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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Netrunner 15 – Prometheus (64bit) Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 11:15am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 11:10am
Story Sony SmartWatch 3 Review: The Best-Performing Android Smartwatch Yet Rianne Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 2:13am
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 16/02/2015 - 12:21am
Story Three Things That Annoy Me With Using GNOME 3 Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2015 - 9:54pm
Story Some Linux distributions never change Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2015 - 9:49pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 15/02/2015 - 9:46pm
Story Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Carbon Works Great As A Linux Ultrabook Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2015 - 9:39pm
Story Red Hat wants you to contain yourself and your workloads Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2015 - 9:30pm
Story CrunchBang rises from the ashes Rianne Schestowitz 15/02/2015 - 9:20pm

Novell Calls Off BrainShare 2009

Filed under
SUSE

linuxinsider.com: Novell Inc. said Wednesday it has canceled its 2009 BrainShare, the annual conference that this year drew 5,500 to the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City.

My Tribe - An enjoyable resource management game for Linux

Filed under
Gaming

linuxhelp.blogspot: My Tribe is the latest game from Grubby Games - the creators of Prof Fizzwizzle and Fizzball. Grubby Games are known for releasing Linux versions of all their games. My Tribe game also has a Linux version. The first time I started playing the My Tribe game, I was taken in by its vivid graphics.

A Linux Christmas Carol explained

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: On Christmas Eve I suggested what "Jingle Bells" may look like if it were a Linux shell script. Here it is for those who missed out, and some interpretation for those who didn't.

Ubuntu 8.10 Desktop Customization Guide

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: Because many people complained a lot about the looks of the new Ubuntu OS and other major Linux distributions, and how they wanted a more eye-candy, professional desktop, we thought that the following tutorial would be a nice Christmas Gift for all of you Linux enthusiasts out there.

OpenSUSE 11.1

Filed under
SUSE

valdyas.org: I thought it'd be a tolerably good idea to celebrate boxing day with installing OpenSUSE 11.1. After all, given that this laptop is a Thinkpad X61t with built-in tablet, installing a new version of any distribution tends to be interesting.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Is Windows 7 Really A Linux Killer?

  • atool: handling archives without headaches
  • The NetSlave Quiz - Unix And Linux Humor
  • Contributing to a Project with a Maintainer Who Doesn't Merge Contributions Quickly
  • VLC Christmas Easter Egg
  • RedHat’s new oVirt virtualization host looks promising
  • cpio - copy files to and from archives
  • How to install NetBeans 6.5 on Ubuntu Linux desktop edition

DSL vs Puppy Linux

Filed under
Linux

aronzak.wordpress: Today, in Ken Hess’s Linux Blog, the top 10 Distrowatch distros are listed as ones to try out by downloading and burning them to disc or virtualising. What annoys me is that Damn Small Linux (abbreviated DSL because it’s a bad name) got into that list, but not Puppy Linux. Why?

passing between years

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: The calendar in my Plasma panel says that soon we will have gone through all the days allocated for 2008 and will start in on 2009. While a rather arbitrary line in time, calendar year-ends are a convenient time to look both back and forward. KDE sits between two great years in its history and therefore there is much one can reflect upon as well as look forward to.

An exclusive interview with Martin Nordholts (of GIMP)

Filed under
Interviews

jcornuz.wordpress: For a long time I wanted to do an interview with one of the GIMP developers. Then I came across Martin Nordholts (aka enselic) website. I decided he was the man and bugged him for an interview.

Obligatory Year-End Positive Linux Predictions

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: Almost every year end, most blogs - magazines - publications and so called “Linux gurus” makes mostly positive predictions about the future of Linux and it’s market share. Following this tradition, it’s only fair that I too share with you my Linux predictions for 2009.

The Definitive Guide to Open Source Hardware - 2008

Filed under
Hardware

googlelunarxprize.com: Again this year MAKE Magazine blog has publishes the annual Open Source Hardware Guide listing no less than 60 open source hardware projects, ranging from simple microcontroller boards to a fully functional cell phone. Open source hardware are projects where the designers have decided to publish all the source, schematics, firmware, software, bill of materials, parts list, drawings and "board" files necessary to recreate the hardware.

The Internet is the tree, open source the fruit

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: One of the big journalistic trends of 2008 was to call every new Internet paradigm open source. This was both a compliment and a warning.

Quick Thoughts on Amarok 2.0

Filed under
Software

jintoreedwine.wordpress: I was very pleased to hear that Amarok 2.0 had finally been released and I have been awaiting it for some time now. I had heard stories of people not liking the new interface, but I didn’t have much of an opinion on it because I hadn’t used it.

Win to Mac – Why not move to Linux?

Filed under
OS

mac.blorge.com: We are documenting the move of a business user from the Windows platform on a PC to the OS X platform on a Mac. Why would such a user move to the Mac and not to Linux?

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Ubuntu 4GB Ram Limitation and Solution

  • migrate ext3 > ext4
  • How to get your iRiver E100 working nicely in Linux
  • Ubuntu Desktop Effects : Composite not available
  • Instructing APT to not consider recommends packages as strict dependecies
  • The Debian Package Management System
  • Desktop Resources
  • How To Backup Gmail In Ubuntu Intrepid
  • Menage Skype and Facebook with Pidgin
  • How to install VMware Tools - Tutorial
  • Banish your daemons for a faster Linux PC
  • Cropping Images using GIMP
  • Using .htaccess for password protecting web directory

Sid Or Sidux?

Filed under
Linux

tuxicity.wordpress: Sidux is based on the unstable branche of Debian, better known as Sid. I decided to give it a go and see if its a good idea to use Sidux in stead of Sid.

First look at Windows 7 beta 1

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: I have to thank Santa for leaving me a copy of Windows 7 beta 1 in my stocking for Christmas Day. This beta (build 6.1.7000.0.081212-1400) should be the first and only beta from Microsoft of Windows 7, and I’m pleased to report that it’s a good one.

The War for Open Source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.opennms.org: Starting about the time that Bill Gates wrote his infamous Letter to Hobbyists, the commercial software industry has sought to control and restrict access to source code.

P3 Xubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: I've been running Xubuntu 8.1 on a 700 Mhz P3 COMPAQ ENPRO computer with 512 MB of RAM. This system originally had Windows 2000 on it and it ran fairly well if a little slow. I've tried Debian 4.0 on it and wasn't really impressed. With an earlier version of Ubuntu it was a little more lively. Xubuntu and a P3 is a good combination, especially with the xfce desktop.

Fast and 'free' beats steady and paid on MySQL

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: MySQL, the lovable little database engine that could - for reasonable values of could - is starting to feel the pain of being an open source project distributed by a large company.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Graphics: XWayland and Mesa

  • XWayland Gets Patches For Better EGLStreams Handling
    While the recently released X.Org Server 1.20 has initial support for XWayland with EGLStreams so X11 applications/games on Wayland can still benefit from hardware acceleration, in its current state it doesn't integrate too well with Wayland desktop compositors wishing to support it. That's changing with a new patch series.
  • Intel Mesa Driver Finally Supports Threaded OpenGL
    Based off the Gallium3D "mesa_glthread" work for threaded OpenGL that can provide a measurable win in some scenarios, the Intel i965 Mesa driver has implemented this support now too. Following the work squared away last year led in the RadeonSI driver, the Intel i965 OpenGL driver supports threaded OpenGL when the mesa_glthread=true environment variable is set.
  • Geometry & Tessellation Shaders For Mesa's OpenGL Compatibility Context
    With the recent Mesa 18.1 release there is OpenGL 3.1 support with the ARB_compatibility context for the key Gallium3D drivers, but Marek Olšák at AMD continues working on extending that functionality under the OpenGL compatibility context mode.
  • Mesa Begins Its Transition To Gitlab
    Following the news from earlier this month that FreeDesktop.org would move its infrastructure to Gitlab, the Mesa3D project has begun the process of adopting this Git-centered software.

Welcome to Ubuntu 18.04: Make yourself at GNOME. Cup of data-slurping dispute, anyone?

Comment Ubuntu 18.04, launched last month, included a new Welcome application that runs the first time you boot into your new install. The Welcome app does several things, including offering to opt you out of Canonical's new data collection tool. The tool also provides a quick overview of the new GNOME interface, and offers to set up Livepatch (for kernel patching without a reboot). In my review I called the opt-out a ham-fisted decision, but did note that if Canonical wanted to actually gather data, opt-out was probably the best choice. Read more

How CERN Is Using Linux and Open Source

CERN really needs no introduction. Among other things, the European Organization for Nuclear Research created the World Wide Web and the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the world’s largest particle accelerator, which was used in discovery of the Higgs boson. Tim Bell, who is responsible for the organization’s IT Operating Systems and Infrastructure group, says the goal of his team is “to provide the compute facility for 13,000 physicists around the world to analyze those collisions, understand what the universe is made of and how it works.” Read more