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Tuesday, 24 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mandriva reports its 3rd Quarter results

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com: Mandriva today reported its financial and operating results for the third quarter 2008. Turnover for the quarter is 0.83 million Euros, trading revenue is 1.04 million Euros, costs are 1.67 million Euros and the operating loss is 0.64 million Euros.

Three things I like about Ubuntu Intrepid, and one I don’t

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: Intrepid. There is very little evidence of the “wow” factor that made early Ubuntu releases so exciting. Unless of course you dig a little deeper. There are three that really stand out for me.

Ubuntu for the Holidays

Filed under
Ubuntu

practical-tech.com: You’ve already got Ubuntu on your computer so why not have some Ubuntu under your Christmas tree-or Hanukkah bush, Ubuntu’s for everyone-as well.

20+ Firefox Plugins to Enhance Your YouTube Experience

Filed under
Moz/FF

mashable.com: There is no arguing that YouTube is the most popular video sharing site out there, but that isn’t to say that there aren’t things about it that annoy users. There are a wide array of plugins for Firefox to make the YouTube user experience that much better. Here are over 20.

Also: Trick Out Your Firefox Browser with Style

MSI GeForce 9800GT 512MB

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: For Linux desktop users interested in a mid-range discrete graphics card there are more choices than ever before with NVIDIA continuing to release new stable Linux drivers as they have done for many years. We recently looked at AMD's new ATI Radeon HD 4830 mid-range graphics card, but in this article we are comparing it to the NVIDIA GeForce 9800GT.

OSS Reloaded

Filed under
Software

yatsite.blogspot: 2008 was without doubt a very exciting year. Open Source keeps stirring the still waters of IT industry. So, let's see which major applications made major releases this year:

Business vs. FOSS: Six Pressure Points

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: The question of whether business can co-exist with free and open source software (FOSS) was settled long ago. It can, and not only successful companies like Red Hat but also the willingness of venture capitalists to fund FOSS business models proves the case.

The Microsoft-Novell Linux deal: Two years later

Filed under
SUSE

infoworld.com: Two years ago this month, Microsoft forged its controversial partnership with Novell that, among other things, had the two companies agreeing not to sue each other over intellectual property issues, in part to protect Suse Linux users over any patent litigation from Microsoft. Just how well has that deal worked out?

The Linux Licensing Labyrinth

Filed under
OSS

linuxinsider.com: The land of open source software is awash in an often confusing array of various licenses and rules regarding what is and is not allowed once someone has written a piece of code. It's enough to scare some vendors away from FOSS altogether.

First Experience of Linux Mint

Filed under
Linux

cikguafiq.blogspot: I am not the most experienced of Linux users, deep down a am a Windows fanboy. However I have an old laptop that is generally useless with anything other than browsing the Internet or doing some basic work. It was never going to be a gaming machine so I figured Linux offers everything I need + it should perform better than XP.

Setting Up ProFTPd + TLS On Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

FTP is a very insecure protocol because all passwords and all data are transferred in clear text. By using TLS, the whole communication can be encrypted, thus making FTP much more secure. This article explains how to set up ProFTPd with TLS on an Ubuntu 8.10 server.

Linux: for all things great and small

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Most of us get a chance to see Linux in action at the desktop or single server level. Some of us use Linux on mobiles and other little gizmos without even realising that the penguin is doing the lifting.

Zenwalking

Filed under
Linux

shinywankenobi.wordpress: I’ve tried just about every Linux distro you could mention over the years. In my partial boredom I decided to flip through Distrowatch’s pages and see what I could find to play with. I want something different. Zenwalk… Zenwalk, where the Hell have you been all my life?

Review: Opera Mini 4.2 Beta

Filed under
Software

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: USING a mobile phone to access the worldwide web has rarely been a pleasant experience. But then along came Oslo-based Opera with their Mini 4.2 browser - and all that changed.

Blown Away by Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

homecomputerguide.com: I’ve been working on Windows computers for nearly two decades and have never been compelled to use anything else. But a recent experience with something called Linux Ubuntu has turned my computer world view on its head!

How to use OpenOffice.org as a Two Pane Outliner

Filed under
HowTos

So, although OpenOffice.org does not act as a one pane outliner, we can set it up as a two pane outliner. This can be very useful for structuring long documents, or keeping scraps of disparate information in one handy file.

To do this requires two things: the use of the Navigator, and the use of headline styles when structuring your document. Let’s start up OpenOffice.org Writer and see how this works.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Gartner: 85 percent of companies using open source

  • Kontact and Citadel - experiences
  • USB 3.0 debuts
  • How “why” is the most important question open source vendors should ask
  • Clueless Linux User
  • British Council using Drupal
  • Norway Pledges Funds for Government Open Source Usage
  • The importance of open source, from a 17 year olds point of view
  • Linuxhater, failed astroturfer?
  • Cloud Apps, Netbooks and the Mobile Internet: Flash, Bang, Fizzle
  • What if Sun fails with open source?
  • Testing Mandriva
  • Using Ubuntu Linux at the American International School
  • Slumberland rests easy after move away from proprietary Unix
  • kerneloops.org records its 100,000th oops
  • Running Linux and z/OS on a single mainframe poses no problem
  • How to see when you should not upgrade
  • Kernel Log: New graphics drivers and Linux versions: Dom0 patches for 2.6.29?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Getting Gnome Volume Manager to Play Nice

  • Crafting offers and invoice documents with Kraft
  • Find all SSH Hosts
  • Setting Up Parental Controls in Ubuntu
  • Easier file renaming with renameutils
  • Improve Your Intelligence with Brain Workshop
  • Add windows codecs to Ubuntu Intrepid 8.10

Coherence brings UPnP to GNOME

Filed under
Software

arstechnica.com: Coherence is a Python library that implements UPnP and the Digital Living Network Alliance standard, protocols that facilitate interoperability between networked media devices.

Unemployed? Five reasons to build your resume with FOSS contributions

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: It looks like we’ve gone from speculating whether we’re headed into recession depression. Yihong Ding, over on the Thinking Space blog,predicts that we’ll have a “Golden Age” of the Web. If that’s the case, shouldn’t we be expecting a “Golden Age” for open source, with all the idle programmers and IT folks at home with time on their hands?

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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Open source movement to disrupt NFV and SDN marketplace
    According to Technology Business Research’s 1Q18 NFV/SDN Telecom Market Landscape report, open-source groups will spur NFV and SDN adoption by establishing industry standards that foster interoperability among a broader range of solution providers.
  • First look at Google Chrome's UI design refresh
    Users of Google Chrome Canary, the cutting edge version of Google's web browser, have a chance to get a sneak peek of a user interface design refresh that Google may plan to launch in all versions of Chrome eventually. The feature is hidden behind a flag currently but that is a common practice by Google; the company uses flags to hide future features from the general population. While there is no guarantee that features will land in Chrome one day, it is often the case that Google uses experimental flags to prepare the wider release.
  • Mozilla Thunderbird: Thunderbird April News Update: GSoC, 60 Beta 4, New Thunderbird Council
    Due to lots of news coming out of the Thunderbird project, I’ve decided to combine three different blog posts I was working on into one news update that gives people an idea of what has been happening in the Thunderbird community this month.
  • New Mozilla Poll: Support for Net Neutrality Grows, Trust in ISPs Dips
    “Today marks the ostensible effective date for the FCC’s net neutrality repeal order, but it does not mark the end of net neutrality,” says Denelle Dixon, Mozilla COO. “And not just because some procedural steps remain before the official overturning of the rules — but because Mozilla and other supporters of net neutrality are fighting to protect it in the courts and in Congress.” Also today: Mozilla is publishing results from a nationwide poll that reveals where Americans stand on the issue. Our survey reinforces what grassroots action has already demonstrated: The repeal contradicts most Americans’ wishes. The nation wants strong net neutrality rules.
  • Another Summer of Code with Smack
    I’m very happy to announce that once again I will participate in the Summer of Code. Last year I worked on OMEMO encrypted Jingle Filetransfer for the XMPP client library Smack. This year, I will once again contribute to the Smack project. A big thanks goes out to Daniel Gultsch and Conversations.im, who act as an umbrella organization.
  • NOAA’s Mission Toward Open Data Sharing
    The goal of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is to put all of its data — data about weather, climate, ocean coasts, fisheries, and ecosystems – into the hands of the people who need it most. The trick is translating the hard data and making it useful to people who aren’t necessarily subject matter experts, said Edward Kearns, the NOAA’s first ever data officer, speaking at the recent Open Source Leadership Summit (OSLS).   NOAA’s mission is similar to NASA’s in that it is science based, but “our mission is operations; to get the quality information to the American people that they need to run their businesses, to protect their lives and property, to manage their water resources, to manage their ocean resources,” said Kearns, during his talk titled “Realizing the Full Potential of NOAA’s Open Data.” He said that NOAA was doing Big Data long before the term was coined and that the agency has way too much of it – to the tune of 30 petabytes in its archives with another 200 petabytes of data in a working data store. Not surprisingly, NOAA officials have a hard time moving it around and managing it, Kearns said.
  • Document Freedom Day Singapore 2018
    On the 28 March 2018, Fedora Ambassadors organized Document Freedom Day in Singapore. Document Freedom Day is a day which like-minded folks who care about libre document formats gather to discuss and raise awareness of libre document formats. Libre document formats help reduce restrictions and vendor lock-ins. They are also an important tool that enables our right to read freely.

How to Run Android Apps and Games on Linux

Want to run Android apps on Linux? How about play Android games? Several options are available, but the one that works the best is Anbox, a useful tool that runs your favorite Android apps on Linux without emulation. Here’s how to get it up and running on your Linux PC today. Read more Also: 8 Best Android Apps For Kids To Help Children Learn With Fun | 2018 Edition

SUSE: openSUSE Tumbleweed and SUSE in HPC

  • Krita, Linux Kernel, KDEConnect Get Updated in Tumbleweed
    There have been a few openSUSE Tumbleweed snapshots released in the past two weeks that brought some new features and fixes to users. This blog will go over the past two snapshots. The last snapshot, 20180416, had several packages updated. The adobe-sourceserifpro-fonts package updated to version 2.000; with the change, the fonts were refined to make the Semibold and Bold heavier. Both dbus-1 and dbus-1-x11 were updated to 1.12.6, which fixed some regreations introduced in version 1.10.18 and 1.11.0. The gtk-vnc 0.7.2 package deprecated the manual python2 binding, which will be deleted in the next release, in favor of GObject introspection. Notifications that caused a crash were fixed in kdeconnect-kde 1.3.0. The 4.16.2 Linux Kernel made ip_tunnel, ipv6, ip6_gre, ip6_tunnel and vti6 better to validate user provided tunnel names. Due to a build system failure, not all 4.16.2 binaries were built correctly; this will be resolved in the 20180417 snapshot, which will be released shortly. Krita 4.0.1 had multiple fixes from its major version upgrade. The visual diff and merge tool meld 3.19.0 added new features like a new per-pane status bar with selectors for syntax highlighting and text encoding. Python Imaging Library python-Pillow 5.1.0 removed the freetype-2.9.patch and YaST had several packages with a version bump.
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise High Performance Computing in the SLE 15 Beta Program!
  • SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 Prepares HPC Module
    The upcoming release of SUSE Linux Enterprise 15 is offering an HPC (High Performance Computing) module for development, control, and compute nodes. Today that SLE15-HPC module is now available in beta.

OPNsense 18.1.6

For more than 3 years now, OPNsense is driving innovation through modularising and hardening the code base, quick and reliable firmware upgrades, multi-language support, fast adoption of upstream software updates as well as clear and stable 2-Clause BSD licensing. Read more