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Monday, 21 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Five useful command one liners

Filed under
HowTos

commandline.org.uk: I had a browse through my shell history (history | less), and there are some interesting commands that I have used recently. The really experienced command line warriors among you will probably know them already, but it never hurts to have a reminder.

Linux Foundation Looks to 2009

Filed under
Linux

itbusinessedge.com: As we begin to close the books on 2008 and look into the proverbial crystal ball for open source in the new year, I thought the Linux Foundation was a logical place to start. So I asked LF Marketing what the top five open source predictions would be.

How to export your Firefox 3.0 full profile to Firefox 3.1

Filed under
HowTos

This article explains how to move a full profile (addons, themes, cookies, browsing history, passwords and so on) from Firefox 3.0.x to Firefox 3.1.x beta or any other version, but it also works for synchronizing Firefox on 2 different computers or backing up a full profile of Firefox.

Read about moving a FF 3.0 profile to FF 3.1x here.

unrelated downtime

Filed under
Site News

Well, just as I posted the "all is well" blog entry, we suffered a power outage here.

How To Chroot Apache 2 Web Server Under Red Hat / CentOS Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software
Security

A chroot on Red Hat / CentOS / Fedora Linux operating changes the apparent disk root directory for the Apache process and its children. Once this is done attacker or other php / perl / python scripts cannot access or name files outside that directory. This is called a "chroot jail" for Apache. You should never ever run a web server without jail. There should be privilege separation between web server and rest of the system.

OS shoot-out: Windows vs. Mac OS X vs. Linux

Filed under
OS

infoworld.com: The Mac's been on a roll, both due to its highly regarded Mac OS X Leopard operating system and to an unhappy reception for Microsoft's Windows Vista. The result: For the first time in memory, the Mac's market share has hit 9.1 percent, and Windows' market share has dipped below 90 percent. (Linux distributions make up the rest.)

The Other Secret to Red Hat’s Success: A Magazine (No Joke)

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: What’s the biggest secret to Red Hat’s success in a down economy? Plenty of pundits think it’s Linux and JBoss open source middleware. But The VAR Guy has another theory:

Alan Cox and the End of an Era

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: In the beginning, free software was an activity conducted on the margins - using spare time on a university's computers, or the result of lonely bedroom hacking. One of the key moments in the evolution of free software was when hackers began to get jobs.

The future of open source

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: There's no question that the open source community is a passionate one -- and one with significant influence on technology directions and options. We're way past the days when people asked if Linux or Apache was safe to depend on in business. Open source is now a mainstream part of the technology fabric. 11 leaders outline the challenges and opportunities ahead.

BREAKING: compiz++ branch hits git

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Ladies and Gentlemen what you are seeing here may well be the future of compiz as we know it, in a new compiz branch called compiz++ which allows for really neat things like:

GoblinX Releases G:Micro 3.0.beta01

Filed under
Linux

GoblinX just released the first beta of the next stable release.

"Merry Christmas!! The GoblinX Project is proud to announce the first beta of the next stable release. The G:Micro 3.0 beta 01 is released."

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sudo: Running a Command with Root Priviledges

  • Epic Troll #2: BN continues to twist the facts
  • openSUSE Download Numbers
  • VLC Media Player To Receive VDPAU Support
  • Save time managing multiple systems with Parallel SSH
  • Boss by day, gamer by night: Tech leaders' favorite video games
  • Quickly get up to 5% more disk space from your ext3 volumes
  • How to set the date on your Linux machine
  • GNOME 2.25.3 Released A Week Late
  • How fast is your X performing?
  • Autodistro?
  • OpenSUSE 11.1 and nVidia == AWESOME!!
  • TED follows Negroponte to Colombia to deliver GNU/Linux XO laptops
  • Bill Gates – Enigmatic As Ever!
  • Mozilla Developer News Dec 23
  • MySQL: Find Out Which Table is Consuming Resources
  • Sabayon 4 & future Entropy

What If Windows Told You What It Was Really Doing

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

linuxloop.com: Reading about Canonicals’ plans for application notifications, I got to wondering if the operating system could tell you what it was doing, too. Then I started wondering what would happen if Windows told you what it was really doing…

A Penguin Deathmatch? Fedora 10 vs. Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Linux

tarnaeluin.wordpress: After several weeks of trying I finally had to give in to my sweaty and now pruney hands. I could not get the heat out of my Ubuntu install on my T60p laptop. Last night I grabbed the Fedora 10 ISO.

ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope

  • Ubuntu Enrolls At Cornell College
  • Solution for Ubuntu 8.10 and RTL8187B WiFi problem
  • Singapore supports Ubuntu!
  • bullies of linux
  • Notifications, Popups and U
  • Learning from Ubuntu and Canonical
  • Vista is dying slowly. Apple is a dead end. But Ubuntu needs to grow up.

Bored (or Broke) on the Holidays? Develop a Funambol GNOME Evolution Plugin

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: The mission, should you choose to accept it: Develop a GUI-plugin, based on SyncEvolution to easily, visually sync Evolution to the Funambol SyncML servers.

The top 5 Linux myths: Why you shouldn’t fear the penguin

Filed under
Linux

gadgetell.com: As Christmas approaches and Hanukkah comes along to the later days, there’s a chance you might be expecting a new computer, or perhaps even a netbook. Now, what to the do with the old computer?

Oh Its Beautiful

Filed under
MDV

lazytechguy.com: These were the exact words from my wife's mouth when she saw my Mandriva 2009 install. I choose the KDE 4 desktop which is eye-candy in itself, but Mandriva devs have put in a lot of effort and made KDE look much more adoring.

Also: Mandriva Linux and your Blackberry

IE's European share falls under 60%, Firefox's growth stalls

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Fewer than 60% of European Web users run Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer, while more than 31% have switched to Mozilla's Firefox, a French-based metrics company reported yesterday.

Intel Linux Graphics Performance Q4'08

phoronix.com: The past year has brought several invasive changes to the Intel Linux graphics stack with the introduction of the Graphics Execution Manager for GPU memory management within the kernel, support for the Direct Rendering Infrastructure 2, and kernel mode-setting finally getting ready to enter the limelight.

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10 Best Open Source Forum Software for Linux

A forum is a discussion platform where related ideas and views on a particular issue can be exchanged. You can setup a forum for your site or blog, where your team, customers, fans, patrons, audience, users, advocates, supporters, or friends can hold public or private discussions, as a whole or in smaller groups. If you are planning to launch a forum, and you can’t build your own software from scratch, you can opt for any of the existing forum applications out there. Some forum applications allow you to setup only a single discussion site on a single installation, while others support multiple-forums for a single installation instance. In this article, we will review 10 best open source forum software for Linux systems. By the end of this article, you will know exactly which open source forum software best suites your needs. Read more

(K)Ubuntu: Playing' Tennis and Dropping 32-bit

  • Tennibot is a really cool Ubuntu Linux-powered tennis ball collecting robot
    Linux isn't just a hobby --  the kernel largely powers the web, for instance. Not only is Linux on many web servers, but it is also found on the most popular consumer operating system in the world -- Android. Why is this? Well, the open source kernel scales very well, making it ideal for many projects. True, Linux's share of the desktop is still minuscule, but sometimes slow and steady wins the race -- watch out, Windows! A good example of Linux's scalability is a new robot powered by Linux which was recently featured on the official Ubuntu Blog. Called "Tennibot," the Ubuntu-powered bot seeks out and collects tennis balls. Not only does it offer convenience, but it can save the buyer a lot of money too -- potentially thousands of dollars per year as this calculator shows. So yeah, a not world-changing product, but still very neat nonetheless. In fact, it highlights that Linux isn't just behind boring nerdy stuff, but fun things too.
  • Kubuntu Drops 32-bit Install Images
    If you were planning to grab a Kubuntu 18.10 32-bit download this October you will want to look away now. Kubuntu has confirmed plans to join the rest of the Ubuntu flavour family and drop 32-bit installer images going forward. This means there will be no 32-bit Kubuntu 18.10 disc image available to download later this year.

Suitcase Computer Reborn with Raspberry Pi Inside

Fun fact, the Osborne 1 debuted with a price tag equivalent to about $5,000 in today’s value. With a gigantic 9″ screen and twin floppy drives (for making mix tapes, right?) the real miracle of the machine was its portability, something unheard of at the time. The retrocomputing trend is to lovingly and carefully restore these old machines to their former glory, regardless of how clunky or underpowered they are by modern standards. But sometimes they can’t be saved yet it’s still possible to gut and rebuild the machine with modern hardware, like with this Raspberry Pi used to revive an Osborne 1. Purists will turn their nose up at this one, and we admit that this one feels a little like “restoring” radios from the 30s by chucking out the original chassis and throwing in a streaming player. But [koff1979] went to a lot of effort to keep the original Osborne look and feel in the final product. We imagine that with the original guts replaced by a Pi and a small LCD display taking the place of the 80 character by 24 line CRT, the machine is less strain on the shoulder when carrying it around. (We hear the original Osborne 1 was portable in the same way that an anvil is technically portable.) The Pi runs an emulator to get the original CP/M experience; it even runs Wordstar. The tricky part about this build was making the original keyboard talk to the Pi, which was accomplished with an Arduino that translates key presses to USB. Read more