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Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.20.1 Released

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Linux

Greg KH and the -stable team have released the latest 2.6.20 series stable kernel. This bug-fix contains a single patch to fix a free wrong pointer bug in nfs/acl server support.

Jump into JUnit 4

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News

This tutorial guides you step-by-step through the fundamental concepts of JUnit 4, with emphasis on the new Java 5 annotations.

Xfce 4.4: The best lightweight desktop environment

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Software

For years, the lightweight Xfce has been a popular desktop environment for Linux distributions running on older hardware, thanks to its lower demand on resources as compared to KDE and GNOME; it's an ideal desktop for machines with less than 256MB of memory. Until recently, however, using Xfce was a little laborious, but with its latest release last month, Xfce is a much more usable desktop environment.

Ubuntu spurns Microsoft's advances

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Ubuntu

Products evolve and mature. Sometimes they even get better. So when I installed Vista, I thought it would only be fair if I also downloaded the latest version of Ubuntu, burned it onto CD and installed it on another machine.

How Novell Saved Millions With Open Source

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SUSE

How much money can a large enterprise save by migrating to open source from proprietary? In Novell's case, it's millions of dollars.

Ten Leading Open Source Innovators

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OSS

In the past, any open-source discussion centered on Linux, but now that Linux is a mature, stable operating system, the real innovation is happening elsewhere. As Illuminata analyst Gordon Haff notes, what’s most interesting is what happens when the open-source push collides with other technology trends. With those points in mind, here are ten leading commercial open-source innovators and the projects they’re working on.

A Windows Fanboy's Foray Into Linux: Fedora Core 6

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Reviews

Because of all my horrific previous experiences with distros from RedHat, I was really dreading the whole experience (and the response my review would provoke). But, to my chagrin, RedHat has cleaned up their act considerably.

A look at Slackware's package utilities

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Linux

Slackware Linux is the oldest surviving Linux distribution. Late last year the project marked 13 years of non-stop development with the release of Slackware 11.0. The distribution is best known for its no-frills, minimum customizations approach to applications like KDE. It's also notorious for its reluctance to switch to new version of several popular applications like Apache or GCC. No surprise then, that its package management system has seen little change over the years and is still available in just one flavor -- vanilla.

A good Linux kernel book for aspiring nerds

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Linux

It's time for me to come clean. I'm a Linux poseur. But a new Linux book, Greg Kroah-Hartman's Linux Kernel in a Nutshell, could help people like me get some real technical chops.

KDE at SCALE 5x

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KDE

KDE was once again well represented at the 2007 Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE 5x), demonstrating to show-goers why it is the most popular Linux desktop. There were talks, demonstrations from KDE developers and and thank yous in return.

OpenOffice 2.1

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Software

Lots of folks on the FOSS side of things tout OpenOffice (OO) as an alternative to Microsoft Office (M)). The basic argument is that OO, for basic functionality, is every bit as good as MO, but without the cost. Here's an example where OO fails to provide anything near the quality of MO.

The ‘Open' Tower of Babel

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Software

According to the Bible, there was a time when all those on earth spoke one language. And humanity, united by one language, started building the Tower of Babel to reach the heavens. As this was open defiance against God's wishes, He thought that the best way to stop these efforts would be to create confusion between humans by making everybody speak different languages so that no one could understand each other. But in the world of open source, GNOME and KDE are serving as the ‘open' tower of Babel.

The Participation Culture

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OSS

I am lurking on the OpenMoko mailing lists. This is an educational experience for me. Although I have participated in many heated discussions concerning Free software, I have never watched such a high-profile full-fledged Free software project start from the ground up. It's fascinating watching different sorts of geeks interact.

GNOME, KDE: Can't We All Just Get Along?

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Software

What is wrong with KDE 3.x? What is wrong with GNOME 2.8+? These seem to be the two questions arising from the recent revival of Linus vs. GNOME spat.

Book Review: Ubuntu Hacks

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Reviews

I recently got hold of a very nice book on Ubuntu called Ubuntu Hacks. Put in a nutshell, this book is a collection of around 100 tips and tricks which the authors choose to call hacks, which explain how to accomplish various tasks in Ubuntu Linux. The so called hacks range from down right ordinary to the other end of the spectrum of doing specialised things.

Yes Virginia, you can run Beryl alone

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HowTos

This post here and this one here got me thinking. The question — an often-asked one, I might add — is whether or not Fluxbox (or Openbox, for that matter) can run with the Beryl framework.

Converting music the easy way.

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Software

I recently had a task where I had to convert music from one format to another. I knew that there had to be an easy way to convert these music files so I forged on. Then I found it! The holy grail of music converters.

Search your IT data with Splunk

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Software

When something goes wrong in an IT server farm, it can take days for system administrators to find the root cause. Splunk is an enterprise-level search tool that can index logs and IT data, including server events, network events, and application events from one or more servers or network devices. You can then search data from across all your servers from just one place with a single browser- or console-based tool.

Ubuntu Linux error - fsck died with exit status 1

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HowTos

Recently I’ve noticed an error: fsck died with exit status 1 Now I need to find out which file system is causing error. After digging around boot process files I found a script called checkfs.sh located at /etc/init.d/ directory.

Convert Physical Windows Systems Into Virtual Machines To Be Run On A Linux Desktop

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Linux
Microsoft
HowTos

This article shows how you can convert a physical Windows system (XP, 2003, 2000, NT4 SP4+) into a VMware virtual machine with the free VMware Converter Starter. The resulting virtual machine can be run in the free VMware Player and VMware Server, and also in VMware Workstation and other VMware products.

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today's howtos

Linux Graphics

  • The RADV Radeon Vulkan Linux Driver Continues Picking Up Features
  • OpenChrome Maintainer Making Some Progress On VIA DRM Driver
    Independent developer Kevin Brace took over maintaining the OpenChrome DDX driver earlier this year to improve the open-source VIA Linux graphics support while over the summer he's slowly been getting up to speed on development of the OpenChrome DRM driver. The OpenChrome DRM driver was making progress while James Simmons was developing it a few years back, but since he left the project, it's been left to bit rot. It will take a lot of work even to get this previously "good" code back to working on the latest Linux 4.x mainline kernels given how DRM core interfaces have evolved in recent times.
  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

  • Linux 4.8 gets rc8
    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
  • Linux 4.8-rc8 Released: Linux 4.8 Next Weekend
  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more