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Thursday, 08 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Book Review: Beginning Ubuntu Linux (2nd edition)

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Reviews

arsgeek: Thomas should have called this book Everything You’ll Ever Want To Know About Using Ubuntu. Not only is this a great guide to getting started with Ubuntu specifically and Linux in general but it contains just about anything anyone would ever need to become completely functional and productive with their new OS.

Open Source: Ready for Its Closeup

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Movies

LinuxInsider: For many filmmakers, the economics alone make open source filmmaking an attractive option. When free or low-cost production tools like CinePaint and Blender are combined with free hosting services like Internet Archive, writers and filmmakers are free to focus on film production rather than financing.

Ubuntu Kane and Abel community struggle

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Ubuntu

seopher: Because Linux has such a wealth of options; a lot of users have their system of choice and will defend it to the end. There seems to be a sense of anger/jealousy towards popular releases such as Ubuntu.

tux500 crew caught rigging Digg - with screenshots!

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Linux

Penguin Pete: May 9, 2007 helios posts to LXer, hatching plan to "Digg storm" Digg.com with the Indy Star article about tux500. (do I even have to ask how it got there?)

Want a free ticket for LinuxTag?

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Linux

amarok.kde.org: Then you're in luck: The Amarok project is giving away 20 tickets for LinuxTag 2007! All you have to do is head over to our site and participate in our little contest.

Novell confirms that patent deal gave it access to Microsoft IP

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SUSE

cbronline: Last week I noted that a new explanation had emerged as to why Novell entered into its patent agreement with Microsoft: because Novell engineers “required sanctioned access to Microsoft’s code in order to develop open source interoperability without violating MSFT's IP.”

Send Firefox to the system tray, in Linux

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Moz/FF

mozilla links: Firefox users who like a clean desktop may already know about MinimizeToTray, a extension developed by Mook and Brad Peterson for Firefox, Thunderbird or SeaMonkey on Windows platforms. FireTray, developed by Duo, does the same for Firefox users on Linux.

Eight things I DON'T like about Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

Jacek Furmankiewicz: So, Ubuntu 7.04 is out and everyone is raving how good it is. Got to agree, it's the best Linux desktop distro ever and has some great solutions to your regular pesky Linux issues. Nevertheless, it is not perfect and here are some of my pet peeves.

Linuxfest Northwest 2007 Report

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Linux

montana linux: Linuxfest Northwest has been an annual event since 1999 held at Bellingham Technical College in Bellingham Washington which is approximately 90 miles North of Seattle. To allow for the largest participation, it is held on a weekend. Linuxfest Northwest 2007 was held on April 28-29th and was attended by approximately 900 people.

Mandriva 2007 Spring Edition (2007.1)

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MDV
Reviews

lunapark6: More than any other Linux release that I have encountered, the quality of Mandriva 2007 Spring Edition depends largely on which version you download.

Extending OpenOffice.org: Checking grammar with LanguageTool

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OOo
HowTos

Linux.com: One of the features that many users dearly miss in OpenOffice.org is a grammar checker. Fortunately, LanguageTool fills the void, adding grammar-checking capabilities to OpenOffice.org.

Free “Intro to Linux” Course Now Available

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Linux

suserants: This online course is done via email. It is completely free. People register for the class, and receive an ebook via email every few days containing the next class of the course. Its goal is to be the most basic introduction to Linux possible.

Bugzilla 3.0 let loose upon the world

tectonic: Nine years after version 2.0 of the popular open source bug-tracking system was launched, Bugzilla 3.0 has been released with the same statement as its predecessor, "We like the new version much better, and hope you will too."

How to Increase ext3 and ReiserFS filesystems Performance

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HowTos

ubuntu geek: The ext3 or third extended filesystem is a journalled file system that is commonly used by the Linux operating system. ReiserFS is a general-purpose, journaled computer file system.

Open source think tank findings published

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OSS

tectonic: The Second Open Source Think Tank was held in March in California. A report on the events findings has now been released.

about Spring, Mandriva and the Community

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MDV

David Barth: We are now taking a short break before the next run: Mandriva Linux 2008. But during this break, we are making several changes in preparation for the next release. First, I'm reorganizing the teams in the Engineering, promoting Anne Nicolas as Engineering Director.

Novell and Microsoft detail 12 new Linux coupon customers

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SUSE

CBRonline: Novell and Microsoft have announced another dozen customers signing up to their interoperability agreement through which Microsoft is distributing vouchers for SUSE Linux Enterprise support.

Unreal Tournament3 web site comes to life

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Gaming

the Inquirer: AFTER A SMALL name change the ground has finally been set for arrival of mega-hit title for this year, Unreal Tournament III. This game is being finalised as we speak, and haiving ditched UT2k7 to become UT III, it looks even more impressive now.

Future Version of Ubuntu Will Do Your Work For You

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Humor

bbspot: The Linux distribution, Ubuntu, has grown quickly because of its ease of use. It makes the normally confusing Linux something even a Windows user can use. However, the Ubuntu developers are aiming even higher for the future. The next release, "Gutsy Gibbon," will be even easier to use, but the "Harry Hamlin" release will actually do your work for you.

Fault-tolerant Web hosting on a shoestring

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HowTos

Linux.com: The words "fault-tolerant Web hosting" bring to mind hosting centers with multiple redundant power supplies, complex networking, and big bills. However, by taking advantage of the underlying fault-tolerance of the Internet, you can get a surprising level of reliability for little cost.

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More in Tux Machines

Remembering Linux Installfests

Ah, yes. I remember the good old days when you had to be a real man or woman to install Linux, and the first time you tried you ended up saying something like “Help!” or maybe “Mommmmyyyyy!” Really, kids, that’s how it was. Stacks of floppies that took about 7,000 hours to download over your 16 baud connection. Times sure have changed, haven’t they? I remember Caldera advertising that their distribution autodetected 1,500 different monitors. I wrote an article titled “Monitor Number 1501,” because it didn’t detect my monitor. And sound. Getting sound going in Linux took mighty feats of systemic administsationish strength. Mere mortals could not do it. And that’s why we had installfests: so mighty Linux he-men and she-women could come down from the top of Slackware Mountain or the Red Hat Volcano and share their godlike wisdom with us. We gladly packed up our computers and took them to the installfest location (often at a college, since many Linux-skilled people were collegians) and walked away with Linuxized computers. Praise be! Read more

What New Is Going To Be In Ubuntu 17.04 'Zesty Zapus'

Right on the heels of Ubuntu 16.10 'Yakkety Yak' is Ubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zapus. Ubuntu 17.04 is currently scheduled for release on April 13, 2017 but know that this is only an estimate. One thing to know is that all things being equal, it is going to be released in April 2017. Ubuntu Zesty Zapus will be supported for only 9 months until January 2018 as it is not a LTS (long term support) release. Read
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Security News

  • News in brief: DirtyCOW patched for Android; naked lack of security; South Korea hacked
  • Millions exposed to malvertising that hid attack code in banner pixels
    Researchers from antivirus provider Eset said "Stegano," as they've dubbed the campaign, dates back to 2014. Beginning in early October, its unusually stealthy operators scored a major coup by getting the ads displayed on a variety of unnamed reputable news sites, each with millions of daily visitors. Borrowing from the word steganography—the practice of concealing secret messages inside a larger document that dates back to at least 440 BC—Stegano hides parts of its malicious code in parameters controlling the transparency of pixels used to display banner ads. While the attack code alters the tone or color of the images, the changes are almost invisible to the untrained eye.
  • Backdoor accounts found in 80 Sony IP security camera models
    Many network security cameras made by Sony could be taken over by hackers and infected with botnet malware if their firmware is not updated to the latest version. Researchers from SEC Consult have found two backdoor accounts that exist in 80 models of professional Sony security cameras, mainly used by companies and government agencies given their high price. One set of hard-coded credentials is in the Web interface and allows a remote attacker to send requests that would enable the Telnet service on the camera, the SEC Consult researchers said in an advisory Tuesday.
  • I'm giving up on PGP
    After years of wrestling GnuPG with varying levels of enthusiasm, I came to the conclusion that it's just not worth it, and I'm giving up. At least on the concept of long term PGP keys. This is not about the gpg tool itself, or about tools at all. Many already wrote about that. It's about the long term PGP key model—be it secured by Web of Trust, fingerprints or Trust on First Use—and how it failed me.

OpenSUSE Ends Support For Binary AMD Graphics Driver

Bruno Friedmann has announced the end to AMD proprietary driver fglrx support in openSUSE while also announcing they don't plan to support the hybrid proprietary AMDGPU-PRO stack either. Friedmann wrote, "Say goodbye fglrx!, repeat after me, goodbye fglrx... [In regards to the newer AMDGPU-PRO stack] I will certainly not help proprietary crap, if I don’t have a solid base to work with, and a bit of help from their side. I wish good luck to those who want to try those drivers, I’ve got a look inside, and got a blame face." Read more