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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 30 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Black Lab Linux 4.1.8 released Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:45pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:43pm
Story Google Pays States , Newegg Tackles Troll & More Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:38pm
Story GLib 2.38.2 Adds Workaround for Buggy D-Bus Daemons Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:27pm
Story TurnKey Linux 13 Has Been Released Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:21pm
Story K. Y. Srinivasan: From Serving Microsoft’s Agenda Inside Novell to Helping Microsoft Infiltrate and Control Linux Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:15pm
Story Best Practice Linux Guide: Data Security Rianne Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 8:08pm
Story The Linux Mint Security Controversy Taken Out of Proportions, Distracting From Real Controversies Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 7:27pm
Story Winamp Petition Emerges as Microsoft Considers Purchase Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 12:27pm
Story Leftovers: KDE Roy Schestowitz 23/11/2013 - 10:07am

Software Review: Windows Out, Linspire In!

Filed under
Linux

bloggernews.net: I have spent the last week in Windows hell, I have been the victim of virus writers, and indeed a victim of Microsoft themselves, I believe they call the program “Windows Genuine (DIS)advantage”. When I saw the Press Release for Linspire I was skeptical to say the least. Generally speaking Linux requires a PHD in Astro Physics just to log in. It then requires a double PHD just to browse a web site.

My Week in Ubuntu: Gutsy Upgrade!

Filed under
Ubuntu

torgodevil.com: Gutsy FINAL isn’t due out until October 18th, but they’ve released a “Release Candidate” version that’s probably going to be the final version baring any major fuckmuppetry. Since the command to upgrade was LITERALLY one line of short code, I figured “What the hell?

Lessons learned from open source Xara's failure

linux.com: On October 11, 2005, proprietary software maker Xara announced its plans to open the source code to its flagship vector graphics package Xara Xtreme, and with the help of community developers port it to Linux. Today, two years later, the project is stagnant and on the verge of irrelevance, primarily because the company couldn't figure out how to work with the open source community.

Linux MOST Frequent Problems: Their Cause and Solutions

Filed under
HowTos

jensonsblog.blogspot: These are some various linux/unix problems I've encountered over the years, but which I was not able to find a solution for online. Hopefully this will save you the trouble I had.

10 Features in 10 Days: Desktop Effects with Compiz

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Today we soldier on to Desktop Effects with Compiz Fusion. It can be safely said that few features are as keenly desired as Desktop Effects. Ever since Compiz was announced XXX years ago, users and developers have been playing with the bling-tastic effects and wondering when it will hit a desktop near them.

Linux patent lawsuit: follow the money

Filed under
Legal

matt asay: Why sue two companies with nonexistent desktop businesses when Microsoft provides the biggest potential jackpot of all? (After all, this same company sued and settled with Apple earlier this year.) Unless, of course, it is Microsoft funding the whole thing?

PCLinuxOS 2007 A worthy alternative to Ubuntu?

Filed under
PCLOS

aspir8or.com: Having read that PCLinuxOS had taken over the leaderboard from Ubuntu at Distrowatch as the most downloaded distro, I was keen to try it out. PCLinuxOS2007 is a solid and eyecatching option and it’s easy to see why it’s battling with Ubuntu for most downloaded status at Distrowatch.

Free your mind with Freemind

Filed under
Software

itbusiness.ca: Freemind is a free mind mapping application written in Java that will help anyone who plans projects, for example: developers, writers, conference presenters, and students. Beyond planning, it can be used to assist decision making, organize information, and aid problem solving.

IP Innovation LLC: Patsy or Proxy?

Filed under
Legal

Linux Today: For the record, (and I realize that I might be opening myself to calls of "naive") I am not 100 percent convinced that this pioneering patent infringement lawsuit is a direct result of Microsoft's planning.

A Peek at Xubuntu Gutsy

Filed under
Ubuntu

junauza.blogspot.com: A few days ago, Ubuntu announced the Release Candidate version 7.10 of Ubuntu, Kubuntu, Edubuntu, Gobuntu, and Xubuntu codenamed "Gutsy Gibbon". I downloaded Xubuntu Gutsy RC right away to see what’s up with the new version. I then tested it to find out if it’s compatible enough with the old laptop. So after playing with the Gibbon, here’s my quick assessment.

Impressed by openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

kdedevelopers: So I replaced Kubuntu with openSUSE 10.3. All I can say is wow. I couldn't follow its development as I did with previous releases and tested only after the final version appeared. First I upgraded my desktop from 10.2 and it wasn't a pleasure as it made the system unbootable and I had to fix using a rescue console. But after having it running I was quite satisfied with it.

Other Leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Dr Watson: Who wrote Linux?

  • The love-in
  • A closer look at OpenSUSE 10.3
  • Novell CEO Ron Hovsepian: 'There Has to Be a Better Way'
  • Lady of Lourdes College goes Open Source
  • Google Desktop v1.1 Linux Beta
  • Nouveau Companion 28
  • QGRUBEditor: The GRUB Editor

Supporting Newer Atheros Devices

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: "People who had problems with unsupported Atheros devices (single chip variants found in recent laptops, macbooks, etc.) should get the latest code from CVS and test it..."

FOSS Crowd Unfazed by First Linux Patent Lawsuit

Filed under
OSS

wired blogs: So what do the Linux folks think of all this? They certainly aren't scared. Friday, the non-profit Linux advocacy group The Linux Foundation released this statement:

some early leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Opera Friday Build: Neat thumbnails, instant searching and more

  • Girlfriend Agrees To Use Linux For A Month
  • Dell's New On-Demand Desktop Streaming on Linux?
  • Insecure by Default
  • Seven Friday rants
  • Acacia Patents, Red Hat, and Novell
  • Quake Wars Linux Demo Coming Soon
  • Nokia N800 Linux tablet gets DIY extended battery backpack

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to touch-up portraits with GIMP

  • How to Tar / Untar From the Command Line
  • Encrypted Ubuntu 7.10
  • How to open a tar file in Unix or Linux
  • Howto: Set a background image for your XFCE panel
  • Digital Photo Management In Linux, Part 2

Mandriva 2008.0 rocks

Filed under
MDV

linux.com: Mandriva 2008.0, released this week, is the best version of Mandriva since 7.2. Mandriva was once known as the best distro for new users, while accommodating those more experienced. In its current incarnation, this is still so. 2008.0 is an exceptionally impressive release.

10 Rocking Features in 10 Days: Day 3: Sharing your computer with Fast User Switching

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntu.com: Yesterday we took a look at all the handy new features of X in Ubuntu 7.10 and today we turn to Fast User Switching which allows you to easily share your computer with others

What is Open Source?

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Many readers here define open source narrowly. It’s a business model, a development model, a way in which enterprise customers gain more power over their own IT. It’s all that, but it’s much more.

The BSD Community Compared to the Linux Community

Filed under
BSD

Penguin Pete: An amazing experience occurred when I began to run BSD. It was a Jedi event. I was jolted by something that suddenly stopped when I started BSD, something I hadn't been aware of until it was gone. I experienced a great calming in The Force; as if a million screaming, bitching voices suddenly shut the hell up!

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More in Tux Machines

Kubuntu 17.04 Zesty Zaphod - Kawabuntu!

Let us continue with the spring season distro testing. Next on the menu: Kubuntu. After many years of offering bland, emotionless releases, we had a cautiously reasonable Yakkety Yak edition, so me hopes are high for today. And for today, we will examine the latest Kubuntu, which officially bears the name of Zesty Zapus, but once again, like my recent Ubuntu review, my version of the distro's name is totally better. So allow me to ask thee, what is the answer to Linux, multiverse and constant forking? Read more

A switch to Android and 50 Essential Android Apps

  • Good Game: A switch to Android not as difficult as anticipated
    It’s not quite like learning a new language or how to ride a bike, but at times it does feel a little bit like both. After nearly 10 years of faithful Apple consumption — listening to iTunes, watching an Apple TV, reading iBooks — I did something completely unexpected this month: I made the leap from the neatly walled garden of Apple’s smartphone, smart watch and tablet and into the wilds of the loosely controlled world of Android gadgets. I could blame the change on a variety of must-need wearable, quasi-smart doodads, or virtual reality, or even an edge-to-edge screened smartphone that looks like you’re carrying a piece of the sky around in your pocket. But the real culprit for my leap of consumer faith isn’t one single Samsung product; it was an ecosystem of them.
  • The 50 Essential Android Apps (2017)

Red Hat and Fedora

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.