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Tuesday, 28 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Manage Linux Hardware with udev (Part 2)

Filed under
Linux

Last week we learned the basics of the udev filesystem, and how to dig up device names. Today we dive into writing custom udev rules. Why would you want to acquire this strange knowledge? Because, believe it or not, computers are not yet perfect, so sometimes we must fix them.

Book Review: Ubuntu Linux for Non-Geeks

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Reviews

Rickford Grant's book runs parallel to Gagné's, which I reviewed recently. They are both good books, though Grant is even more directed to the absolute newbie than Gagné.

Linux vs. Windows Vista: Is There a Contest?

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OS

We know we’ve said it before, but the answer to any question most often depends on whom you ask. Whether the bad press surrounding Windows Vista’s anti-piracy program will hurt Microsoft’s share of the OS market in favor of Linux is no exception.

UNIX tips: Become a better blogger with UNIX

Filed under
Linux

Did you know that blogging and UNIX go hand in hand? The native Web and text-processing tools of UNIX enable you to create your blogs quickly and easily. Discover command-line tools and some handy tips for improving your UNIX blogging skills.

Myah OS 2.3 Released

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Linux

Myah OS 2.3 SE is now available for download. Multimedia and Gaming has always been the focus, and 2.3 really brings that into focus. Firefox 2.0rc2 has been jam packed with support for Flash, Java and embedded video. But now embedded video is also available within Konqueror. 3D drivers for ATI and nVidia has also been optimized, both for ease of use and best performance.

LINUX XP ....boom or BUST!

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Linux

There are times when intrigue causes me to jump up, download a distribution. do an install and in some cases I am happy, while in other cases ...well! A few weeks ago, I was reading Distrowatch when I saw the announcement of a new distribution that really piqued my attention. LINUX XP.

Internet Explorer Usage Continues To Fall

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Moz/FF

Use of Internet Explorer is continuing to decline at the expense of Mozilla's Firefox, making the imminent launch of IE7 even more vital for Microsoft.

For Opera, smaller really is better

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Interviews

Wium Lie, who works out of the company's home base in Norway, recently visited San Francisco, where he caught up with CNET News.com editors to discuss the state of browser technology.

Linux for the supernewbie

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HowTos

This is the first of a four part series that will, if you decide you WANT TO, and only if you want to, introduce you to Linux, and by they end, you might just find yourself with Linux installed on your computer beside windows.

HOW-TO: Adobe Photoshop CS2 on Ubuntu - 10 steps!

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HowTos

This HOW-TO covers up the whole process of installing Adobe Photoshop CS2 on a Ubuntu box in a few simple steps. This method has been tested only on Ubuntu, but it should work on any other linux flavor.

Torvalds takes bite of Mac mini

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Mac

Linus Torvalds has picked up one of Apple's new Intel-based Mac minis to play with, but the Linux creator still prefers Apple's old PowerPC architecture for his primary desktop machine.

The Perfect Setup - CentOS 4.4 (32-bit)

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HowTos

This is a detailed description about how to set up a CentOS 4.4 based server that offers all services needed by ISPs and hosters (web server (SSL-capable), mail server (with SMTP-AUTH and TLS!), DNS server, FTP server, MySQL server, POP3/IMAP, Quota, Firewall, etc.). This tutorial is written for the 32-bit version of CentOS 4.4, but should apply to the 64-bit version with very little modifications as well.

Enterprise Unix Roundup: The Penguin Plunge

Filed under
Linux

Enterprise Unix Roundup recently spoke with Amy Niersbach, platform architect, business and information services, for the city of Chicago. She outlined how and why the decision was made to migrate two of the city's systems to Red Hat Linux.

A first look at the Linux friendly Google Docs & Spreadsheets project

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Google

All netizens would by now be aware of Google re-launching its online Spreadsheet and Writely Document products as an integrated product at docs.google.com. This is a first look at what is in store for people who intend to use this Google product.

KDE 3.5.5 Released

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KDE

The KDE Project today announced the immediate availability of KDE 3.5.5, a maintenance release for the latest generation of the most advanced and powerful free desktop for GNU/Linux and other UNIXes.

Interview: Gael Duval

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Interviews

A few weeks ago, Gael Duval lifted the veil of secrecy surrounding his new project a little bit by 'leaking' some screenshots and information. Obviously, a lot of questions remained, and hence we contacted Gael Duval in order to ask him some basic questions about Ulteo.

Quicktips - How to make your fonts so smooth you’ll cry

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HowTos

Here’s a great tip picked up from Zenwhen over at the Ubuntu Forums for making your fonts super-smooth. There’s a huge amount of difference here, so much so that even my bad 80’s Metal font looks nice. Note that this was done with Gnome in Ubuntu 6.06, but should work with KDE as well.

Full Tip.

SLAX v5.1.8 LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

SLAX, our favorite mini LiveCD at Phoronix, has reached version 5.1.8. Like usual, they have their various SLAX editions such as KillBill, Server, Popcorn, and Frodo. SLAX Standard v5.1.8 features KDE 3.5.4, recompiled with some Slackware 11.0 fixes, better handling of booting from USB devices, and added slaxsave.zip to the SLAX CD.

Complete Story

Mandriva readies for global installfest

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MDV

Mandriva, makers of the popular Linux distribution, are to hold a global Linux installfest later this month.

Automatic/Dynamic configuration of hostnames for rolling out labs

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I was given the task of rolling out a number of PCs running Linux for a student lab. The roll out isn't complete yet, but I thought that this trick was so nice for lab based environments that I'd use it to try my hand at a debian-administration article.

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More in Tux Machines

When A Computer Is Ready for the Junk Pile

HBO//Devious Maids S04E01 Online 2016. HBO//Pretty Little Liars S7 E2 Online 2016.

Windows 'Upgrade'

  • When A Computer Is Ready for the Junk Pile
    To that point, there was a report that a mail server failure in a large business office remained a mystery for two days until someone found an old Pentium II back in the corner of some obscure closet with a burned out power supply. It is reported that the Slackware/Debian/Red Hat machine had been plugging away as a mail server for a number of years, completely unattended. That’s feasible I suppose, but I further suppose that it’s a modern day parable about how open source can indeed, carry the day.
  • Microsoft draws flak for pushing Windows 10 on PC users
    With about a month left for many PC users to upgrade to Windows 10 at no charge, Microsoft is being criticized for its aggressive — some say too aggressive — campaign to get people to install the new operating system.
  • Microsoft forks out thousands over forced Windows 10 upgrade
    Microsoft has had to pay a Windows user in California US$10,000 over a forced upgrade to Windows 10, according to a report in the Seattle Times. The user, Teri Goldstein, runs a travel agency in Sausalito, a San Francisco Bay Area city in Marin County, California.
  • A lawsuit over an unwanted Windows 10 upgrade just cost Microsoft $10,000
    Microsoft recently paid a (very small) price for its Windows 10 upgrade tactics, and that was before they became increasingly aggressive.
  • Updategate: California woman awarded $10,000 for borked Windows 10 upgrade
    A CALIFORNIA woman has set a precedent after a court ruled that she was entitled to damages over the installation of Windows 10 on her machine. Teri Goldstein, a travel agent, testified that the new operating system had auto-downloaded, started to install, failed, and left her Windows 7 computer running painfully slowly and often unusable for days. "I had never heard of Windows 10," Goldstein told reporters. "Nobody ever asked me if I wanted to update."
  • Microsoft pays out $10,000 for automatic Windows 10 installation
    Company withdraws appeal leaving it liable for $10,000 compensation judgment after botched automatic upgrade of travel agent’s computer
  • Microsoft Pays Woman $10,000 Over Its Forced Windows 10 Upgrade
    As a result of a legal suit, Microsoft has paid a woman $10,000 over the forced Windows 10 upgrade.
  • 'I urge everyone to fight back' – woman wins $10k from Microsoft over Windows 10 misery
    A California woman has won $10,000 from Microsoft after a sneaky Windows 10 update wrecked the computer she used to run her business. Now she's urging everyone to follow suit and "fight back." Teri Goldstein – who manages a travel agency in Sausalito, just north of San Francisco – told The Register she landed the compensation by taking Microsoft to a small claims court. Rather than pursue a regular lawsuit, she chose the smaller court because it was better suited to sorting out consumer complaints. Crucially, it meant Microsoft couldn't send one of its top-gun lawyers – or any lawyer in fact: small claims courts are informal and attorneys are generally not allowed. Instead, Redmond-based Microsoft had to send a consumer complaints rep to argue its case.

Canonical Releases New Kernel Update for Ubuntu 12.04 LTS and Ubuntu 14.04 LTS

We reported the other day that Canonical released a major kernel update for its Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, and it appears that it also affected users of the Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) distribution. Read more

This programmable, open source outlet can do things that off-the-shelf smart plugs can't

Excited by the idea of an open-source, Arduino-based outlet, capable of remotely controlling your various household devices? If so, you’ll definitely want to check out the Portlet: a versatile portmanteau of “portable” and “outlet,” which — despite only consisting of 4 buttons and a simple 2×15 character LCD screen — can be programmed to do everything from switching your lights on at a certain time to keeping your coffee heated at the perfect temperature. Read more