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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 26 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Canonical Officially Sets the Release Date for Ubuntu 14.10 (Utopic Unicorn) Roy Schestowitz 05/06/2014 - 6:59am
Story The Linux Kernel: An Explanation In Layman’s Terms Roy Schestowitz 05/06/2014 - 6:56am
Story Cavium ARMs New Server Chips Roy Schestowitz 05/06/2014 - 6:53am
Story Linux Mint 17 Review Round-Up Roy Schestowitz 05/06/2014 - 6:46am
Story Kate and KDevelop sprint in January 2014 Roy Schestowitz 05/06/2014 - 6:43am
Story Alpine 3.0.0 released Roy Schestowitz 05/06/2014 - 6:40am
Story Red Hat Software Collections 1.1 Now Generally Available Rianne Schestowitz 04/06/2014 - 8:42pm
Story In the Matrix of Mobile, Linux Is Zion Rianne Schestowitz 04/06/2014 - 8:28pm
Story Backup and Recovery OS Clonezilla Live 2.2.3-17 Now Available for Download Rianne Schestowitz 04/06/2014 - 8:06pm
Story Linux Mint 17 improves multiple monitor, update and driver support Rianne Schestowitz 04/06/2014 - 6:51pm

People of openSUSE: Marco Michna

Filed under
Interviews

opensuse.org: This week we meet #openSUSE IRC supporter, and openSUSE Quality Assurance team member Marco ‘daemon’ Michna in one more ‘People of openSUSE’ interview!

Linux Mint - The Distro to Fill the Missing Gap

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Linux

lebokov21.com: Recently, I have been trying out the Linux Mint operating system which caught my attention in DistroWatch.com. Linux Mint is a variant of Ubuntu with integrated media codecs. After using Linux Mint for a few hours, I can immediately see that it is trying to get the good things all together in one place.

Linux everywhere

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Linux

andyhollyhead.wordpress: Linux does seem to be everywhere nowadays. Take yesterday as a case in point. I checked the order status of my Elonex One, and then caught the train to the Queen Elizabeth hospital, watching the in-train tv which is powered by Linux.

Want a blog? Get a LifeType

Filed under
Software

linux.com: LifeType is a full-featured GPL blogging platform designed for use with a MySQL database and PHP. You'll need access to a server in order to properly install and use LifeType, but the installation is easy with LifeType's wizard, which can even create your MySQL database and all the tables you need, automatically.

Asus releases application kit for Eee PC coders

Filed under
Software

reghardware.co.uk: Asus has posted a Software Development Kit (SDK) for the Eee PC, the better to help coders write new programs to run on the elfin laptop's Xandros Linux distribution.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • HTML 5 Support by Browser: Opera Continues to Lead the Pack

  • Linux Install Podcast Episode 48 Gentoo part 3
  • Mormons for open source
  • Welcome Lumiera! (video editor)
  • XO Laptop Training Begins in Peru
  • WUSTL Open-source innovation conference April 4-5
  • Linux Product Insider
  • KNetStats
  • Top 10 Reasons to Avoid Ubuntu
  • Another Reason Microsoft's OSP Isn't Good Enough
  • SFLC Releases Paper on Shareware Redistribution of Free Software
  • Impossible thing #5: Open hardware, from the LART to the Common
  • Plans for the Linux-next Tree

Comparison of binary package formats

Filed under
Software

abclinuxu.cz: The general purpose of binary packages, package management systems, is to provide a prebuilt software to easily maintain systems and applications programs so that the system remains consistent and its resources are used in a efficient way. There are various package formats, but probably most widespread are RPM, deb and TGZ formats.

All About Linux 2008: Linux distros I’ve loved before

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Linux

crunchgear.com: In honor of Linux week, I’d like to talk about some distros I’ve known and loved. This isn’t an exhaustive list and many aren’t really distros, but it’s more an exercise in nostalgia than anything else.

more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Creating a Home Inventory with F-Spot (video)

  • Upgrading openSUSE 10.3 to 11.0 (Factory)
  • How to install ATI Video Card in you linux System
  • Easy Multiple File Patching And Patch Removal On Linux And Unix
  • How to Split apache Logs With vlogger in debian etch
  • Gentoo Portage USE Flag Descriptions

Mozilla's Asa Dotzler on Firefox

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Interviews
Moz/FF

blog.wired.com: Asa Dotzler has been there from the beginning. As Mozilla's director of community development, he's had a hand in birthing some of the web's most successful open-source software projects, most notably the Mozilla and Firefox web browsers.

Review - Adobe Photoshop Express

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Software

blog.eracc.com: I will confess I am a GIMP guy on Linux. Others will recommend GIMP only to be told that GIMP is not as good as Photoshop. Now we all know that is really just personal opinion, not objective fact. In any case there is now a Photoshop that should even work on Linux.

Mac is the first to fall in Pwn2Own hack contest

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OS

channelregister.co.uk: A brand-new MacBook Air running a fully patched version of Leopard was the first to fall in a contest that pitted the security of machines running OS X, Vista and Linux. The exploit took less than two minutes to pull off.

Full Circle Magazine Issue 11 Out

Filed under
Ubuntu

It’s time again! Issue #11 is out - one more until our 1 year anniversary. This month: Linux Mint vs Ubuntu, Review of an old Lenovo 3000 C200 laptop running Ubuntu, and Howto: iPod Classic & Amarok.

15 Open-Source Business Influencers

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OSS

eweek.com: The influence of the open-source model on software development is increasing. Here, eWEEK names 15 people driving this IT revolution.

Put your Linux Distro on a Live CD

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Linux

makeuseof.com: An oddity of open source operating systems is the Live CD. These live systems are full versions of the operating system that run completely from the given medium. Live CDs originally came from the old boot-disk-for-diagnosis idea. Live CDs have now become a way to test-drive a distro before installing it.

more OOXML coverage

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OSS
  • UK may make last-minute U-turn on OOXML

  • Kenya Changes From Yes to Abstain! Denmark Says No; EU Commission Investigating Poland
  • President of EU Academy for Standardisation criticizes OOXML, says duplicative standards conflict with WTO rules
  • Germany Stays in the OOXML "Yes" Column
  • Oh Miguel...
  • OOXML Vote Coverage

Red Hat Revenue Outlook Tops Forecasts

Filed under
Linux

reuters.com: Red Hat Inc issued a revenue outlook on Thursday that topped Wall Street forecasts, saying that its business software is poised for strong growth in a weak economy because it costs less than rival products.

Open source and the shrinking waterhole

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OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Despite a lot of brave talk at OSBC there is little doubt that open source is heading into its first recession. This recession starts just as many open source vendors are starting to look beyond their own forges for sales. I’ve heard people say they’re even hiring salesmen.

Linux Live CDs: A Convenient Approach to Personal Computing

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Linux

desicritics.org: Linux platform for computing is difficult to understand for an average personal computer user, the traditional Microsoft Windows Operating System users especially find it inconvenient with excessive amount of options Linux presents. I would like to focus on Linux Live CDs as a way for an individual computer user to simplify computing.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Solved: Desktop Recording with Sound

  • How To Backup Your iPod Music on Linux
  • How To Use Filezilla As An SFTP Client
  • Automatic FTP Backup System - A Very Simple Solution
  • Introduction BackupPC
  • How to create a shortcut in your desktop?
  • Top Tip: How do I remove Grub?
  • Four Table Tips for OpenOffice Writer
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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Baidu puts open source deep learning into smartphones

A year after it open sourced its PaddlePaddle deep learning suite, Baidu has dropped another piece of AI tech into the public domain – a project to put AI on smartphones. Mobile Deep Learning (MDL) landed at GitHub under the MIT license a day ago, along with the exhortation “Be all eagerness to see it”. MDL is a convolution-based neural network designed to fit on a mobile device. Baidu said it is suitable for applications such as recognising objects in an image using a smartphone's camera. Read more

AMD and Linux Kernel

  • Ataribox runs Linux on AMD chip and will cost at least $250
    Atari released more details about its Ataribox game console today, disclosing for the first time that the machine will run Linux on an Advanced Micro Devices processor and cost $250 to $300. In an exclusive interview last week with GamesBeat, Ataribox creator and general manager Feargal Mac (short for Mac Conuladh) said Atari will begin a crowdfunding campaign on Indiegogo this fall and launch the Ataribox in the spring of 2018. The Ataribox will launch with a large back catalog of the publisher’s classic games. The idea is to create a box that makes people feel nostalgic about the past, but it’s also capable of running the independent games they want to play today, like Minecraft or Terraria.
  • Linux 4.14 + ROCm Might End Up Working Out For Kaveri & Carrizo APUs
    It looks like the upstream Linux 4.14 kernel may end up playing nicely with the ROCm OpenCL compute stack, if you are on a Kaveri or Carrizo system. While ROCm is promising as AMD's open-source compute stack complete with OpenCL 1.2+ support, its downside is that for now not all of the necessary changes to the Linux kernel drivers, LLVM Clang compiler infrastructure, and other components are yet living in their upstream repositories. So for now it can be a bit hairy to setup ROCm compute on your own system, especially if running a distribution without official ROCm packages. AMD developers are working to get all their changes upstreamed in each of the respective sources, but it's not something that will happen overnight and given the nature of Linux kernel development, etc, is something that will still take months longer to complete.
  • Latest Linux kernel release candidate was a sticky mess
    Linus Torvalds is not noted as having the most even of tempers, but after a weekend spent scuba diving a glitch in the latest Linux kernel release candidate saw the Linux overlord merely label the mess "nasty". The release cycle was following its usual cadence when Torvalds announced Linux 4.14 release candidate 2, just after 5:00PM on Sunday, September 24th.
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.14 LTS
    Development of the Linux 4.14 kernel series continues with the second Release Candidate (RC) milestone, which Linus Torvalds himself announces this past weekend. The update brings more updated drivers and various improvements. Linus Torvalds kicked off the development of Linux kernel 4.14 last week when he announced the first Release Candidate, and now the second RC is available packed full of goodies. These include updated networking, GPU, and RDMA drivers, improvements to the x86, ARM, PowerPC, PA-RISC, MIPS, and s390 hardware architectures, various core networking, filesystem, and documentation changes.

Red Hat: ‘Hybrid Cloud’, University of Alabama, Red Hat Upgrades Ansible and Expectations