Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Monday, 27 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

EnGarde — Secure Linux Server

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

polishlinux: This will be an unusual review, due to the fact that the distribution under review doesn’t have an X server, and you don’t really need to login on it to work… This review is about EnGarde Secure Server 3.0.16 developed by Guardian Digital company with the help of the community.

Fedora 7: Community remix

Filed under
Linux

red hat mag: One of the popular features of Fedora 7 is the ability to remix Fedora and build your own custom version. Now don’t get me wrong–building a new distribution is nice. But what about those who wish to create their own Fedora-based project?

The 64-Bit Experience With Ubuntu Feisty Fawn

Filed under
Ubuntu

Caitlyn Martin: Over the past couple of weeks I’ve been able to borrow a friend’s laptop. She has the 64-bit version of Ubuntu Feisty Fawn installed. This is my first chance to play with 64-bit Linux extensively on a laptop.

Liferea

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Feed technology is great - it allows you to have your favourite sites to keep you updated with the latest content and push it out to you. There are many different reader applications out there, from the web-based, to the desktop and even in the mobile space. One such desktop application for Linux and other Unix platforms is Liferea.

Big savings with Linux desktop: IBM, Novell

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet: IBM and Novell are set to do battle with Microsoft on the desktop with the launch of a new open-source software bundle that promises savings for users.

Editing music scores with free software

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Not everyone needs to work with music scores on their computers, but if you're someone who does enter, edit, or store sheet music electronically, you can choose among many free software options.

Amarok Plasmification

Filed under
KDE

amarok blogs: we've decided that for amarok 2.0 we want to emphasize what used to be called the "context browser" in amarok 1.x speak. we decided to break out the context browser into its own central widget.

Desktop Linux: That dog will mount

Filed under
Linux

the register: The Linux desktop reminds us of a dog humping a table leg. It's both fun and disturbing to watch, but ultimately there's very little payoff from the exercise.

New Software Interface with 1-Click Installation Online

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org news: Software.opensuse.org got a completely new face which improves the downloading of the desired openSUSE distribution a lot. It comes with the new look and feel following www.opensuse.org.

Linux: Replacing atime With relatime

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In a recent lkml thread, Linus Torvalds was involved in a discussion about mounting filesystems with the noatime option for better performance, "'noatime,data=writeback' will quite likely be *quite* noticeable (with different effects for different loads), but almost nobody actually runs that way."

Fedora 8 Test 1 Live Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: The first test release for Fedora 8 is finally out the door after the usual delays we've come to expect with each Fedora release cycle. New in the Fedora 8 Test 1 Desktop Live CD (GNOME edition) is GNOME 2.19.5, an early Linux 2.6.23 kernel, and integrated blog entry posting software among some other minor alterations. We have screenshots to share and will cover Fedora 8 more in the coming weeks.

Mozilla security patches coming as soon as f***ing possible

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozilla links: It all started during the Black Hat security conference last week when Mike Shaver, Mozilla Director of Ecosystem Development handed his business card to Robert Hansen (a.k.a. RSnake) adding “Ten F***ing Days” to it.

Also: Color management support added to Firefox 3

i’m excited about the future of gnome

Filed under
Software

blogs.gnome.org: i’d like to take this time to list some things that are happening right now in the gnome community that have me very excited. these are the projects that are actively improving the future of the gnome desktop.

Deconstructing the Latest Netcraft Survey

Filed under
Linux

linux today: Supposedly the big news coming out of LinuxWorld today is that Microsoft’s IIS server is “catching up” to Apache. According to Netcraft, their latest Aug 2007 survey shows more very large gains for Microsoft technologies on the web. "What does this mean for Apache? Is Apache dying? Is Microsoft set to take top spot as the web platform of choice?

Linux kernel maintainer allays fears about forking

Filed under
Linux

InfoWorld: Making separate but critical points about the path of the Linux kernel, the maintainer of the kernel on Monday stressed there is no need to worry about forking and not to expect a move to the GNU General Public License (GPL) version 3.

Controlling and managing Edubuntu users' desktops

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: The community-driven Edubuntu project aims to create a version of Ubuntu specially tailored for use in primary and secondary education. Perhaps the most useful feature present in the Edubuntu OS is the Linux Terminal Server Project environment, whose applications are not limited just to eduction.

Interview: Chris Mason about Btrfs

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

/home/liquidat: When Btrfs was officially announced I was very interested in the development because it was supposed to address several issues of today’s file systems. After a couple of early development releases I asked Chris if he would be willing to ask me some questions about Btrfs.

I’ve installed OpenSUSE 10.2, here’s my first impressions…

Filed under
SUSE

tuxtoday: I recently built myself a new computer. So for my new computer I first installed Ubuntu, then Kubuntu, and now.. OpenSUSE 10.2.

openSUSE Guiding Principles: nice, but weird

Filed under
SUSE

beranger: The Final draft for openSUSE Guiding Principles is very nice and a pleasant reading, but as it should serve as sort of a Constitution (or at least as a defining writ), it has a weird way of putting the cart before the horses.

Open source upheaval

Filed under
OSS

InfoWorld: "I don't use the word 'evil,'" says Mike Evans – though he acknowledges that some of his customers do see proprietary commercial software vendors that way.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Red Hat News

Leftovers: Ubuntu

Linux Devices

  • AsteroidOS 1.0 Alpha on the Asus Zenwatch 3
    In a previous article, I published a small userspace image and Linux kernel for the Zenwatch 3 that enables root access with SSH over USB on the watch. By now, I reached my initial goal to get AsteroidOS, the alternative Android Wear operating system, running on the Zenwatch 3. Similar to SailfishOS and Ubuntu Touch, AsteroidOS uses the original Android kernel - a patched Linux kernel - with a GNU/Linux userspace that, in turn, also uses some of the original, closed-source Android libraries to access certain hardware like the GPU. As the Android libraries expect a different software ecosystem, e.g., a different C library called bionic, we cannot simply call the Android libraries from within a common GNU/Linux application. Instead, we need an additional software layer that translates between the Android and the common GNU/Linux world. This layer is called libhybris.
  • How Ironic: Harman Kardon’s Microsoft Cortana Speaker Is Powered by Linux
    Harman Kardon, the company recently acquired by Samsung, has developed its very own Cortana speaker, which is very similar to the Amazon Echo but featuring Microsoft’s famous digital assistant. And since Cortana is the key feature of this little device, it only makes sense for Harman Kardon to turn to Windows 10 to power the device. And yet, it looks like the so-called Harman Kardon is actually running Linux.
  • MontaVista® Launches Carrier Grade eXpress®(CGX) 2.2 Linux® for 5G and IoT at MWC 2017
  • The Numbers Article for Mobile in 2017 - All the Statistics You Could Ask For
    Mobile is the hottest industry. Banking and payments are rushing to mobile. Governments doing healthcare and education with mobile. Travel from airlines to taxis to trains and busses to hotel bookings is going mobile. Your driver's licence is migrating to the mobile phone as are your keys to your home. And all the other big tech stories from Internet of Things (IoT) to 'Big Data' analytics to Cloud computing - are all dependent on mobile. And next week we have the massive industry event in Barcelona, Mobile World Congress. My brand new TomiAhonen Almanac 2017 is now finished and is released today. So this is the perfect time to do my annual 'State of Mobile' blog of the major statistics. What are the big numbers. Lets start with reach. Yes, mobile is by far the most widely-spread communication technology humankind has ever witnessed.
  • Tizen Store Expands Its Service Coverage to 222 Countries
    The Tizen Store, as the name suggests, is the Tizen Application Store for developers to publish their free and paid for Tizen apps. In April 2015, we saw the store expand it’s coverage to include 182 countries, which was mainly for FREE apps, but we saw this as setting the foundation for providing paid for apps further down the road.

Android Leftovers