Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 19 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

How real are the 451 findings?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Dan Farber is featuring news of another 451 Group study showing that open source is “just about” to take over the system management business. It’s deja vu all over again.

Tracking TCP Connections With tcptrack

Filed under
HowTos

Basically, tcptrack is a sniffer which will show the information about TCP connections on a specific interface. tcptrack will watch all the connections that occur and show the information in a nice interface.

Acer installing Linux on some notebooks, but not Ubuntu

Filed under
Linux

infoworld.nl: Acer Inc. did not install the Ubuntu Linux distribution on a batch of Aspire notebooks for sale in Singapore, but the company is installing a different version of the open-source operating system on some notebooks, local dealers said.

Instant backups with smbmount and grsync

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Need a simple yet effective way to back up your laptop or desktop machine to a network-attached storage device or a network hard disk running Samba? Using Samba's smbmount utility and the grsync backup tool, you can set up a backup system that is both reliable and straightforward in use.

Benji’s “One-Click-Install” Gets Supported by openSUSE Build Service

Filed under
SUSE

news.opensuse.org: The openSUSE Build Service generates .ymp files from now on, which can be used with Benjamin Weber’s One Click Install YaST Module.

Linux Vs. Mac: Which Is The Better Alternative To Microsoft Windows?

Filed under
OS

InformationWeek: If you're a Vista-wary Windows user who would rather switch than fight, should you move to a Linux distro or Apple's OS X? We asked a Mac fan and a Linux advocate to lead a guided tour of each OS.

Troubleshooting Linux Audio, Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

LinuxJournal: In my last installment of this series I introduced a variety of GUI-based tools that can help you discover more about your system to help identify potentially troublesome components. This week we'll look at some of the command-line utilities that do similar work. In fact, some of these utilities are the engines underneath the more attractive GUI tools, and there may be good reasons to employ the engines directly instead of relying upon their graphic incarnations.

Open to Misinterpretation

Filed under
OSS

TuxDeluxe: Before "open source", before free software, there was software in the public domain. You could say that software in the public domain was truly free. The code was "open source" and the user had the right to take it, break it, appropriate it, re-use it, package it, sell it, re-brand and license it, or do what you will with it.

Ubuntu for Dummies ?

Filed under
Ubuntu

Techzone: I came across an article Tech writers think Ubuntu is for morons. As this is at Jem Report, I cannot even ignore it. It listed some serious doubts about the capabilities of a Ubuntu user. Here is an attempt to explain/reword the points in the above article.

The pendulum has swung in the open source debate

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Once upon a time, the term "open source" was coined to save the free-software world from itself. Or, rather, from the free-software zealots. Today, I can't help but feel that the pendulum has swung in the opposite direction, where we're so self-satisfied with the money we're making off open source that we have neglected the essential freedoms that make open-source profit possible.

Desktop Backgrounds For Minimalist Window Managers Revisited

Filed under
HowTos

Caitlyn Martin: Back in February I wrote about using xli to add a desktop background of your choice to a minimalist window manager. It turns out that many distros include something a bit newer and perhaps better than xli. Esetroot can also be used to change the contents of the root window in X.

apt-listbugs: Lists critical bugs before each apt installation

Filed under
Software

DPotD: apt-listbugs is a tool designed to warn the user about critical bugs of packages that are about to be installed or upgraded. Once installed, each time you use aptitude or apt-get it will be run, and if it detects any critical bugs will stop to ask the user what to do.

New LyX document processor released, now with unicode!

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: The LyX graphical document processor is an open source program that users to focus on content rather than formatting (akin to how HTML is written when your formatting is taken care of in the CSS files).

OpenOffice.org Calc: Pivot tables by another name

Filed under
OOo

LinuxJournal: DataPilots are OpenOffice.org Calc's equivalent of what MS Excel and other spreadsheets call pivot tables. Under any name, they are a tool for extracting and summarizing the information contained in spreadsheet cells in a more convenient form. Using a DataPilot, you can immediately see relationships between different pieces of data.

Some KDE news: Decibel 0.5, Plasma Applet Browser and Kicker and Plasma

Filed under
KDE

/home/liquidat: Decibel was released as version 0.5. At the same time a Plasma Applet Browser was introduced by Ivan Čukić. Also, it was once again made clear that we will see a kicker replacement for KDE 4.0 in time.

KDE4 is very attractive for software service companies

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: The next version of KDE4 will run natively on Mac OS X and Windows XP and Vista. This means that it is a very attractive platform for software development. No other cross-platform toolkit looks as good as Qt and has an equally appealing API.

Ubuntu Documentation Mentoring

Filed under
Ubuntu

Matthew East: The mentoring project for Ubuntu documentation is going really well - the mailing list has sprung back to life after several slow months and a number of new aspiring contributors with ideas and enthusiasm have come on the scene.

One Month On, GPLv3 Adoption Going Very Smoothly

Filed under
OSS

FSM: I recently read the discussion on the GCC development mailing list related to GCC's transition to GPLv3. Despite generating 172 emails, the transition was quite smooth actually.

Linux: Distributed Storage Subsystem

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Evgeniy Polyakov, listed as the ufs filesystem and w1 subsystem maintainer, announced the first release of his distributed storage subsystem, "which allows [you] to form storage on top of remote and local nodes, which in turn can be exported to another storage as a node to form tree-like storages."

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos

Leftovers: Gaming

  • Unvanquished Open-Source Shooter Game Prepares For An Exciting 2017
    The Unvanquished open-source first person shooter game had been very promising and issuing monthly alpha releases all the way up to 48 alpha versions while they ended that one year ago without any new releases. The project is still ongoing and they are preparing for a great 2017. The Unvanquished team posted a teaser to their project site this weekend. They have been working on some "much bigger" changes. They aren't saying what the next release will be, but most will know what generally follows alpha builds... I'm a big supporter of Unvanquished, and have heard from their project lead and look forward to what's next ;)
  • OSS: RPG Maker MV CoreScript
    "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is a game engine player for 2D games that runs on the browser. "RPG Maker MV CoreScript" is designed as a game engine dedicated to "RPG Maker MV", the latest work of "RPG Maker" series of 2DRPG world number one software with more than 20 years history, and more than 1000 games are running. (February 2017)
  • HITMAN released for Linux, initial port report and two gameplay videos
    HITMAN [Steam, Feral Store] is the brand new Linux port from Feral Interactive and what a game it is! This is some serious fun to keep you occupied for many hours!
  • Hitman is Coming to Your Home
  • Castle Game Engine 6.0 Released
    Castle Game Engine is yet another open-source cross-platform game engine. What separates this game engine from others is that interestingly it's written in Object Pascal. Up until seeing this Castle Game Engine 6.0 release, I hadn't thought of Object Pascal in a few years and interesting it's being used by this game engine. Castle Engine 6.0 continues to be fitted for both 2D and 3D games and this latest release incorporates about one year of development work.

Fedora: The Latest

  • Anaconda Install Banners get a Makeover!
    A redesign/ update for Anaconda install banners has been an ongoing project for me since the summer and has recently, in the passed month or so, had a fair amount of conversation on its Pagure ticket. I have done multiple series of iterations for these banners, and in the couple of weeks have established a design that represents the Fedora vibe. There are three, sort of, sub-categories for the banners: Common Banners, Server-specific Banners, and Desktop-specific Banners. At this point I have completed drafts of the Common banners (available on all editions) and the Desktop-specific banners (available in addition to Common for Desktop editions).
  • This is why I drink: a discussion of Fedora's legal state
    Tom Callaway seems to be a very nice person who has been overclocked to about 140% normal human speed. In only 20 minutes he gave an interesting and highly-amusing talk that could have filled a 45-minute slot on the legal principles that underpin Fedora, how they got that way, and how they work out in practice. In the old days, Callaway said, Red Hat made Red Hat Linux, entirely in-house. What the company didn't make was any money; sales of hats generated more profit than sales of Red Hat box sets, which apparently were sold at a loss. It was felt that this plan wouldn't work out in the long term, so Red Hat changed to making Enterprise Linux. It didn't want to stop doing a hobbyist Linux, however, so Fedora Core was launched. Red Hat also wanted the community to have input into what Fedora was, and how it looked, but the company couldn't just drop the reins and let the community take over, because it was still legally the distributor.
  • Modularity & Generational Core: The future of Fedora?
  • Fedora 25: running Geekbench.