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Thursday, 24 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Basics of Open Source Software Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2015 - 5:07am
Story Red Hat creates open source enterprise grade foundation for Cloud Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2015 - 1:46am
Story PC-BSD 11.0-CURRENT Images Now Available! Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2015 - 1:37am
Story elementary misses the point Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2015 - 1:27am
Story Android Circuit: Galaxy S6 On Sale March 22, I/O 2015 Dates, S6 Edge Is The Fastest Smartphone Rianne Schestowitz 14/02/2015 - 1:01am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 11:32pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 11:25pm
Story CC BY 4.0 and CC BY-SA 4.0 added to our list of free licenses Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 11:20pm
Story Spreadtrum Officially Announces Support for the Tizen OS Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 11:07pm
Story Hitachi captures open source big data firm Pentaho for $600m Roy Schestowitz 13/02/2015 - 10:48pm

How to export your Firefox 3.0 full profile to Firefox 3.1

Filed under
HowTos

This article explains how to move a full profile (addons, themes, cookies, browsing history, passwords and so on) from Firefox 3.0.x to Firefox 3.1.x beta or any other version, but it also works for synchronizing Firefox on 2 different computers or backing up a full profile of Firefox.

Read about moving a FF 3.0 profile to FF 3.1x here.

unrelated downtime

Filed under
Site News

Well, just as I posted the "all is well" blog entry, we suffered a power outage here.

How To Chroot Apache 2 Web Server Under Red Hat / CentOS Linux

Filed under
Linux
Software
Security

A chroot on Red Hat / CentOS / Fedora Linux operating changes the apparent disk root directory for the Apache process and its children. Once this is done attacker or other php / perl / python scripts cannot access or name files outside that directory. This is called a "chroot jail" for Apache. You should never ever run a web server without jail. There should be privilege separation between web server and rest of the system.

OS shoot-out: Windows vs. Mac OS X vs. Linux

Filed under
OS

infoworld.com: The Mac's been on a roll, both due to its highly regarded Mac OS X Leopard operating system and to an unhappy reception for Microsoft's Windows Vista. The result: For the first time in memory, the Mac's market share has hit 9.1 percent, and Windows' market share has dipped below 90 percent. (Linux distributions make up the rest.)

The Other Secret to Red Hat’s Success: A Magazine (No Joke)

Filed under
Linux

thevarguy.com: What’s the biggest secret to Red Hat’s success in a down economy? Plenty of pundits think it’s Linux and JBoss open source middleware. But The VAR Guy has another theory:

Alan Cox and the End of an Era

Filed under
Linux

computerworlduk.com: In the beginning, free software was an activity conducted on the margins - using spare time on a university's computers, or the result of lonely bedroom hacking. One of the key moments in the evolution of free software was when hackers began to get jobs.

The future of open source

Filed under
OSS

infoworld.com: There's no question that the open source community is a passionate one -- and one with significant influence on technology directions and options. We're way past the days when people asked if Linux or Apache was safe to depend on in business. Open source is now a mainstream part of the technology fabric. 11 leaders outline the challenges and opportunities ahead.

BREAKING: compiz++ branch hits git

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Ladies and Gentlemen what you are seeing here may well be the future of compiz as we know it, in a new compiz branch called compiz++ which allows for really neat things like:

GoblinX Releases G:Micro 3.0.beta01

Filed under
Linux

GoblinX just released the first beta of the next stable release.

"Merry Christmas!! The GoblinX Project is proud to announce the first beta of the next stable release. The G:Micro 3.0 beta 01 is released."

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Sudo: Running a Command with Root Priviledges

  • Epic Troll #2: BN continues to twist the facts
  • openSUSE Download Numbers
  • VLC Media Player To Receive VDPAU Support
  • Save time managing multiple systems with Parallel SSH
  • Boss by day, gamer by night: Tech leaders' favorite video games
  • Quickly get up to 5% more disk space from your ext3 volumes
  • How to set the date on your Linux machine
  • GNOME 2.25.3 Released A Week Late
  • How fast is your X performing?
  • Autodistro?
  • OpenSUSE 11.1 and nVidia == AWESOME!!
  • TED follows Negroponte to Colombia to deliver GNU/Linux XO laptops
  • Bill Gates – Enigmatic As Ever!
  • Mozilla Developer News Dec 23
  • MySQL: Find Out Which Table is Consuming Resources
  • Sabayon 4 & future Entropy

What If Windows Told You What It Was Really Doing

Filed under
Microsoft
Humor

linuxloop.com: Reading about Canonicals’ plans for application notifications, I got to wondering if the operating system could tell you what it was doing, too. Then I started wondering what would happen if Windows told you what it was really doing…

A Penguin Deathmatch? Fedora 10 vs. Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Linux

tarnaeluin.wordpress: After several weeks of trying I finally had to give in to my sweaty and now pruney hands. I could not get the heat out of my Ubuntu install on my T60p laptop. Last night I grabbed the Fedora 10 ISO.

ubuntu stuff

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Ubuntu Jaunty Jackalope

  • Ubuntu Enrolls At Cornell College
  • Solution for Ubuntu 8.10 and RTL8187B WiFi problem
  • Singapore supports Ubuntu!
  • bullies of linux
  • Notifications, Popups and U
  • Learning from Ubuntu and Canonical
  • Vista is dying slowly. Apple is a dead end. But Ubuntu needs to grow up.

Bored (or Broke) on the Holidays? Develop a Funambol GNOME Evolution Plugin

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com/blog: The mission, should you choose to accept it: Develop a GUI-plugin, based on SyncEvolution to easily, visually sync Evolution to the Funambol SyncML servers.

The top 5 Linux myths: Why you shouldn’t fear the penguin

Filed under
Linux

gadgetell.com: As Christmas approaches and Hanukkah comes along to the later days, there’s a chance you might be expecting a new computer, or perhaps even a netbook. Now, what to the do with the old computer?

Oh Its Beautiful

Filed under
MDV

lazytechguy.com: These were the exact words from my wife's mouth when she saw my Mandriva 2009 install. I choose the KDE 4 desktop which is eye-candy in itself, but Mandriva devs have put in a lot of effort and made KDE look much more adoring.

Also: Mandriva Linux and your Blackberry

IE's European share falls under 60%, Firefox's growth stalls

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Fewer than 60% of European Web users run Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer, while more than 31% have switched to Mozilla's Firefox, a French-based metrics company reported yesterday.

Intel Linux Graphics Performance Q4'08

phoronix.com: The past year has brought several invasive changes to the Intel Linux graphics stack with the introduction of the Graphics Execution Manager for GPU memory management within the kernel, support for the Direct Rendering Infrastructure 2, and kernel mode-setting finally getting ready to enter the limelight.

Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring Alpha 1 released

Filed under
MDV

The first pre-release of Mandriva Linux 2009 Spring is now available. This alpha concentrates on updating to the major desktop components of the distribution, including KDE 4.2 Beta 2, GNOME 2.25.2, Xfce 4.6 Beta 2, X.org server 1.5, and kernel 2.6.28 rc8. It is also the first distribution to introduce the major new Tcl/Tk release, 8.6.

The innovations of Linux 2.6.28

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The Ext4 file system leaves its main development phase and will soon be ripe for productive use. Major renovation work on the code for memory and disk management promises GPU speed increases and better scalability. Hundreds of new and revised drivers improve hardware compatibility significantly.

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Foundation: New Members, Certifications and Microsoft Entryism

ETSI/GNU/Linux-based MANO

  • ETSI Open Source MANO announces Release FOUR, moving faster than ever
    ETSI is pleased to announce the availability of OSM Release FOUR. Bringing a large set of new features and enhancements, this version is the most ambitious and innovative OSM Release to date and constitutes a huge leap forward in terms of functionality, user experience and maturity. This new Release brings substantial progress thanks to a number of architectural improvements, which result in a more efficient behaviour and much leaner footprint – up to 75% less RAM consumption. Additionally, its new northbound interface, aligned with ETSI NFV work, and the brand-new cloud-native setup, facilitate OSM’s installation and operation, while making OSM more open and simpler to integrate with pluggable modules and external systems, such as the existing OSS.
  • Open Source MANO Release FOUR lands
    In monitoring, ETSI says OSM Release FOUR's alarm and metric settings are easier to use, and a new policy manager adds push notifications and reactive policy configuration, which the standards body says “opens the door to closed-loop operations”. The monitoring module uses Apache Kafka as its message passing bus, and the module also implements a flexible plugin model so sysadmins can BYO monitoring environment.

today's howtos part 2

Programming: GitLab, Security, Power and Jakarta EE

  • GitLab 10.8 open sources push mirroring
    GitLab 10.8 was released this week with the open sourcing of a highly requested feature. The company announced its push mirroring capability is now open sourced. Push mirroring was originally introduced as a paid feature, but GitLab says it is one of the most frequently requested to be moved into the open-source codebase. This move will add a few new use cases for GitLab Core users, such as freelance developers being able to mirror client repos and users migrating to GitLab being able to use push mirroring to ease the migration path.
  • How Security Can Bridge the Chasm with Development
    Enhancing the relationships between security and engineering is crucial for improving software security. These six steps will bring your teams together. There's always been a troublesome rift between enterprise security teams and software developers. While the friction is understandable, it's also a shame, because the chasm between these teams makes it all the more challenging to build quality applications that are both great to use and safe.
  • Which Programming Languages Use the Least Electricity?
    Can energy usage data tell us anything about the quality of our programming languages? Last year a team of six researchers in Portugal from three different universities decided to investigate this question, ultimately releasing a paper titled “Energy Efficiency Across Programming Languages.” They ran the solutions to 10 programming problems written in 27 different languages, while carefully monitoring how much electricity each one used — as well as its speed and memory usage.
  • How Java EE found new life as Jakarta EE
    The title of this post may seem strange, but if you look a bit into Java EE's recent history, it will make sense. Originally, Sun started and ran Java Enterprise Edition, and later Oracle took over after it acquired Sun. Specifications were driven by a Sun/Oracle-governed process. At more or less regular intervals, they made a new version of the specification available, which was implemented by the server vendors. Those vendors had to license the technology compatibility kits (TCKs) and brand from Oracle. Let's fast-forward a bit. In 2013, Java EE 7 was released, and Oracle began work on EE8, but it did not progress quickly. Meanwhile, new technologies like Docker and Kubernetes came along and changed the way applications run. Instead of running a single fat server process on a big machine, the software is now split into smaller, independent services that run in a (usually) Docker container orchestrated by Kubernetes.