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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why am I a freetard? srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 2:02pm
Story The Linux Desktop: Not Dead, Just Broken srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 2:00pm
Story LF Announces Automotive Grade Linux Workgroup srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 3:44am
Story 80 Open Source Replacements for Audio-Video Tools srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 3:41am
Story Mandriva and Fedora Release Alphas srlinuxx 20/09/2012 - 3:40am
Story Ubuntu 12.10 Quantal Quetzal Beta 1 Review srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 11:48pm
Story Sabayon 10 Review: Gentoo on steroids! srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 11:43pm
Story Choose your Gnome distribution srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 11:41pm
Story openSUSE 12.2 KDE - Now is the right time srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 11:39pm
Story Music players shakedown srlinuxx 19/09/2012 - 7:48pm

Is Ubuntu the way forward for Linux?

Filed under
Interviews

ITPro: During the last three years Ubuntu has sprung from nothing to become the most popular desktop distribution of Linux. There are good reasons for Ubuntu's success. Ubuntu is clean and uncomplicated which makes it attractive to entry level users, without sacrificing the traditional Debian virtues of stability, flexibility and configurability, which has made it an enticing proposition for developers.

Solution: Preventing damage after a system lockup

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Tutorials: No matter how stable the Linux kernel is, things like hardware failures can still lock up your system quite effectively. If you ever encounter a case like that, rebooting is pretty much the only option. However, there is rebooting and rebooting. This solution describes a way to reboot your system that will do things like terminating all processes, syncing the remounting the disks, in order to prevent damage as much as possible. This can save you a lot of fscking and data loss.

SUSE vs. Ubuntu - first impressions

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet: I’ve used SUSE Linux before, but that was way back in the day of version 9. Things have changed a lot since then. I’ve been happily using Kubuntu 7.04 for a while now, but wanted to begin using SUSE on a daily basis so that I can test their emerging set of educational software.

Command line tip - peek into the start and end of files

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Sometimes, especially when dealing with log files, you might want to peek at the start and/or end of a file to see just that bit of the file and not the whole thing. Of course, there are a couple of easy commands that allow you to do this.

Also: Change Ubuntu’s default paper size from A4 to Letter

Making Gnash: a well-deserved name?

Filed under
Software

freesoftware mag: Gnash is the Free Software Foundation’s alternative Apple Flash player. Version 0.8 is the third alpha release, and frankly, it rocks! It is also one of the first projects to be covered by the GPLv3.

Security Beefed Up for Linux

cxotoday.com: All infrastructure, regardless of underlying platform, need to be secured and protected through multiple layers of security. Linux systems are not an exception. The inherent security advantages of Red Hat Enterprise Linux and the Application Stack combined with Symantec's Critical System Protection, gives Small and Medium Businesses (SMBs) a standards-based foundation for a variety of application workloads.

Emacs 22 enhancements make venerable editor flashy again

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Emacs 22.1 hit the street a month ago, a long-awaited update to the GNU project's customizable and extensible do-everything super-editor that has been six years in the making. Here's a look at what you'll find in the new version.

Setting up a Layer 3 tunneling VPN with using OpenSSH

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: This article describes how to use the new tunneling features of OpenSSH V 4.3 to establish a VPN between two Debian or Debian-like systems. Note that by tunneling I am referring to layer-3 IP-in-SSH tunneling, not the TCP connection forwarding that most people refer to as tunneling.

Bring Out the GIMP Part 1: GIMP Basics

Filed under
GIMP

maximumpc.com: No matter which Linux distro you run, chances are it came with a magnificent little image editor called GIMP (GNU Image Manipulation Program). Unlike Paint and other free-with-your-OS image editors, GIMP is a full featured graphics app with a broad range of capabilities that rival those os Adobe Photoshop.

Open Source Gaming Review: Linux Gamers Live DVD 0.9.2

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

Raiden's Realm: Being an avid gamer who loves Linux, I felt that it would be a good idea to go try out the new Linux-Gamers.net live dvd. This is a live dvd built on Arch Linux and designed with one purpose in mind. Gaming.

Configure GMail in Evolution, Thunderbird or KMail

Filed under
HowTos

debianadmin: Many of us would like to use our GMail accounts in Evolution, and to a lesser degree Thunderbird and KMail. Here is a step by step guide on how to configure Evolution, Thunderbird and KMail to access you GMail account.

A Useful Hack for Storing Text or Editable Pictures You Need to Reuse, in OpenOffice Impress Presentations

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: My friend Ben Horst wrote to me with a question about how to store editable content in a presentation that you reuse periodically. Like a few buttons formatted a particular way, text boxes, anything that can't easily be drawn and formatted and has to look a certain way. My answer was, well, kind of a hack, but I think it's useful enough to point out.

Fedora 7.0 Linux distribution

Filed under
Reviews

PC Advisor: Fedora 7.0 is the latest community-based Linux release from Red Hat. Fedora and Novell's OpenSuse are Ubuntu Linux's two chief "competitors". All three Linux distros are free downloads; all have vibrant online communities where you can go for tips, troubleshooting and advice. And all three Linux distributions will hook you up with a modern, friendly environment that you can start exploring right away.

Are top Linux developers losing the will to code?

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk: Core Linux developers are finding themselves managing and checking, rather than coding, as the number of kernel contributors grows and the contributor network becomes more complex.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 209

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interview: Clement Lefebvre, Linux Mint

  • Feedback: One year with Puppy Linux
  • News: GPL 3, Google Desktop, GNU/Linux distro timeline, YaSTRS for openSUSE, PC-BSD LiveCD, Yellow Dog Linux 5.0.2
  • Released last week: Dreamlinux 2.2 "Multimedia GL", SoL 25.00
  • Upcoming releases: Fluxbuntu "Gutsy Gibbon"
  • Donations: KTorrent receives US$400
  • New distributions: Baltix GNU/Linux, Draco GNU/Linux, FrogLinux, pclosBE, TinyME, UW-Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Organize and find files fast with GTKtalog

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: If you own a large number of CD or DVD media disks, you might have a hard time finding a specific file or folder on one of them -- unless you use GTKtalog. This utility scans every file and folder on your storage media and saves the captured information in a single-file searchable database named CDkatalog.

GConf — GNOME under the hood

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: Gconf is a system built in GNOME 2 which stores applications’ preferable configuration data as well as graphical environment variables in its own files.

Mini Review of a Tiny PCLOS

Filed under
PCLOS
Reviews
-s

TinyMe is a scaled down version of PCLinuxOS 2007. The latest version is delivered as a 177 MB liveCD and features the Lightweight X11 Desktop Enviroment, Synaptic, and the PCLinuxOS Control Center. It comes with a few applications, so it could be a really light version of PCLOS for older computers or a foundation on which to build your own system as you choose.

Linspire pays the cost of Volish agreement

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

The Inquirer: LINUX DISTRIBUTOR Linspire has shown what it is costing it to sign a deal with Microsoft over patents.

Linux Less Secure Than Vista?

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: I have been hearing a lot lately about how Windows Vista is being said to be more secure overall than the popular Linux distros in the market today. After soaking this in and having a chance to think about it, I can come to only one conclusion: Microsoft must believe that vulnerabilities are worse than actual, in motion exploits being used against exiting operating systems.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Leftovers: Software

  • HandBrake 1.0.2 Open-Source Video Transcoder Released for Linux, Mac and Windows
    After more than 13 years of development, the HandBrake open-source video transcoding app reached 1.0 milestone on Christmas Eve last year, and the second bugfix release is already available. HandBrake 1.0.2 is full of improvements and bug fixes enhancing the out-of-the-box video, audio, and subtitles support, but also adds various platform specific changes for all supported operating systems, including GNU/Linux, macOS, and Microsoft Windows.
  • SMPlayer 17.1 Open-Source Video Player Introduces Chromecast Support, More
    It's been two and a half months since you last updated your SMPlayer open-source video player, and a new stable release is now available, versioned 17.1, with some exciting features. Sporting initial Chromecast support, SMPlayer 17.1 will let you send video files from your personal computer to your Chromecast device to watch them on your big-screen TV, or your friends for that matter. The feature supports both online and local sources, including those from popular video hosting services like YouTube and Vimeo.
  • Firefox 51 Released with FLAC Support, Better CPU Usage
    A new month means a new release of the venerable Mozilla Firefox web browser. Firefox 51 ships with FLAC support, WebGL 2, and a whole heap more — come see!
  • Mozilla Firefox 51.0 Now Available for Download, Supports FLAC Playback, WebGL 2
    It's not yet official, but the binary and source packages of the Firefox 51.0 web browser are now available for download on your GNU/Linux, macOS, or Microsoft Windows operating system. Mozilla will have the pleasure of unveiling the Firefox 51.0 release tomorrow, January 24, according to the official schedule, but you can already get your hands on the final version of the web browser by downloading the installers for your favorite OS right now from our website (links are at the end of the article).

OSS Leftovers

  • Berkeley launches RISELab, enabling computers to make intelligent real-time decisions
  • Amazon, Google, Huawei, and Microsoft sponsor UC Berkeley RISELab, AMPLab's successor
  • Brotli: A new compression algorithm for faster Internet
    Brotli is a new open source compression algorithm designed to enable an Internet that's faster for users. Modern web pages can often be made up of dozens of megabytes of HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, and that's before accounting for images, videos, or other large file content, which all makes for hefty downloads. Such loads are why pages are transferred in compressed formats; they significantly reduce the time required between a website visitor requesting a web page and that page appearing fully loaded on the screen and ready for use. While the Brotli algorithm was announced by Google in September 2015, only recently have the majority of web browsers have adopted it. The HTTP servers Apache and nginx now offer Brotli compression as an option. Besides Google, other commercial vendors (such as Cloudflare and DreamHost) have begun to deploy support for Brotli as well.
  • New Year’s resolution: Donate to 1 free software project every month
    Free and open source software is an absolutely critical part of our world—and the future of technology and computing. One problem that consistently plagues many free software projects, though, is the challenge of funding ongoing development (and support and documentation). With that in mind, I have finally settled on a New Year’s resolution for 2017: to donate to one free software project (or group) every month—or the whole year. After all, these projects are saving me a boatload of money because I don’t need to buy expensive, proprietary packages to accomplish the same things.
  • Toyota and Ford Promote Open Source Smartphone Interfaces
    Ford and Toyota have formed a four-automaker consortium to speed up the deployment of open source software for connected in-car systems, according to a report by Bloomberg. The SmartDeviceLink Consortium, which includes Mazda, PSA Group, Fuji, and Suzuki, aims to prevent Apple and Google from controlling how drivers connect smartphones to their vehicles. Suppliers Elektrobit, Harma, Luxoft, QNX, and Xevo have also joined the organization, which is named after an open source version of Ford’s AppLink connectivity interface, a system used in over 5 million vehicles globally.
  • What your code repository says about you
    "You only get one chance to make a first impression," the old saying goes. It's cliche, but nevertheless sound, practical advice. In the realm of open source, it can make the difference between a project that succeeds and a project that fails. That's why making a positive first impression when you release a repo to the world is essential—at least if your motivations involve gaining users, building a community of contributors, and attracting valuable feedback.
  • The Open Source Way of Reaching Across Languages
    I don’t speak Spanish, but that doesn’t mean I can’t learn some important things from this video. The visuals alone are quite instructive. At my public library job, I mentor a number of wonderful Latino youth. One of them might ask me about open source CAD software — and I’ll direct them right to this FOSS Force article. Of course, I subscribed to the YouTube channel of the creator of this video, and also clicked on its like button. If the screencast creator comes back to look at this video in February, they’ll find that they have a number of new subscribers, a number of likes for the video and the video view count might be more than 100. All those indicators will be encouragement for them to make their next open source screencast. And so it goes. That’s how we support each other in the open source world.
  • School systems desperate for standards-aligned curricula find hope
    Open Up Resources is a nonprofit collaborative formed by 13 U.S. states that creates high-quality, standards-aligned open educational resources (OERs) that are openly licensed under CC BY-SA 4.0. Unlike other providers, Open Up Resources provides curriculum-scale OER options; they believe that while many people seem to know where to find supplemental materials, most curriculum directors would not know where to look if they were planning a textbook adoption next year.
  • Visual Studio Test joins Microsoft's open source push [Ed: More openwashing of proprietary software from Microsoft, which interjects surveillance into compiled code]
  • Microsoft Open-Sources DirectX Shader Compiler [Ed: Windows lock-in.]

Red Hat's Survey in India