Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Friday, 23 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Sweet Spot: A visual look at the delicious history of Android Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 6:59am
Story openSUSE 13.2 and Fedora 21 Beta Released Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 6:59am
Story Nexus 9 Review: A Powerful Tablet…for Android Die-Hards Only Roy Schestowitz 05/11/2014 - 6:55am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:44pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:36pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:35pm
Story An open source tool to share data from Europe’s libraries and museums Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:28pm
Story Linux Distributors Are All Over the Cloud Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:23pm
Story Mobile Linux Distros Keep on Morphing Roy Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 9:12pm
Story Tiny $269 3D resin printer runs Linux on Raspberry Pi Rianne Schestowitz 04/11/2014 - 8:56pm

If You Knew Cash Like GnuCash Knows Cash

Filed under
Software

linux-mag.com: One of the final frontiers for users, and open source programmers, is the dark realm of the financial application. GnuCash fills the void of a financial package for Linux users but GnuCash, contrary to what some believe, will not replace Quickbooks although it does have some very advanced features.

Display your geolocation data with Viking

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Viking is an open source application that allows you to import and edit your Global Positioning System (GPS) points of interest and tracks. It can overlay the points and tracks on your choice of Google Maps, Terraserver, OpenStreetMap, or NASA's BlueMarble map tiles so you can see what you are doing.

Dell Inspiron Mini 9 Available Now

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

gizmodo.com: Inside is an Intel Atom Diamondville processor and it has a 1024x600 LED-backlit screen with 4, 8 and 16GB SSD options and about three hours of battery life. Only the Windows XP version is available now for $399, in black or white—the $349 Ubuntu flavor, along with the rest of the six-color rainbow are a few weeks away.

Canonical’s Ubuntu Linux Tops 8 Million Users

Filed under
Ubuntu

thevarguy.com: Sure, Windows is expected to run on 1 billion devices by 2010. But a loud minority is making its voice heard by moving to Ubuntu Linux. In fact, Canonical’s marketing materials state that Ubuntu now has more than 8 million users.

Chrome being polished for Mac and Linux

Filed under
Google

pcpro.co.uk: Google has revealed that it is "actively working" on bringing its Chrome browser to Mac OS X and Linux operating systems. Writing on its Mac development blog, the company claims that Mac and Linux engineers joined the team early in the process.

ZaReason (and Other Independents) Outshine the Big Boys

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

blog.linuxtoday: Dell, ASUS, Acer, and all the other bandwagoning coattail riders are getting all the headlines for selling desktop Linux preinstalls, especially on this new netbook wave. But let's not forget that these bandwagoning coattail-riding party-crashers are very late to the party.

Amazon to Sell OLPC XO Laptops From November

Filed under
OLPC

pcworld.com: Amazon.com will start selling One Laptop Per Child's low-cost XO notebook computer as part of the Give One, Get One program OLPC developed last year, according to an official from OLPC.

Also: Sugar openSUSE live

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Fotowall - Make Wallpaper Collages from your Photos

  • "Olympics" phone runs Linux
  • Free but not easy: A guide to open-source compliance
  • Linux has come of age
  • The 411 on KDE 4.1.1 for openSUSE
  • X Server 1.5.0 Is Now Released!
  • Evergreen takes root at Kent County Public Library
  • New Suit Puts Hans Reiser’s Company in Play
  • Online desktop or desktop online?
  • openSUSE Board and Elections, part 2
  • Led Zeppelin using Drupal
  • Fresh Fluxbox 1.1.0 Has Arrived
  • Red Hat Q and A: MRG (Messaging, Real-time, and Grid)
  • One enterprise's view on open source
  • Open Source Repository: Public Launch of the European Open Source Repository
  • Interview: Brad Linder (Liliputing) Talks Linux and Ultraportable Computers
  • Sorting Perl Lists And Removing Duplicates On Linux Or Unix
  • Novell unifies identity and security management

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to change message of the day (MOTD) in Ubuntu server

  • Sharing files with wdfs and FUSE
  • Commands you might have missed: apropos
  • Using Bash to Best Effect in Ubuntu
  • A Linux users' guide to Google Chrome
  • using awk to remove orphans
  • How To Disable On-Demand CPU Scaling on Linux
  • Keep an eye on your system logs with phpLogCon
  • Marching Penguins: Monitoring Your HPC Cluster
  • Ubuntu, Rails, Apache, Passenger, Capistrano & You

Dell's Ubuntu-powered mini-laptop arrives tomorrow

Filed under
Hardware
Ubuntu

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Sources tell me, OK friends actually, that tomorrow, September 4th, is the long-awaited day that Dell will announce the release of its Inspiron 910 mini-laptop. It will come with your choice of (Boo!) Windows XP Home SP3 or (Yea!) Ubuntu 8.04.

Open-source lab for local, state governments debuts in N.Y.

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.com: If you want local and state government officials to take a serious look at open-source software, then take the open-source software to those government officials.

The Linux Party

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com/blogs: The November election brings with it the promise of changes, new beginnings, and hope for those who've endured the past 8 years with less than an enthusiastic attitude. The choice of President and Vice President means far less to most of us than the people they choose for Cabinet positions.

GNOME Debian Package Finder: Rough and ready package search for the desktop

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you do your Debian package management from the command line, you are probably aware of utilities that search the cache of available programs, such as apt-cache, apt-file, and dpkg. Possibly, too, you have cursed the limited search information available in graphical interfaces like Synaptic. Now, the GNOME Debian Package Finder (gpfind) brings much of the command-line search capacity to the desktop.

Chromium - Open Source Chrome

Filed under
Google
  • The other Chrome: Chromium

  • Chromium - Open Source Chrome
  • Chromium Linux Build Instructions?

Hardware Review: Elonex Webbook with Ubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

adventuresinopensource.blogspot: I haven't done many distro reviews lately I know, things have been busy but I do have a new review for you which I hope you'll find interesting. Today's victim *ahem* I mean subject is the Elonex Webbook from Carphone Warehouse with Ubuntu Hardy pre-installed.

simple arch review

Filed under
Linux

42gems.com: I once thought that Debian, with its rock solid stability and simple package management, was the answer to my distro-hopping madness, and that no other distro could fit my needs as well. But Arch Linux has managed to surprise me, satisfying my needs in ways Debian never could.

Trying out LXDE

Filed under
Software

newlinuxuser.com: This is my first time to try out LXDE. I am curious about it and there are certain things that I am glad are in LXDE.

Linux Gazette September 2008 (#154)

Filed under
Linux

In this issue: Hacking a Canon A720IS digital camera with CHDK on GNU/Linux, Book Review: Blown to Bits, WPA Supplicant LEAP, Software Review: uvhd - file investigation utility, and more.I

What’s new in Ubuntu 8.10?

Filed under
Ubuntu

polishlinux.org: There are only two months left for the new Ubuntu release to appear. I’ve decided to check out what is it that the Ubuntu developers have been preparing for us. Yet again, there are no huge, revolutionary changes, but some of them are really interesting. I’ve decided to write a few words about them.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Code of Conduct, Kelly Davis, Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions

  • ow We’re Making Code of Conduct Enforcement Real — and Scaling it
    This is the first line of our Community Participation Guidelines — and an nudge to keep empathy at center when designing response processes. Who are you designing for? Who is impacted? What are their needs, expectations, dependencies, potential bias and limitations?
  • Role Models in AI: Kelly Davis
    Meet Kelly Davis, the Manager/Technical Lead of the machine learning group at Mozilla. His work at Mozilla includes developing an open speech recognition system with projects like Common Voice and Deep Speech (which you can help contribute to). Beyond his passion for physics and machine learning, read on to learn about how he envisions the future of AI, and advice he offers to young people looking to enter the field.
  • Celebrate Firefox Internet Champions
    While the world celebrates athletic excellence, we’re taking a moment to share some of the amazing Internet champions that help build, support and share Firefox.

Canonical Ubuntu 2017 milestones, a year in the rulebook

So has Canonical been breaking rules with Ubuntu is 2017, or has it in been writing its own rulebook? Back in April we saw an AWS-tuned kernel of Ubuntu launched, the move to cloud is unstoppable, clearly. We also saw Ubuntu version 17.04 released, with Unity 7 as the default desktop environment. This release included optimisations for environments with low powered graphics hardware. Read more Also: Ubuntu will let upgraders ‘opt-in’ to data collection in 18.04

The npm Bug

  • ​Show-stopping bug appears in npm Node.js package manager
    Are you a developer who uses npm as the package manager for your JavaScript or Node.js code? If so, do not -- I repeat do not -- upgrade to npm 5.7.0. Nothing good can come of it. As one user reported, "This destroyed 3 production servers after a single deploy!" So, what happened here? According to the npm GitHub bug report, "By running sudo npm under a non-root user (root users do not have the same effect), filesystem permissions are being heavily modified. For example, if I run sudo npm --help or sudo npm update -g, both commands cause my filesystem to change ownership of directories such as /etc, /usr, /boot, and other directories needed for running the system. It appears that the ownership is recursively changed to the user currently running npm."
  • Botched npm Update Crashes Linux Systems, Forces Users to Reinstall
    A bug in npm (Node Package Manager), the most widely used JavaScript package manager, will change ownership of crucial Linux system folders, such as /etc, /usr, /boot. Changing ownership of these files either crashes the system, various local apps, or prevents the system from booting, according to reports from users who installed npm v5.7.0. —the buggy npm update.

Windows 10 WSL vs. Linux Performance For Early 2018

Back in December was our most recent round of Windows Subsystem for Linux benchmarking with Windows 10 while since then both Linux and Windows have received new stable updates, most notably for mitigating the Spectre and Meltdown CPU vulnerabilities. For your viewing pleasure today are some fresh benchmarks looking at the Windows 10 WSL performance against Linux using the latest updates as of this week while also running some comparison tests too against Docker on Windows and Oracle VM VirtualBox. Read more