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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint Needs a Huge, Modern Overhaul, More Artists and Web Developers Are Needed Roy Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 9:40am
Story 5 Best Android Apps for Taking Fabulous Selfies Rianne Schestowitz 1 31/03/2015 - 9:35am
Story Creating a Unified Ubuntu Experience Roy Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 9:32am
Story Brave GNU world Roy Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 9:28am
Story $13 HAT aims Raspberry Pi at real-world I/O projects Roy Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 9:08am
Story Will voting systems adopt open source? Roy Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 8:57am
Story Manjaro Linux Unity 0.8.12 Is Now Available for Download - Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 5:30am
Story Systemd Developers Fork Kernel, Docker Package Management Rianne Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 5:26am
Story Mozilla Firefox 37.0 Is Now Available for Download Rianne Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 1:55am
Story Samsung Galaxy S6 review Rianne Schestowitz 31/03/2015 - 1:48am

Miro 2.0... the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

Filed under
Software

writemsg.blogspot: First lets start with the good news. The gui is much more responsive. Interacting with the sidebar is a smoother experience. Not only has the underlying code obviously been reworked but the look and feel has been overhauled too. It fits in with my GNOME desktop better than before.

Is Microsoft out to kill, rather than conquer netbooks?

Filed under
Microsoft

raiden.net: Microsoft has apparently changed it's mind about it's lineup of versions for Windows 7. So now, instead of a "netbook" version, they will apparently be offering their "starter" edition instead on notebooks. While they haven't said that verbally, their actions have spoken volumes about what they think of netbooks.

today's odds & ends

Filed under
News
  • Is Open Source A Recession-Fighting Tool?

  • Fix a borked terminal
  • Why free trade results in less freedom
  • Better reasons to use Linux on the desktop?
  • How piracy benefits Microsoft
  • Open letter to Obama: Uncle Sam should go open source
  • Open-Source ATI Driver Nears New Release
  • Comux 000111 - Free can't be good
  • Opera Adds Carakan to Browser JavaScript Engine Wars
  • Cheaper OLPC promised
  • back to GNOME
  • Firefox vs. IE Smackdown, Mozilla Jumps at Microsoft's Jugular
  • The Good News, Linux Fans, is Venture Capital Is Harder to Find
  • Data recovery from a USB key
  • Nouveau Driver 2009 Status Update
  • Linux, Windows Seek Strength in Competition
  • MAPI 0.8, OpenChange, Evolution, and OpenSUSE 11.1
  • Interview: Wired’s Chris Anderson on the ‘free’ business model
  • Mozilla Developer News Feb 10
  • Linux Void: Episode 20 - Reacting
  • Open source security debated
  • Why KDE 4.2 should use Qt 4.5
  • Get Kannada Language displayed properly in Gentoo and Sabayon
  • Building the ultimate open set-top box
  • How to write a Linux virus in 5 easy steps
  • Making The Bash History More Useful
  • Red Hat CEO Kills Open Source Financial Myth
  • Russian Federation Commits to Red Hat Open Source

Minty fresh Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: In case you haven't guessed by now, I like desktop Linux. I admit though that Linux is stuck between a rock and a hard place when it comes to dealing with proprietary media formats. There are answers though to this problem and that's one of the reasons why I like the Linux Mint distribution.

German schools pilot remote virtual Debian/KDE desktops

Filed under
Linux
Software

linuxdevices.com: An educational software organization in Germany is pilot testing an educational software system based on virtualized Debian/KDE desktops, letting students and teachers access their desktops from home or school.

Giving console applications a bad name

Filed under
Software

kmandla.wordpress: Everybody knows what a console application is like: Sparse. Unfriendly. Terse. Mute. Spartan. It’s part of the code of console applications. It has to be this way. It is the law of the jungle. That’s why we, as computer users, can no longer allow a program like calcurse to exist.

5 Must-have Linux office applications

Filed under
Software

ghacks.net: If you work in a business environment then you know the value of the office application. And if you have ever thought about using Linux in your office you know there are boundaries to adoption. The good thing is those boundaries are growing smaller and smaller with every year.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • 7 ways to optimize Firefox 3 for your netbook

  • Compile mplayer with VDPAU support on Ubuntu
  • Changing Ubuntu’s Default Configuration
  • Small tip - How to prevent Linux to "remember" your sudo password
  • Get broadband on the move with Linux
  • CPU frequency scaling in Linux with cpufreq
  • Ubuntu 8.10: Support dropped for ATI Mobility Radeon 9700 / rv300 chips
  • Blocking IP address of any country with iptables
  • Installing OpenOffice 3 in *buntu
  • Compiling a Linux kernel
  • How to patch and recompile a source rpm
  • Force Firefox To Remember Initial Window Setting In KDE
  • Read & Remove EXIF Data From the Command Line

Using Screen to Manage Multiple Remote and Interrupted SSH Sessions

Filed under
Software
HowTos

linuxplanet.com: In a day of laptops and remote systems, it's often impractical to keep the same ssh session going to a specific server indefinitely. Screen is great for letting you start a terminal session, walk away from it, and then come back later.

"Mini" smartphone design runs Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: Access China and NEC Electronics are developing a "price sensitive" smartphone reference design incorporating the "new" Mini version of the Access Linux Platform (ALP) mobile stack.

Linux Versus the Microsoft Trained Brain Syndrome

Filed under
Linux

blog.eracc.com: Recent articles I have read by people complaining about how things on Linux do not work like they do on Microsoft led me to coin the phrase Microsoft Trained Brain Syndrome (MTBS).

How S.M.A.R.T. are your disks?

GSmartControl is a graphical user interface for smartctl (from Smartmontools package), which is a tool for querying and controlling S.M.A.R.T. (Self-Monitoring, Analysis, and Reporting Technology) data on modern hard disk drives. It allows you to inspect the drive's S.M.A.R.T. data to determine its health, as well as run various tests on it.

FOSDEM 2009 - Surviving the crisis with open source

Filed under
OSS

heise-online.co.uk: The volunteer organisers of the "Free and Open Source Developers' European Meeting" (FOSDEM 2009) demonstrated the fine art of scalability with a very well organised event. 250 talks for 5000 developers arriving from all over Europe, were held with very few problems.

Handbrake DVD Ripper On Linux

Filed under
Software

danlynch.org/blog: I decided earlier this week I needed to rip a DVD and looked around at the available options on Linux. I’d heard a while back that the popular program Handrake had now released a Linux version with a GUI (Graphical User Interface) and it seemed a good idea to try it out.

Monitor Your Linux System Stats & Information With Conky

Filed under
Software
HowTos

makeuseof.com: Linux has a wealth of utilities to help you monitor what your system is up to. You can run commands, use the proc file system and get the exact state of your system. All this information is of little use if you cannot display it efficiently. You would need a system monitor right?

Linux can rule cloud computing

Filed under
Linux

See how Linux and Open Source is being positioned to rule Cloud Computing

Awesome Game - Warzone 2100 Resurrection - for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

xenstreet.com: I must admit that I have not played any kind of computer games that seriously for a while. But Warzone 2100 has completely changed that for me. This game is something special. It seems I cant get enough of it.

Funtoo Linux installed!

Filed under
Gentoo

saigonnezumi.com: Finally, I got Funtoo Linux, a derivative of Gentoo Linux, installed on my desktop. Funtoo is a distribution created by the founder of Gentoo, Daniel Robbins.

Open source video player, aggregator Miro goes 2.0

Filed under
Software

downloadsquad.com: The team behind open source internet video player Miro have pushed out version 2.0. The new player features a new interface, improved speed, and performance.

PyCon 2009 Takes Python to New Places

Filed under
News

*CHICAGO - February 10, 2009* - PyCon 2009, the seventh annual conference of the worldwide Python programming community, has opened registration and announced its list of accepted talks. The topics show Python appearing in a variety of places outside its traditional realms.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.