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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Tab Effects - Xgl kinda effect for Firefox tabs

Filed under
Moz/FF

Tab Effect is a Firefox extension that provides transitional effect (similar to Xgl) when switching the tabs (Check the screenshot). It’s a cool idea and could open the door for the development of more 3D effects in the browser.

BitTyrant questions assumptions about BitTorrent

Filed under
Software

Conventional wisdom says that BitTorrent achieves superior download performance over competing peer-to-peer (P2P) systems because the protocol discourages those who download without uploading in turn, creating an environment where all participants act fairly. A University of Washington (UW) research paper says otherwise, and its authors have a BitTorrent client to prove it.

Open Source Software Closer To Commercial Enterprise Software

Filed under
OSS

The odds are good that the LAMP stack is running somewhere inside your company. The acronym refers to the foundational foursome of the open-source movement: the Linux operating system, Apache Web server, MySQL database and, collectively, the Perl, PHP and Python programming languages.

Legends: Free multiplayer game

Filed under
Gaming

Legends is an online multiplayer game with a strong emphasis on teamwork. Similar in style to the game Tribes. Legends is available for both Windows and Linux.

Dell's secret Linux fling

Filed under
Linux

Dell's love affair with Linux is a clandestine affair these days, conducted in secret, away from disapproving eyes. But now the pair have been spotted in China.

Playing Music in Linux

Filed under
Software

There are a lot of music players available for Linux. If most of them were junk it would be easy to choose one to use regularly, but that's not the case. There are many good quality players, but they all have different features. This article is meant to assist you in choosing the one that's right for you. Try different ones to see which you like best.

RMS transcript on free software and the future of freedom

Filed under
OSS

Below is the table of contents for a transcript I just put online of a 2006 talk by Richard Stallman on "Free Software and the Future of Freedom".

How To Resize ext3 Partitions Without Losing Data

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This article is about resizing ext3 partitions without losing data. It shows how to shrink and enlarge existing ext3 partitions and how to merge two ext3 partitions. This can be quite useful if you do not use LVM and you realize that your existing partitioning does not meet your actual needs anymore.

Accounting Vendors Block Linux Server Use

Filed under
Linux

We all know Microsoft views Linux as a serious threat and will do just about anything to discourage its use. But why would application vendors who actually face competition from Microsoft help it out in this regard? That's what one reader was wondering after discovering that his customers could no longer use a Linux server with their favorite accounting packages.

Hands on with the Nokia N800

Filed under
Hardware

At this week's Consumer Electronics Show, Nokia introduced the Nokia N800 Internet Tablet, the successor to the Nokia 770. The N800 is more than a beefed-up 770, as it adds a few features not available on the first device. I had a chance to spend about an hour with Nokia's N800 team and get a feel for how the $399/€399 N800 stacks up against its predecessor yesterday at CES and it looks promising.

Open-source system helps victims cope with disasters

Filed under
OSS

VICTIMS of natural disasters will be the first to say that the aftermath of a major flood, earthquake or landslide is a disaster in itself. There is the extreme difficulty of finding the missing and recovering the dead. The victims of the landslide that buried Barangay Guinsaugon in St. Bernard, Southern Leyte, however, had a relatively easier time dealing with their crisis. This is due to the cooperation between IBM Philippines and the National Disaster Coordinating Council.

Red Hat's Fedora project unites Core and Extras efforts

Filed under
Linux

The Fedora Linux project, which is sponsored by Red Hat Inc and provides the core code for its Linux distributions, is set for a reorganization that will unite its Core and Extras package efforts.

10 Signs you've been using Firefox too long...

Filed under
Humor

1. You sit right next to a window but you still just look at your ForecastFox icon to see what it's like outside.

2. You fumble with the TV remote for a minute before remembering that you can't open another channel in a new tab.

KDE 4: Sonnet

Filed under
KDE

The KDE promotion teams gains momentum with the weekly “The Road to KDE 4″ news. Hidden in this weeks release about Koffice you will find some words about Sonnet - the KSpell replacement and therefore the framework that will support you with spell checking.

License compliance issues could affect all BSD-derived distributions

Filed under
Legal

The Gentoo/FreeBSD project, which combines the FreeBSD kernel with Gentoo Linux design principles, is in a fix. Its lead developer, Diego "Flameeyes" Pettenò, discovered licensing issues while working on the libkvm library and the start-stop-daemon -- and Pettenò says that the problem might not be limited to his project, but could trap other BSD-derived projects as well.

Elive rl2 -- Call it what you want Elive makes Enlightenment work

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

There is always something interesting afloat in my email box. I had been working with my new laptop to get another second timer Elive to work, which came out on Christmas day. Elive, the distro named as the fastest climber on distrowatch for 2006, was one of my favorite suprises and one where I truly ended up leaving a distro on my laptop until it died later in the year. So once I published the Dream, of course I get a couple of emails letting me know that Elive also had a great new release out and where was my updated review?

Linux Invades CES: Toys and joys the Linux way

Filed under
Linux

The 2007 International Consumer Electronic Show is one of the ultimate tech-toy and gadget shows on the planet. There's something for nearly anyone, and while not quite a household word, Linux technology has gained rapid stature in the consumer-electronics industry, as demonstrated by vastly increased cognizance of both Linux users and Linux embedded technology.

Microsoft, Novell and Unintended Consequences

Filed under
Microsoft

Remember when AOL thought it was doing the world's researchers a big favor and made a boatload of online user behavior data openly available? Remember the unintended consequences? Well, thanks to Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's recent transparency on his beliefs about Linux and Windows, we have a similar unintended educational consequence in the works.

The Road to KDE 4: New KOffice Technologies

Filed under
KDE

In this weeks' edition of the Road to KDE 4, we'll take a look at the up and coming KWord 2.0 as part of the KOffice project. KWord 1.6.1 is already a powerful KDE-integrated word processor, but with KDE 4 technologies, KWord 2.0 promises to be among the most powerful free word processors available.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.