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About Tux Machines

Friday, 28 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 7:05am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 6:56am
Story Four Hidden Tools in Scribus srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 5:09am
Story Questions remain over $25 Raspberry Pi srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 4:59am
Story NYSE switches to open source srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 4:51am
Story Adventures In Computing: From OpenSuse To Ubuntu srlinuxx 04/11/2011 - 2:05am
Story Wary Puppy Linux 5.2 review srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 10:01pm
Story Scientific Linux, openSUSE, Ubuntu Tests srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 9:48pm
Story Firefox Designer Offers a Look at What Wasn’t srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 7:48pm
Story Steam on PCLinuxOS srlinuxx 03/11/2011 - 7:41pm

Linux Hates Me

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Seriously. I now believe linux is a collective conciousness which has taken steps to punish me on a constant basis. You can take your weak monotheistic religions which offer some abstract punishment in an afterlife and shove them, the LinuxGod is punishing me on a daily basis. For hours at a time.

KDE Commit Digest 51: strigi, digikam, kopete and kjs

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Commit Digest 51 has been released. Usually it contains a huge amount of interesting information - well, at least for the KDE interested people.

As usual the introduction of the Issue 51 summarizes some important information. For example the Oxygen project finished the transition of their icon names to the icon naming spec. This means that

Frugalware - Yet another new distribution

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Frugalware could be an interesting alternative for Slackware fans, as it contains much more packages than Slackware, and is much more actively developed. But for users wanting a nice distribution without too much effort: forget about Frugalware.

Full Brief

Linux Kernel to Add VMI

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The next stable update to the Linux kernel, Version 2.6.21, is slated to include a new feature submitted by VMware called VMI.

Virtualized operating system instances can enjoy performance and management benefits if their kernels are modified to communicate with the hypervisor under which they run. This arrangement is called paravirtualization.

What is Open Source?

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Linux is by far *not* the first open source "project" I have been around. As a newly minted system programmer 27 or so years ago (geez, I'm old... When did that happen?) I was first involved with a new operating system from IBM called VM/SP. VM/SP was the post anti-trust version of VM IBM created out of VM/370.

Dell and the Linux Desktop

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There’s quite a bit of speculation going on at what distribution of Linux Dell will choose to put onto its desktops or if they’ll even attempt to put Linux on the desktop.

Use key-based authentication with SSH

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It’s really simple to login with your username/password combination on the remote machine, but sometimes it can be a better idea to use key-based authentication.

Key-based authentication is where instead of authenticating that you are you with the remote machine credentials, you use a cryptographic key pair.

Prevent Firefox from overwriting your tabs

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By default when you click the Open All in Tabs option in a bookmarks folder or a live bookmark, the bookmarks are opened in different tabs replacing the current tab set you have at that time.

monitor custom programs with ps and watch

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ps is a very useful tool to list all current running processes with various info such as CPU usage, memory usage, process status, process id etc.

watch is another good tool to continuously execute some programs in infinite loop. watch allows you to make use of commands such as ps, netstat, lsof into monitoring purpose.

How to Fix broken Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

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Ubuntu Development team released ubuntu feisty fawn beta on 23rd March 2007 some of them started upgrading their edgy to feisty .If your feisty broken here is the procedure to fix that.

Boot up with a live cd, or ubuntu CD from a different partition.

Mount your feisty drive somewhere in this example i am mounting on /media/feisty

Create a directiory when do you want to mount

Who speaks for Microsoft on open source?

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Does Steve Ballmer speak for Microsoft on open source? He's the CEO, and he seems to think that open source does not exist, has no right to exist, and can be ground down with lawyers.

Or how about Brad Abrams? Is it Jason Matusow? Should we look to the Microsoft legal team, its executive ranks, or what about the geek standing in front of you on the trade show stand?

Building the XO: The Anatomy of an Activity

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Last time, we talked about installing Sugar so that you could emulate the OLPC environment on your system. Now it’s time to explore how activities work on the XO.

Finding your activities

Novell takes Microsoft’s InfoCard technology open source

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Novell is developing an open source implementation of Microsoft’s identity card technology that is functionally equivalent to the Windows software but will run on both Linux and Macintosh.

Novell steering Microsoft defectors back to Microsoft?

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Oh, my. On the one hand, Mary Jo is reporting that, just as Novell's Bruce Lowry had said, Novell's pact with Microsoft seems to be earning it back market share against Red Hat.

Here come the RHEL 5 clones

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If imitation is the sincerest form of flattery, Red Hat should be flattered. Less than two weeks after the company introduced RHEL 5 (Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5), StartCom Ltd. released the first RHEL 5 clone, StartCom Enterprise Linux AS-5.0.0.

Gentoo attempts to deal with developer conflicts

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Earlier this month, Slashdot posted a piece asking whether the Gentoo project is in "crisis." The project has responded to the issues discussed in the posting, in part, by adopting a Code of Conduct (CoC), with "proctors" who will address breaches of the CoC. So far, that move seems of limited worth.

Quicker open source editor: Emacs

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The open source Emacs editor (one of the powerhouses of UNIX computing) is a large, complex application that does everything from editing text to functioning as a complete development environment.

Debian/etch Xen: Nice, but not quite ready for me

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n my previous post I explained how I set up my new server as a Xen server in order to maximize my flexibility. It's been little over a week now and I am saddened to say that Xen has gone out the Window. While I love the flexibility, it's just not ready for me yet.

Snag 1: Running NFS

Benchmarking With VDrift

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Chris Guirl sent me a note this weekend alerting me to the release of VDrift 2007-03-23 and letting me know that this drift racing game now supports benchmarking.

Linux-Optimized Laptops: Does the Hardware Matter?

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Even though interest in server-side Linux has been steadily growing in enterprises and organizations around the world, desktop and laptop-based Linux solutions have faced a steady series of uphill climbs.

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More in Tux Machines

KNOPPIX 7.7.1 Distro Officially Released with Debian Goodies, Linux Kernel 4.7.9

Believe it or not, Klaus Knopper is still doing his thing with the KNOPPIX GNU/Linux distribution, which was just updated to version 7.7.1 to offer users the latest open source software and technologies. Read more

CentOS 6 Linux Servers Receive Important Kernel Security Patch, Update Now

We reported a couple of days ago that Johnny Hughes from the CentOS Linux team published an important kernel security advisory for users of the CentOS 7 operating system. Read more

Games for GNU/Linux

  • Why GNU/Linux ports can be less performant, a more in-depth answer
    When it comes to data handling, or rather data manipulation, different APIs can perform it in different ways. In one, you might simply be able to modify some memory and all is ok. In another, you might have to point to a copy and say "use that when you can instead and free the original then". This is not a one way is better than the other discussion - it's important only that they require different methods of handling it. Actually, OpenGL can have a lot of different methods, and knowing the "best" way for a particular scenario takes some experience to get right. When dealing with porting a game across though, there may not be a lot of options: the engine does things a certain way, so that way has to be faked if there's no exact translation. Guess what? That can affect OpenGL state, and require re-validation of an entire rendering pipeline, stalling command submission to the GPU, a.k.a less performance than the original game. It's again not really feasible to rip apart an entire game engine and redesign it just for that: take the performance hit and carry on. Note that some decisions are based around _porting_ a game. If one could design from the ground up with OpenGL, then OpenGL would likely give better performance...but it might also be more difficult to develop and test for. So there's a bit of a trade-off there, and most developers are probably going to be concerned with getting it running on Windows first, GNU/Linux second. This includes engine developers.
  • Why Linux games often perform worse than on Windows
    Drivers on Windows are tweaked rather often for specific games. You often see a "Game Ready" (or whatever term they use now) driver from Nvidia and AMD where they often state "increased performance in x game by x%". This happens for most major game releases on Windows. Nvidia and AMD have teams of people to specifically tweak the drivers for games on Windows. Looking at Nvidia specifically, in the last three months they have released six new drivers to improve performance in specific games.
  • Thoughts on 'Stellaris' with the 'Leviathans Story Pack' and latest patch, a better game that still needs work
  • Linux community has been sending their love to Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media
    This is awesome to see, people in the community have sent both Feral Interactive & Aspyr Media some little care packages full of treats. Since Aspyr Media have yet to bring us the new Civilization game, it looks like Linux users have been guilt-tripping the porters into speeding up, or just sending them into a sugar coma.
  • Feral Interactive's Linux ports may come with Vulkan sooner than we thought
  • Using Nvidia's NVENC with OBS Studio makes Linux game recording really great
    I had been meaning to try out Nvidia's NVENC for a while, but I never really bothered as I didn't think it would make such a drastic difference in recording gaming videos, but wow does it ever! I was trying to record a game recently and all other methods I tried made the game performance utterly dive, making it impossible to record it. So I asked for advice and eventually came to this way.

Leftovers: Software

  • DocKnot 1.00
    I'm a bit of a perfectionist about package documentation, and I'm also a huge fan of consistency. As I've slowly accumulated more open source software packages (alas, fewer new ones these days since I have less day-job time to work on them), I've developed a standard format for package documentation files, particularly the README in the package and the web pages I publish. I've iterated on these, tweaking them and messing with them, trying to incorporate all my accumulated wisdom about what information people need.
  • Shotwell moving along
    A new feature that was included is a contrast slider in the enhancement tool, moving on with integrating patches hanging around on Bugzilla for quite some time.
  • GObject and SVG
    GSVG is a project to provide a GObject API, using Vala. It has almost all, with some complementary, interfaces from W3C SVG 1.1 specification. GSVG is LGPL library. It will use GXml as XML engine. SVG 1.1 DOM interfaces relays on W3C DOM, then using GXml is a natural choice. SVG is XML and its DOM interfaces, requires to use Object’s properties and be able to add child DOM Elements; then, we need a new set of classes.
  • LibreOffice 5.1.6 Office Suite Released for Enterprise Deployments with 68 Fixes
    Today, October 27, 2016, we've been informed by The Document Foundation about the general availability of the sixth maintenance update to the LibreOffice 5.1 open-source and cross-platform office suite. You're reading that right, LibreOffice 5.1 got a new update not the current stable LibreOffice 5.2 branch, as The Document Foundation is known to maintain at least to versions of its popular office suite, one that is very well tested and can be used for enterprise deployments and another one that offers the latest technologies.