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Tuesday, 27 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Store passwords securely in Firefox

Filed under
HowTos

Most of us visit a lot of websites, and we have a need to login to many of these sites. We know that it would be a bad idea to use the same password for all online accounts, so we create unique passwords for each site. However, it is impossible for us to remember all of these passwords so we tell Firefox to remember them for us.

SimplyMEPIS 6.5 Beta 6 expands NVIDIA Beryl support

Filed under
Linux

SimplyMEPIS 6.5 Beta 6 is now available for downloading and testing, the project announced today. The new release allows users to optionally select between two NVIDIA drivers, the latest v1.0.9746 or a legacy version (v1.0.9631), to maximize Beryl support for both newer and older chips, the project said.

Fabrice Facorat: Cooker : The Inside Man V

Filed under
MDV

What's happening in cooker recently? Some things include: since Xorg 7.2 ( x11-server-1.2 ), Nvidia users were having issues when trying to use 3D desktop, Olivier Blin gave the procedure to test Metisse under Cooker, Colin Guthrie pointed out the fact that with the new build system 64 bits Cooker was nearly in sync with 32 bits Cooker, and Warly will be missed.

Record a Desktop Video on SLED

Filed under
HowTos

After posting a couple videos from my SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10 system, some network admins have asked me to share how I record these. One said that he sees practical use in creating how-to videos for his end users. So here is how I set up my SLED10 system for capturing my desktop as a video file.

man is your friend

Filed under
HowTos

The command line is great. When you know how to use it properly, it can be the fastest way to achieve a task and it is endlessly extensible. The problem is, commands and their syntax can be really tricky to remember. Thankfully, help is at hand, thanks to man.

Gnome Menu Mockup: Kill the application browser

Filed under
Software

Recently Miguel de Icaza blogged about version 2 of gnome-main-menu, available from Gnome’s SVN, so I decided to give it a try. A thing I hate is to have an external window when “More Applications…” is clicked, why not to put the application links directly in the menu?

Snort no fort, could be mugged by bug

Filed under
Security

A flaw in Snort, the popular open-source intrusion detection system, could be used by attackers to run malicious code on vulnerable machines, several security organizations reported yesterday.

Linux power lunch: Debian founder visits Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

Ian Murdock, the chief technology officer of the recently formed Linux Foundation (created from the merger of ODL and the Free Standards Group) is set to address a group of Microsoft employees on February 20. The subject of Murdock's "Invited Speaker Series" talk: The Debian Linux distribution.

The commie smear against open source

Filed under
OSS

There are days on this beat when I fear I'm covering politics, not business. It happens when the proprietary companies trot out their FUD that open source is somehow socialist, communist, as pink as its programmers' underwear.

Also: Does open source have a political agenda?

9 Tips to diagnose remote GNU/Linux server network connectivity issues

Filed under
HowTos

Many new admin or Linux users get frustrated when their remote Linux box is not accessible dues to network connectivity. In this article I will try to provide tools and information about how to diagnose network configurations. You can try these tips/tools to diagnose an issue of Linux network connectivity to remote or local servers.

Shortcut Keys You Might Not Know About

Filed under
HowTos

Today’s tutorial might be a bit quick, but that fits along with the tips included. Speed up your work by using keyboard shortcut keys. Below I’ve listed some of the shortcut keys I use within during my day-to-day.

konqueror not vanishing. news at 11

Filed under
KDE

really didn't want to blog again today, but then i read that "we may see konqueror vanish" due to dolphin being in kdebase. some other sites picked this up, of course, because it's sensational. like many sensational headlines, it's also wrong.

Stable Linux Kernel 2.6.20.1 Released

Filed under
Linux

Greg KH and the -stable team have released the latest 2.6.20 series stable kernel. This bug-fix contains a single patch to fix a free wrong pointer bug in nfs/acl server support.

Jump into JUnit 4

Filed under
News

This tutorial guides you step-by-step through the fundamental concepts of JUnit 4, with emphasis on the new Java 5 annotations.

Xfce 4.4: The best lightweight desktop environment

Filed under
Software

For years, the lightweight Xfce has been a popular desktop environment for Linux distributions running on older hardware, thanks to its lower demand on resources as compared to KDE and GNOME; it's an ideal desktop for machines with less than 256MB of memory. Until recently, however, using Xfce was a little laborious, but with its latest release last month, Xfce is a much more usable desktop environment.

Ubuntu spurns Microsoft's advances

Filed under
Ubuntu

Products evolve and mature. Sometimes they even get better. So when I installed Vista, I thought it would only be fair if I also downloaded the latest version of Ubuntu, burned it onto CD and installed it on another machine.

How Novell Saved Millions With Open Source

Filed under
SUSE

How much money can a large enterprise save by migrating to open source from proprietary? In Novell's case, it's millions of dollars.

Ten Leading Open Source Innovators

Filed under
OSS

In the past, any open-source discussion centered on Linux, but now that Linux is a mature, stable operating system, the real innovation is happening elsewhere. As Illuminata analyst Gordon Haff notes, what’s most interesting is what happens when the open-source push collides with other technology trends. With those points in mind, here are ten leading commercial open-source innovators and the projects they’re working on.

A Windows Fanboy's Foray Into Linux: Fedora Core 6

Filed under
Reviews

Because of all my horrific previous experiences with distros from RedHat, I was really dreading the whole experience (and the response my review would provoke). But, to my chagrin, RedHat has cleaned up their act considerably.

A look at Slackware's package utilities

Filed under
Linux

Slackware Linux is the oldest surviving Linux distribution. Late last year the project marked 13 years of non-stop development with the release of Slackware 11.0. The distribution is best known for its no-frills, minimum customizations approach to applications like KDE. It's also notorious for its reluctance to switch to new version of several popular applications like Apache or GCC. No surprise then, that its package management system has seen little change over the years and is still available in just one flavor -- vanilla.

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More in Tux Machines

Security News

  • Canonical Patches OpenSSL Regression in Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, 14.04 LTS & 12.04 LTS
    After announcing a few days ago that a new, important OpenSSL update is available for all supported Ubuntu Linux operating systems, Canonical's Marc Deslauriers now informs the community about another patch to address a regression. The new security advisory (USN-3087-2) talks about a regression that was accidentally introduced along with the previous OpenSSL update (as detailed on USN-3087-1), which addressed no less than eleven (11) security vulnerabilities discovered upstream by the OpenSSL team.
  • Patch AGAIN: OpenSSL security fixes now need their own security fixes
  • Bangladesh Bank exposed to hackers by cheap switches, no firewall: Police
  • This is the Israeli company that can hack any iPhone and Android smartphone
    If Cellebrite sounds familiar, that’s because the name of this Israeli company came up during Apple’s standoff with the FBI over breaking iPhone encryption. The agency managed to crack the San Bernardino iPhone with the help of an undisclosed company. Many people believe it was Cellebrite that came to the rescue. Meanwhile, the company revealed that it could hack just about any modern smartphone, but refused to say whether its expertise is used by the police forces of repressive regimes.
  • Reproducible Builds: week 74 in Stretch cycle
  • East-West Encryption: The Next Security Frontier?
    Microsegmentation, a method to create secure, virtual connections in software-defined data centers (SDDCs), has already emerged as one of the primary reasons to embrace network virtualization (NV). But some vendors believe that East-West encryption of traffic inside the data center could be the next stop in data-center security. For example, VMware says it is looking at encrypting East-West traffic inside the data center, adding another layer of security to the SDDC. Why is that important? Today, most firewalls operate on the perimeter of the data center – either guarding or encrypting data leaving the data center for the WAN. And some security products may encrypt data at rest inside the data center. But encrypting the traffic in motion between servers inside the data center – known in the business as the East-West traffic – is not something that’s typically done.
  • DHS Offers Its Unsolicited 'Help' In Securing The Internet Of Things [Ed: In the UK, GCHQ meddles in the Surveillance of Things in the name of 'security' while at the same time, with Tories' consent, cracking PCs]
    It's generally agreed that the state of security for the Internet of Things runs from "abysmal" to "compromised during unboxing." The government -- despite no one asking it to -- is offering to help out… somehow. DHS Assistant Secretary for Cyber Policy Robert Silvers spoke at the Internet of Things forum, offering up a pile of words that indicates Silvers is pretty cool with the "cyber" part of his title... but not all that strong on the "policy" part.

today's howtos

Uruk GNU/Linux 1.0

Uruk GNU/Linux appears to be a fairly young project with some lofty goals, but some rough edges and unusual characteristics. I applaud the developers' attempts to provide a pure free software distribution, particularly their use of Gnash to provide a pretty good stand-in for Adobe's Flash player. Gnash is not perfect, but it should work well enough for most people. On the other hand, Uruk does not appear to offer much above and beyond what Trisquel provides. Uruk uses Trisquel's repositories and maintains the same free software only stance, but does not appear to provide a lot that Trisquel on its own does not already offer. Uruk does feature some add-ons from Linux Mint, like the update manager. However, this tends to work against the distribution as the update manager hides most security updates by default while Mint usually shows all updates, minus just the ones known to cause problems with stability. As I mentioned above, the package compatibility tools talked about on the Uruk website do not really deliver and are hampered by the missing alien package in the default installation. The build-from-source u-src tool may be handy in some limited cases, but it only works in very simple scenarios with specific archive types and build processes. Hopefully these package compatibility tools will be expanded for future releases. Right now I'm not sure Uruk provides much above what Trisquel 7.0 provided two years ago. The project is still young and may grow in time. This is a 1.0 release and I would hold off trying the distribution until it has time to build toward its goals. Read more

OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta2 OpenSUSE Leap 42.2 Beta2

Leap 42.2 Beta2 is looking pretty good, except for the problems with Plasma 5 and the nouveau driver. That’s really an upstream issue (a “kde.org” issue). I hope that is fixed in time for the final release. Otherwise, I may have to give up on KDE for that box. Read more