interest to our community, to make manufacturers liable for the security of a product while it is on the market, and with the possibility of requiring its software to be made open-source at end-of-life. In the first instance it can only be a good thing for device security to be put at the top of a manufacturer’s agenda, and in the second the ready availability of source code would present reverse engineers with a bonanza. Read more

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