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About Tux Machines

Monday, 16 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Saving Mandriva srlinuxx 2 14/08/2012 - 7:57pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 14/08/2012 - 9:47am
Story Best Educational Linux Distributions srlinuxx 14/08/2012 - 3:02am
Story GNOME opts for pristine GNOME OS dev environment srlinuxx 13/08/2012 - 8:34pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 469 srlinuxx 13/08/2012 - 7:38pm
Story Canonical Showcases Desktop Linux, Inside the Browser srlinuxx 13/08/2012 - 7:36pm
Story Qt's Move Gives FOSS the Jitters srlinuxx 13/08/2012 - 7:35pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 13/08/2012 - 5:58am
Story Snowlinux 3 Crystal Review: With Gnome 2 srlinuxx 13/08/2012 - 12:41am
Story Linux Mint 13 Cinnamon: Not Quite There Yet srlinuxx 13/08/2012 - 12:39am

Dell Dimension E520 With Ubuntu Linux Review

Filed under
Ubuntu

devnulled.com: I finally broke down and ordered a Dell Dimension E520 with Ubuntu Linux to replace my doddering primary workstation which is four years old at this point. Rather than writing a review right after opening the box, I thought I’d use the new rig for a few weeks and kick it around a bit before summarizing my experiences with the new machine.

OpenSUSE update (also, just what is a distribution?)

Filed under
SUSE

ZDNet: So what is a distribution, also known as a distro, for those of us who just can’t bring ourselves to utter the extra 2 syllables? It’s a particular packaging of the Linux operating system and usually includes a specific look and feel, as well as whatever software the vendor chooses to include.

Introducing the Thunar file manager

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Since its inception, the Xfce desktop environment has aimed to provide high functionality with only modest demands on system resources, with the overarching goal of leaving more facilities for the user to run applications. One of the significant changes in recent releases of Xfce 4 is the Thunar file manager, which replaces the original xffm.

Firefox 3 and Google team up for offline apps

Filed under
Software

PCPRO: Mozilla and Google are collaborating on an effort to make web applications work offline. Firefox 3 will be the first internet browser to offer offline web application support when it launches at the end of this year.

Linux helps raise funds for a million soccer balls

Filed under
SUSE

tectonic: Although Linux geeks are not often found on the sports field, this week Linux computers will help in a fund raiser to donate a million soccer balls to improve children's lives through sport.

Linux coders tackle power efficiency

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet: Maybe you'd be better off if you didn't spend so much time looking at your watch. That, loosely speaking, is the rationale behind a significant change at the heart of Linux that programmers hope will make the open-source operating system more efficient.

The Top 10 Best Themes for Thunderbird 2.0

Filed under
Moz/FF

suse rants: If I could make my Thunderbird look like the Viper that I’ve always wanted, I’d be totally set. Pulling up the theme page on mozilla.org, lots and lots of themes jumped out at me. Granted, not all of them are compatible with Thunderbird 2.0, which is what I’m using. Nevertheless, I decided to download the most popular themes that are compatible with T-Bird 2 and give ‘em a spin on my desktop here.

Installing And Working With Xoops Under Ubuntu 6.10

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

I want to show you how to install Xoops on Ubuntu. I used the Ubuntu 6.10 Server Edition, but it will probably work on other systems as well. Xoops is a modern

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 208

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Commentary: One year with Puppy Linux
  • News: Localised distributions, Gutsy Gibbon features, product-creator module for YaST, PCLinuxOS Control Center, backporting kernel patches

  • Released last week: Mandriva Corporate Desktop 4.0, MoLinux 3.0
  • Upcoming releases: Alt Linux 4.0, Ubuntu 7.10 Alpha 2
  • New distribution: Hacao Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

One File System to Rule Them All

Filed under
Linux

Raiden's Realm: If there's one thing that drives me nuts about the current operating system models is that there is no one single file system that works across all operating systems, fills all the needs of everyone out there and is stable beyond mention to boot.

Linux becomes mature and achieves excellence

Filed under
Linux

People's Daily Online: In recent years, the world's leading software and hardware providers such as IBM and Intel are rushing to do compatibility testing and quality authentication with China's local Linux products.

3D desktops—Beryl, Compiz and more

Filed under
Software

freesoftwaremagazine: Some would say 3D desktops are useless fluff; some swear by them. This article gives you an overview of today’s 3D desktop options, and how they can help you be more productive.

Linux: Rewriting the Buffer Layer

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Posting a series of three patches, Nick Piggin announced that he was working on a rewrite of the buffer layer which he calls fsblock, "the name is fsblock because it basically ties the fs layer to the block layer." As to just what the buffer layer is, Nick explained.

Vista's failures explained

Filed under
Microsoft

the Inquirer: DEAR MICROSOFT, Please stop your whining, it is getting quite annoying. We do realise you have an OS called MeII (aka Vista) and it isn't selling. Please accept my sympathies but not my dollars, you lost me and all my clients as a customer. I am going Linux now.

Distribution Checklist: Part 1 of 3

Filed under
Linux

Josh Saddler: As promised in a previous entry, here's the first half of a checklist I've been writing to help me evaluate other distributions. No doubt I think of more things when examining a distro, but here's a good start. For this first part of the series, I'll question the distribution's hardware support and its package manager.

Google and Linux Join Forces for Google OS

Filed under
Google

OSWeekly: In the past, we have explored the reality that, in many forms, the much anticipated "Google OS" has long since already arrived. But recently, there have been strong indicators that Google may be positioning for something more. And today, we will explore what this might look like if it were to actually happen.

Microsoft, Linux Distros Get Cozy: Let’s Get Scared

Filed under
Microsoft

OSWeekly: First we had Novell jumping onboard with Microsoft, and then came a cooperative deal with Xandros. Now we have Linspire following the trend and I’m left wondering: should we be worried? Many of you may point out that it is merely a handful of companies, but I see this differently. I see this as Microsoft trying to worm their way into the Linux market without making any real solid commitment to the users themselves.

The find and locate Commands Help You Uncover the Files You are Looking for

Filed under
HowTos

about.com: find is a powerful command line tool for identifying sets of files based on their names. With locate you can quickly find all files containing a given string.

openSUSE 10.2 - A Review

Filed under
SUSE

shift+backspace: Recently there has been plenty of news regarding the alpha releases of the next openSUSE release, 10.3. While I will be taking a look at the Alpha 5 or Alpha 6 release in the near future, many users have requested a review of openSUSE 10.2.

Fun with GStreamer Audio effects

Filed under
Software

gnomejournal: Stefan Kost describes GStreamer features that have been implemented and that are in the works, and he steps users through setting up an example with which to play.

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More in Tux Machines

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Project launches updated Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 with bug fixes
    An updated version of Debian, a popular Linux distribution is now available for users to download and install. According to the post on the Debian website by Debian Project, the new version is 8.7. This is the seventh update to the Debian eight distribution, and the update primarily focuses on fixing bugs and security problems. This update also includes some adjustments to fix serious problems present in the previous version.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2016
    The number of sponsored hours did not increase but a new silver sponsor is in the process of joining. We are only missing another silver sponsor (or two to four bronze sponsors) to reach our objective of funding the equivalent of a full time position.
  • APK, images and other stuff.
    Also, I was pleased to see F-droid Verification Server as a sign of F-droid progress on reproducible builds effort - I hope these changes to diffoscope will help them!
  • Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Gets a Beta Release, Ships with KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS
    After landing on the official download channels a few days ago, the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Edition operating system got today, January 16, 2017, an official announcement. The KDE Edition is the last in the new Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" stable series to be published, and it was delayed a little bit because Clement Lefebvre and his team wanted it to ship with latest KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment from the Kubuntu Backports PPA repository.
  • Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 — Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu In One ISO
    Linux AIO is a multiboot ISO carrying different flavors of a single Linux distribution and eases you from the pain of keeping different bootable USBs. The latest Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 is now available for download in both 64-bit and 32-bit versions. It features various Ubuntu flavors including Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu.

Top Ubuntu Editing Apps: Image, Audio, Video

It's been my experience that most people aren't aware of the scope of creative software available for Ubuntu. The reason for this is complicated, but I suspect it mostly comes down to the functional availability provided by each application title for the Linux desktop. In this article, I'm going to give you an introduction to some of the best creative software applications for Ubuntu (and other Linux distros). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google's open-source Draco promises to squeeze richer 3D worlds into the web, gaming, and VR
    Google has published a set of open source libraries that should improve the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which could help deliver more detailed 3D apps.
  • Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system
    Point of sale (POS) systems have come a long way from the days of simple cash registers that rang up purchases. Today, POS systems can be all-in-one solutions that include payment processing, inventory management, marketing tools, and more. Retailers can receive daily reports on their cash flow and labor costs, often from a mobile device. The POS is the lifeblood of a business, and that means you need to choose one carefully. There are a ton of options out there, but if you want to save money, adapt to changing business needs, and keep up with technological advances, you would be wise to consider an open source system. An open source POS, where the source code is exposed for your use, offers significant advantages over a proprietary system that keeps its code rigidly under wraps.
  • Can academic faculty members teach with Wikipedia?
    Since 2010, 29,000 students have completed the Wiki Ed program. They have added 25 million words to Wikipedia, or the equivalent of 85,000 printed pages of content. This is 66% of the total words in the last print edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. When Wiki Ed students are most active, they are contributing 10% of all the content being added to underdeveloped, academic content areas on Wikipedia.
  • AMD HSA IL / BRIG Front-End Still Hoping To Get Into GCC 7
    For many months now there's been work on an AMD HSA IL front-end for GCC with supporting the BRIG binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). It's getting late into GCC 7 development and onwards to its final development stage while this new front-end has yet to be merged. Developer Pekka Jääskeläinen has been trying to get in the finishing reviews and changes for getting approval to land this BRIG front-end into the GNU Compiler Collection. It's a big addition and with GCC 7 soon just focusing on wrong-code fixes, bug fixes, and documentation fixes starting on 19 January, there would be just a few days left to land this new front-end for GCC 7 to avoid having to wait until next year for it to debut in stable with GCC 8.
  • Rcpp 0.12.9: Next round
    Yesterday afternoon, the nineth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R. Windows binaries have by now been generated; and the package was updated in Debian too. This 0.12.9 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, and the 0.12.8 release in November --- making it the thirteenth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 906 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further. That is up by sixthythree packages over the two months since the last release -- or about a package a day!