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Saturday, 25 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 5 Amazing Wallpapers From The Ubuntu 11.04 Submissions srlinuxx 1 19/02/2011 - 12:45am
Story Long-Term Open Source Solutions on Cities’ Radar srlinuxx 19/02/2011 - 12:35am
Story Comix is an Awesome Comics Archive Viewer for Linux srlinuxx 19/02/2011 - 12:33am
Story Why I lose interest in some projects srlinuxx 19/02/2011 - 12:31am
Story Fedora 14 screen captures srlinuxx 18/02/2011 - 9:45pm
Story Help the Project. Spread openSUSE DVDs srlinuxx 18/02/2011 - 9:42pm
Story Banshee vs. Ubuntu Linux on Revenue sharing srlinuxx 18/02/2011 - 8:10pm
Story Not All is Fair in Linux srlinuxx 18/02/2011 - 8:06pm
Story Quick Look: PureOS 3.0 srlinuxx 18/02/2011 - 8:03pm
Story Why GIMP 2.8 is not released yet srlinuxx 18/02/2011 - 6:26pm

Mmorpg Tibia offers linux-client for beta-testing

Filed under
Gaming

After several years of waiting the commercial 2D-Mmorpg Tibia now offers a linux-client in beta-status. They used to have a badly written linux-client years ago, but then abandoned support for it and now again offer a brand new one.

UNIX tips and tricks for a new user, Part 1: File maintenance tools

Filed under
News

Systems administrators can use a number of programs to maintain files in a UNIX® system from the command line. In this tutorial, you'll experiment with commands, such as cd, cp, and tar, to navigate a UNIX file system from the command line and work with files and directories. You'll also learn how to deal with file permissions and perform simple input/output.

iPod + Linux = Portable Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Like millions of other people, I, too, am fascinated by Apple's iPod. Some critics might try to say that it's just another music player, but its appeal goes much deeper than that. The iPod is the definition of modern pop culture, and whether they actually need one or not, people want to get a hold of them because they're, well, cool. Is there anything wrong with that?

Automatic update of packages using cron-apt

Filed under
HowTos

cron-apt Contains a tool that is run by a cron job at regular intervals. By default it just updates the package list and download new packages without installing. You can instruct it to run anything that you can do with apt-get (or aptitude).

Canonical seeks profit from free Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Canonical is the 65-employee start-up behind a popular version of Linux called "Ubuntu". The company is betting that it can win a place in the market using a strategy that dominant Linux seller Red Hat has dropped.

Getting IPTables to survive a reboot

Filed under
HowTos

Debian does not provide an initscript for iptables by default. This does however not mean that it is impossible to get firewall rules to survive a reboot.

Insurance firm sues Microsoft over Xbox house fire

Filed under
Legal

AN INSURANCE COMPANY acting on behalf of Melvin Young has sued Microsoft because his house suffered an extensive fire because an Xbox malfunctioned on January 5th last year.

A Review of Slackware 11

Filed under
Reviews
Slack

I've been using Linux for well over 4 years now as my primary OS. I started way back with Slackware, and to this day I can't stop slackin. With the newly released Slackware 11, let's see how much has changed since I first fell head over heals for the distro so many years ago.

$100 Laptop Price Increases

Filed under
OLPC

In an ironic twist, the anticipated price of the 2007 model of the “$100 laptop” will be $138. Announced last month by Nicholas Negroponte, the chairman of the One Laptop Per Child association, the projected price will drop to $100 by the end of 2008 and $50 in 2010.

The announcement came at the second annual AMD Global Vision Conference in Pasadena, Calif.

In Memoriam: Ralph Griswold(1934-2006)

Filed under
Obits

Ralph Griswold, creator of SNOBOL and Icon, former staff member at Bell Labs and Professor of Computer Science at the University of Arizona, died 4 October 2006, losing a bout of cancer.

ATI R300: Open v. Closed Drivers on a ThinkPad R52

Filed under
Software

Five months ago to the day, we had compared the open-source and fglrx display drivers here at Phoronix for the ATI R200 generation components. However, how do the drivers compare for the newer R300 generation components? We at Phoronix have analyzed the open-source and official closed-source drivers and have some interesting results to share today.

SUSE Linux 10: easy to use, cheaper to run

Filed under
SUSE

Novell CTO Ross Chevalier is traveling the continent giving demonstrations of Novell SUSE Linux 10 Enterprise Desktop.

SGI Expanding the Reach of Linux

Filed under
Interviews

Steve Neuner, the director for Linux engineering at SGI, has been pushing Linux up the scalability ladder for the better part of the 21st century. In August of this year, SGI announced that they were able to run a single system image of the Linux OS over 1024 processors. HPCwire caught up with him before the conference to ask him about the Linux improvements and where the future of single system image scalability is headed.

Novell aims to test your Linux skill level

Filed under
SUSE

Novell is this week is expected to launch on its training Web site an online Linux skills assessment tool that will give you immediate feedback on your level of Linux knowledge and recommend some training.

Insecurity in Open Source

Filed under
OSS

Debates over what methods result in the best software often pit those who favor an open-source approach against proponents of proprietary, or closed-source, development. Conventional wisdom holds that open-source software should have fewer security flaws than proprietary software.

Review: Xandros Desktop 4.0

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Xandros Systems was so kind as to provide OSNews with the top of the line version of their product, which includes, among other things, complete copies of Versora Progression Desktop, CrossOver Office, and various non-Free drivers and utilities.

Linux, Mac and/or WIndows? And where?

Filed under
OS

Linux system administrators should consider getting their MCSE. What? That’s correct. You might also consider buying a Mac Mini desktop and practice with it at home. I’m serious, so take this recommendation to heart.

Massachusetts IT Chief Quits, Cites Lack of IT Funds

Filed under
OSS

Louis Gutierrez had been a champion of open standards and was a strong supporter of the state's plan to standardize on the OpenDocument Format. His resignation could slow the ODF rollout.

Drupal CMS On An ISPConfig Server Within 10 Easy Steps

Filed under
Drupal

Drupal is a nice CMS, which is easy to use but it requires some special server settings. I wrote this “how to” for those who want to run this CMS on their ISPConfig server. Probably you can setup Drupal in different ways but I prefer the way descibed here.

In this how to, I will use just as an example:

- Drupal version 4.7.3. for a single drupal site configuration.

Ohio LinuxFest Logs Another Big Year

Filed under
Linux

What do you call it when 1,000 beer drinkers get together for a feast? A Beerfest.

What do you call it when 1,000 Linux user and fans line up for a feast? A Linuxfest.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more