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Sunday, 20 Aug 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux to the rescue! How Ubuntu can help a computer in distress Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 1:11pm
Story 143 French politicians pledge to support free software Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 1:06pm
Story Polishing the Rare Gem That Is Linux Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 12:27pm
Story Bodhi Linux 3.0.0 Beta Release Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 12:23pm
Story Web App Shortcuts To Get New Look in Chrome, Chrome OS Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 8:06am
Story The Development Of Ubuntu 14.10 Has Already Started Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 6:51am
Story Driving sustainable innovation in Governments with Open Source Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 6:44am
Story Ubuntu 14.04 On Amazon EC2: Xen PV vs. HVM Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 4:42am
Story Intel's P-State Driver Is Getting Better Tuned For Performance Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 1:41am
Story Xubuntu 14.04 LTS Rianne Schestowitz 28/04/2014 - 1:35am

Keep track of file name completions with Viewglob

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linux.com: The Viewglob command-line utility lets you see the files available for your shell command completions in a separate window, leaving your regular terminal window uncluttered.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Avant Window Navigator (Awn) 0.2.4 released

  • Lguest: A simple virtualization platform for Linux
  • Teacher accused of piracy fights Microsoft with open source
  • high-end and low-end desktop games
  • One Laptop Per Child: one trainer prepares
  • AMD Opens Up Their Performance Library
  • Linux Tip of the Day - Kill idle users
  • Choose Your Linux and Open Source Partner Carefully
  • Best Affordable Linux Computer Options

more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Your Perfect Ubuntu on Your Perfect Eee PC

  • Network Tip No.2: Enable Command
  • How to install Workaholic 0.1.0 on Ubuntu
  • Purge Memory
  • Screen Recording With RecordMyDesk
  • install / setup nvidia driver in fc8
  • Revealing Steganographic Content in Images
  • Public Key Authentication for SSH Made Easy
  • Howto: Configure the Update Manager in Ubuntu Linux
  • Trying out Firefox 3 Beta 3 on Ubuntu

Just what makes Linux tick

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Last time, we spoke about the Linux process scheduler and how it runs in the shadows swapping processes in and out of a running state so everyone gets a stab at the CPU. Today we’ll go over how the kernel keeps track of time and just what it means to do something in a jiffy.

Linux vs OpenSolaris…Again: The Q&A

Filed under
OS

redmonk: To be perfectly honest, I can think of several things I’d rather do than deconstruct yet another Linux vs OpenSolaris/Solaris flamewar. That said, this discussion is largely a waste of time for both sides, so unless you’re the kind of person that slows to observe traffic accidents in some detail, this is probably one to skip.

KDE Quickies: Nepomuk, Raptor, LProf, FOSDEM

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: The KDE e.V. welcomes a new Supporting Member, OSN Online Social Network GmbH, a company based in Düsseldorf in Germany. Supporting Members help the community with financial support, their contribution is used for example for sponsoring developer meetings you often read about on the Dot.

I Love Linux

Filed under
Linux

moultriecreek.us: I’m writing this post from my little EEE PC. We are doing a little Home Improvement - new flooring. In the meantime, our world is total chaos. My tiny laptop has been a life-saver through the chaos.

Linux on a stick part 3: Ubuntu 7.10 'simplified'

Filed under
Linux

blogbeebe.blogspot: Silly me. After reading about syslinux it suddenly dawned on me I was still making it too hard to transfer Ubuntu 7.10 LiveCD from CD to thumb drive. So here are simpler instructions for creating a bootable Ubuntu Live Thumb Drive under Linux.

Bank group takes Linux migration a step at a time

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Metropolitan Bank Group is a large conglomerate in Illinois, comprising 10 banks and $3 billion in assets. As Metropolitan acquired more banking interests, IT Director Tom Johnson needed to find a way to reduce costs and increase efficiency in the face of the company's rapid growth. The solution was a migration from Windows to Linux.

Dell charges more for Ubuntu than Vista

Filed under
Ubuntu

theinquirer.net: DELL HAPPILY ANNOUNCED a new Ubuntu-powered system a couple of days ago. The penguin posse was delighted, of course, until it found that the once-direct only seller seems to be charging more for machines sporting the open source OS than for those sporting Vista.

ODF standard editor calls for cooperation with OOXML

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com.au: The teams developing the OpenDocument Format (ODF) and Office Open XML (OOXML) standards should work together, evolving the two in parallel, the editor of the ODF standard said Tuesday in an open letter to the standards-setting community.

Blending photos with Enfuse

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Combining multiple photographs taken at different exposures lets you create a single image with good highlight and shadow detail. Tone-mapping applications like Qtpfsgui are the traditional way to do this, but tone-mapping is slow, difficult to use, and can produce strange visual artifacts. A new tool on the scene is easier, faster, and produces nicer results: Enfuse.

Fedora and the art of creating an inclusive community

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

Matt Asay: Earlier this year Fedora got a new community project leader. In February 2008 Paul Frields replaced Max Spevack, bringing a different perspective to Fedora's community management. I spent a half-hour with Paul today and probed into Fedora and the art of community, as well as some of the innovations in the pipe for Fedora 9.

Hans Reiser's Father Doing Courtroom Pushups; Warns of 'Techno-Geek SNM Crowd'

Filed under
Reiser

wired blog: The Hans Reiser murder trial drifted into the netherworld here Wednesday after the defendant's father took the stand, at times rambling uncontrollably and apologizing for it.

Who told you that reading a license is boring?

Filed under
Humor

sabayonlinux.org: In the last 24 hours I implemented Licenses validation, whitelisting, masking and database support to Entropy. OMG, 811 licenses to read! Yeah, I read them all and I’ve found something really funny. So, Who told ya that reading a license is boring?

Will open source be a victim in the Dot Bomb 2.0?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: In some ways Dot Bomb 2.0 has already begun. For the last few years the words “open source” have been what “e-commerce” was in the last decade, a secret sauce or code phrase which led greedy investors to the trough.

Linux Laptops Reach Critical Mass

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: A few years from now, open source pundits may consider February 2008 the tipping point for Linux laptops. Why is that? Glad you asked. The open source world is buzzing right now about CloudBook, an “ultraportable” Linux laptop.

An introduction to Screen

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: No matter how long you've used a computer, at some point in time you will find yourself working in the console doing any number tasks. When that day comes, you'll likely be introduced to the fun world of disconnected sessions. This is where the program "Screen" comes in handy.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 10

Filed under
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: Issue ten of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: A look at SUSE Hack Week Innovations, FOSDEM 2008 - This Weekend, and In Tips and Tricks: How to Enable 3rd-party Upgrades.

Elonex £100 laptop specs leaked

Filed under
Hardware

theinquirer.net: THERE'S BEEN much beard-scratching going on as to how Elonex can afford to build a laptop to sell for £100. And having had a sneaky gander at the full spec sheet we can reveal much of what is under the hood of the wee beastie.

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More in Tux Machines

icons and Themes: Vamox , Ashes, and DamaDamas

  • Vamox Icons Offers Three Color Variants for Linux Desktop
    Vamox icons were designed as a university thesis project by Emiliano Luciani and Darío Badagnani in 2008. The objective was to design a interface of a distro that the university could use for learning about design thin free software, From start these icons were developed for Ubuntu. Now these icons has three variants blue, orange and red, which are compatible with most of the Linux desktop environments such as: Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Mate, Xfce and so on. We have added these icons to our PPA for Ubuntu/Linux Mint and other related distributions, If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint/its derivatives then download icons and install it in one of these "~/.icons" or "/usr/share/icons/" location. If you find any missing icons or problem with this icon set then report it to creator via linked page and hopefully it will get fixed soon.
  • Ashes Is A Light Theme For Your Linux Desktop
    Ashes theme is based on Adapta and Flat-Plat theme but it includes the mixture of blue and pink color scheme with gray search entity. Usually derived themes always try to make better and enhanced version by the person who forked it, to make desktop much perfect and elegant, same thing goes for this theme, it looks and feels great on almost every desktop. Mainly it is designed to work in Unity and Gnome desktop but it can also work in other desktops such as Cinnamon, Mate, and so on. For the Gnome desktop creator have added the dark title-bar/header-bar support, so you can enable Global-Dark-Theme using Gnome-Tweak-Tool, if you prefer dark title-bars. If you are using distribution other than Ubuntu/Linux Mint/its derivatives then download theme from here and install it "~/.themes" or "/usr/share/themes/" location. If you find any kind of bug or issue within this theme then report it to creator and since this theme is in active development hopefully it will be fixed soon.
  • DamaDamas Icons Looks Great And At The Same Time Give Windows Flavor
    If you have been searching for Windows icons for your Linux desktop then you are at the right place. The DamaDamas icons are from Pisi GNU/Linux and available for every Linux distribution, these icons give Windows look and feel to your desktop. There isn't much information available for these icons but the icons are SVG format and there are almost 4000+ icons packed in very fairly sized archive. We have added these icons to our PPA and these icons are compatible with almost every desktop environment such as: Gnome, Unity, Cinnamon, Xfce, Mate, KDE Plasma and so on. If you find any missing icons or problem with this icon set then report it to creator via linked page and hopefully it will get fixed soon.

Ubuntu MATE 17.10 Alpha 2, Solus 3, OpenMandriva Lx 3.02, and More

KDE: QtWebEngine on FreeBSD, KDE PIM, Akademy 2017, Craft, Accessibility, Comics Manager for Krita, Progress on Kube

  • QtWebEngine on FreeBSD
    Tobias and Raphael pushed the button today to push QtWebEngine into FreeBSD ports. This has been a monumental effort, because the codebase is just .. ugh. Not meant for third-party consumption, let’s say. There are 76 patches needed to get it to compile at all. Lots of annoying changes to make, like explaining that pkg-config is not a Linux-only technology. Nor is NSS, or Mesa, while #include is, in fact, Linux-only. Lots of patches can be shared with the Chromium browser, but it’s a terrible time-sink nonetheless.
  •  
  • KDE PIM in Randa 2017
    Randa Meetings is an annual meeting of KDE developers in a small village in Swiss Alps. The Randa Meetings is the most productive event I ever attended (since there’s nothing much else to do but hack from morning until night and eat Mario’s chocolate :-)) and it’s very focused – this year main topic is making KDE more accessible. Several KDE PIM developers will be present as well – and while we will certainly want to hear other’s input regarding accessibility of Kontact, our main goal in Randa will be to port away from KDateTime (the KDE4 way of handling date and time in software) to QDateTime (the Qt way of handling date and time). This does not sound very interesting, but it’s a very important step for us, as afterward, we will finally be free of all legacy KDE4 code. It is no simple task, but we are confident we can finish the port during the hackfest. If everything goes smoothly, we might even have time for some more cool improvements and fixes in Kontact ;-)
  • Services Collaborating Openly at Akademy 2017
    At the recently concluded Akademy 2017 in the incredibly hot but lovely Almería, yours truly went and did something a little silly: Submitted both a talk (which got accepted) and hosted a BoF, both about Open Collaboration Services, and the software stack which KDE builds to support that API in the software we produce. The whole thing was amazing. A great deal of work, very tiring, but all 'round amazing. I even managed to find time to hack a little bit on Calligra Gemini, which was really nice. This blog entry collects the results from the presentation and the BoF. I realise this is quite long, but i hope that you stick with it. In the BoF rundown, i have highlighted the specific results, so hopefully you'll be able to skim-and-detail-read your specific interest areas ;)
  • Akademy 2017 - A wonderful experience
    Akademy 2017 was such a great experience, that I would love to share with you all in this post.
  • Akademy 2017 - Recap
    Last month I had opportunity to visit the Almería, Spain for Akademy 2017. Akademy 2017 is KDE’s annual world summit. Akademy makes it possible to meet the felow KDE contributors, some of whom you only know with their IRC nicknames (Yes, I am not old enough to know every contributors yet :p). Here is few things I did at the Akademy 2017.
  • My Adventures on Crafting part III – Craft Atelier
    Once upon a time, I start o use Craft, an amazing tool inside KDE that does almost all the hard work to compile KDE Applications on Windows and MacOS. Thanks to the great work of Hannah since last year Randa Meetings, Craft is becoming a great tool. Using all the power of Python, I started to be able to work on the deploy of AtCore for Windows.
  • Why YOU care about accessibility, and can help!
    Accessibility (a11y for short) seems like a niche area of concern for many people. I was thinking about this recently on a hot morning in Spain, walking to the bus station with my wheeled luggage. The sidewalks are thoughtfully cut out for wheelchairs -- and those with luggage! and the kids riding skateboards, and...... the rest of us.
  • Writing a comics manager for Krita
    Those who know me, or at the least know my history with Krita is that one of the prime things I personally want to use Krita for is making comics. So back in the day one of the things I did was make a big forum post discussing the different parts of making a comic and how different software solves it. One of the things about making a comic is that is a project. Meaning, it is big and unwieldy, with multiple files and multiple disciplines. You need to be able to write, to draw, to ink, to color. And you need to be able to do this consistently.
  • Progress on Kube
    We’ve been mostly focusing on ironing out UX problems all over the place. It turns out, when writing desktop applications using QtQuick you’ll be ending up with a lot of details to figure out for yourself.

OSS: Thankful For Free Software Developers, Mastodon Size, foss-gbg and More

  • People Should Really Be Thankful For Free Software Developers
    Users don’t usually realize the value of free software they get for free. Things like Linux, LibreOffice, Inkscape, GIMP and a lot of other free software may be essential in the daily life of each of us. However, we may not actually feel “pleasure” for those software developers who provided us with all of this. They may not feel the value of what they have. If you ask an engineer, a doctor, a professor, a teacher or a farmer to give you one of the products they do for free, probably they will just refuse. You won’t find a professor working full time in a university for free. You won’t find a civil engineer working on building houses for free. You won’t find a farmer giving you vegetables for free. However, you do find software developers giving it for you for free. Software are not developed by magic. Developing good software requires investing hundreds of hours in it. And although of all of that, we find a huge number of software developers who are ready to create free software for us. Investing just 100 hours in developing a small tool should worth $1500 (with a minimum wage of $15 per hour). So imagine how much it really costs to invest thousands of hours in such processes. Let’s make a small comparison.
  • Mastodon is big in Japan. The reason why is… uncomfortable
    It’s hard to say how fast Mastodon is growing, because it’s hard to say how big Mastodon is. The Mastodon Network Monitoring Project does its best to keep up, but servers come online and go down all the time. If you’re running a Mastodon server and don’t register or federate it (perfectly reasonable if you want a community just for people you invite) it won’t register on the project’s dashboard. So we might think of the 1.5 million registered users on ~2400 servers as the network’s minimum size. [...] Our team at the MIT Media Lab – Chelsea Barabas, Neha Narula and myself – are releasing a new report today on distributed publishing, titled “Back to the Future: the Decentralized Web” We end up speculating that the main barriers to adoption of decentralized platforms aren’t technical, but around usability. Most distributed publishing tools are simply too complex for most users to adopt. Mastodon may have overcome that problem, borrowing design ideas from a successful commercial product. But the example of lolicon may challenge our theories in two directions. One, if you’re unable to share content on the sites you’re used to using – Twitter, in this case – you may be more willing to adopt a new tool, even if its interface is initially unfamiliar. Second, an additional barrier to adoption for decentralized publishing may be that its first large userbase is a population that cannot use centralized social networks. Any stigma associated with this community may make it harder for users with other interests to adopt these new tools.
  • foss-gbg gets going again
    foss-gbg is a local group sharing ideas and knowledge around Free and Open Source Software in the Gothenburg area.
  • Chrome/Chromium Seems To Perform Better And Here Are Some Useful Extensions
    Since its launch in 2008, Google Chrome has now become the most popular web browser, leaving the competition way behind. Google Chrome is available for various operating systems such as Windows, Mac OS, and Linux. Linux is the most popular open source operating system, used by millions worldwide. Aside from being open source software, Linux is also customizable, which means users can fit it for specific purposes. Installing Chrome on Linux is not a direct process, but it is worth it. For one thing, Chrome is a very fast browser as compare to other browsers. It is also easy to access. Unlike in other operating systems, a straightforward installation of Google Chrome is not possible in Linux because it is not available via Software Manager in any Linux distribution, in order to install it you must download it from its official website. For example, if you wish to install Google Chrome in Ubuntu/Linux Mint, which are both most popular Linux distributions, you would have to open the terminal and run some specific commands one by one, or alternatively you can download deb file and double click to open it via installer.
  • Sercos announces availability of open source Sercos SoftMaster Ethernet master software
    Bosch Rexroth has made the Sercos SoftMaster available as free open source software on SourceForge.net. They also offer a free Sercos-on-a-Stick livesystem--a complete stand-alone demo Sercos driver package on a USB thumb drive. This includes the SoftMaster based on Intime Distributed RTOS from TenAsys Corporation, and a test application.
  • Streamlio Launches with $7.5M in Funding to Advance Real Time Applications
    New startup unifies open-source technologies including Apache Pulsar and Heron into an enterprise-grade platform. Building a full platform for real-time data analytics often involved cobbling together multiple open-source projects to get all the requirement components. Typically enterprise don't want to build their own platform, but tend to prefer integrated solution that have already done the heavy lifting of putting all the pieces together.
  • EU-Funded Open Source Service Helps You Sell Data And Protect Privacy
    OPERANDO consortium allows users to have more power over what data of theirs gets shared with online service providers. For instance, when you use the Login with Facebook or Google button on various websites. The control is offered through an open source service called PlusPrivacy which helps users with a one-stop solution, a dashboard where they can manage all their privacy settings from Facebook, Linkedin, Twitter, etc. For those who want simple solutions, there is a “single-click privacy” button which sets the settings for all the social networks to their most privacy-friendly values.
  • cron.weekly issue #93: Debian, Git, Jerakia, Lighthouse, hey, load, compression, OpenVPN & more
  • GNOME turns 20, a call for open source voting machines, and more news