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Tuesday, 17 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Japan KDE Users Group Interview

Filed under
KDE
Interviews

dot.kde.org: Despite their prominent position in the world as leaders of technology, we hear from oriental countries quite rarely in the free software world. To find out what happens to KDE in the East, we asked some questions to Daisuke Kameda (亀田 大輔) of the KDE Japan Users Group.

ARMLinux-based diskless notebook costs under $300

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

A British Columbia-based startup called InkMedia announced an under-$300 notebook that runs embedded Linux. Based on a Freescale i.MX31 processor, the Ink Mobile Computer (Ink MC) depends entirely on flash-based storage and offers an 8.6-inch SVGA display, four USB slots, Ethernet, and WiFi.

Give Me 3 Synths

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: In my next three articles I'll profile three native Linux software synthesizers (a.k.a. softsynths). I'll introduce their basic synthesis architectures and program operations, then I'll guide my readers briefly through the process of creating a new sound for each synth profiled. Our voyage begins with Nick Dowell's Analogue Modeling SYNTHesizer, better known as amSynth.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Power Management on Linux, Part 2

  • Copying Damaged Disks (CD and DVD) in PCLinuxOS
  • Create MySQL User Accounts from the Command Line
  • Listen audio player: webradio, lyrics, podcast and last.fm all at once
  • Fun With Rsync - Part I
  • How to Install Fonts in Ubuntu 8.04
  • Broadcast your music with Icecast
  • Tips & Tricks: Getting the Mplayer Mozilla Plugin Working
  • 10 common mistakes to avoid when you’re installing Linux software

Newsflash: Grannies Need Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Chances are, Granny's computer hardware is fine. Since Linux will run on anything from a toaster oven to a space station -- unless there's actual physical damage, the upgrade to Linux should cost nothing but some of your time. Here's a quick list of suggestions to make life easier on you both:

Reiser a Victim of 'One of the Great Screw Jobs,' Lawyer Says

Filed under
Reiser

blog.wired.com: Linux programmer Hans Reiser is the victim of police "shading" and "one of the great screw jobs" perpetrated by his wife, who the open source developer is accused of killing, his attorney, William DuBois, told jurors during his second day of closing arguments here.

Mac Clone Maker Psystar Also Offers Ubuntu, XP, And Vista

Filed under
Ubuntu

informationweek.com/blog: A Miami-based system integrator that's selling an unauthorized Mac clone also is offering the open source Ubuntu Linux desktop as an option on the system, as well as Windows XP and Windows Vista.

Win the desktop, and you will win the server

Filed under
Linux

Tristan Rhodes: Red Hat has recently announced that they have "No plans for a traditional consumer desktop". Let me explain why I think Red Hat needs to change their business strategy.

Customizing Your Ubuntu Experience

Filed under
Ubuntu

foogazi.com: After a Ubuntu install one of the first things that users want to do is customize the look to their liking. Lynucs.org has a great collection of screen shots to provide some inspiration for this process. This article is meant to get you going in the right direction as far as customizing the look and feel of Ubuntu.

Sweeping Changes in New Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: The kernel at the center of the burgeoning Linux universe has just received its broadest series of changes in its history. The new 2.6.25 kernel's extensive list of enhancements continues Linux's forward momentum, as it enjoys escalating success both in terms of developers and in customer spending.

New Inkscape 0.46 is good news

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Version 0.46 of the open source vector graphics editor Inkscape is out, showcasing new tools, new effects, new filters, and a host of interface and speed improvements.

Open-source Flash rival "Gnashes" out

Filed under
Software

linuxdevices.com: A non-profit open source project with high-profile backers has released beta code for an open source Flash media player, with a media server in the wings. Open Media Now's Gnash player runs standalone or as a plugin, and may run better than Flash on constrained devices.

New Debian leader aims for better communication

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: In many ways the Debian GNU/Linux project is unique among all the distributions that dot the Linux landscape. Apart from putting out a high-grade distribution, it has served as the base for a number of others - Ubuntu and Knoppix, to name just two - which have had a big impact on the growth of the Linux ecosystem.

Microsoft Vista vs. Linux desktops: An IT pro sounds off

Filed under
OS

blogs.techtarget.com: The thought of moving to Microsoft Vista has put many Windows users into a panic, writes Ubuntu Linux user and IT pro Fred Marsico. In trade mags and blogs, have read about the Vista-versus-Linux issue, and it’s now my turn to say something.

Top 5 Potential YouTube Killers

Filed under
Web

junauza.com: YouTube is without doubt the most popular video sharing website on the planet with daily page views of around 100,000,000. At the moment, there are plenty of video sharing sites that are striving to take YouTube down.

Did Sun just make mySQL closed source?

Filed under
Software

blogs.zdnet.com: Sun’s happy talk at its mySQL shindig this week masked a grimmer reality. In the future cool new features of mySQL (like online backup) will, when written by Sun, first go only to paying customers.

Alternative web servers compared: Lighttpd, Nginx, LiteSpeed and Zeus

Filed under
Software

royal.pingdom.com: In this article we present four popular alternative web servers: Lighttpd, Nginx, LiteSpeed and Zeus. The first two are free and open source while the other two are commercial, closed-source alternatives. What they all have in common is that they focus on high performance.

Compiz Fusion Community News for April 17, 2008

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: Highlights for this entry are The new and wonderful Cube Cylinder deformation, More and More improvements to Freely Transformable Windows with a good roadmap ahead of us, The beginnings of a Compiz Fusion Live CD and the springy and fun Dodge Window plugin.

Things I Can’t Do In Ubuntu…yet

Filed under
Ubuntu

meandubuntu.wordpress: Although I’ve been using Ubuntu every day, reading websites and magazines, and even listening to podcasts, there are a few things that have eluded me. I’ve resolved to work on at least one a little bit every day, and hope I make a breakthrough.

Shuttleworth starts countdown to Ubuntu 8.04 release

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: The next red-letter day for Ubuntu fans will be April 24, when Ubuntu 8.04 LTS (Long Term Support) arrives. Mark Shuttleworth, the CEO of Canonical, the company behind Ubuntu, guarantees that the next version of the popular Linux distribution will make it on time, with something for enterprise, desktop, and Internet users.

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More in Tux Machines

Security: WPA2, CVE-2017-15265, Fuzzing, Hyperledger

  • Fedora Dev Teaches Users How to Protect Their Wi-Fi Against WPA2 KRACK Bug
    Former Fedora Project leader Paul W. Frields talks today about how to protect your Fedora computers from the dangerous WPA2 KRACK security vulnerability that affects virtually any device using the security protocol to connect to the Internet.
  • WPA2 was kracked because it was based on a closed standard that you needed to pay to read
    How did a bug like krack fester in WPA2, the 13-year-old wifi standard whose flaws have rendered hundreds of millions of devices insecure, some of them permanently so? Thank the IEEE's business model. The IEEE is the standards body that developed WPA2, and they fund their operations by charging hundreds of dollars to review the WPA2 standard, and hundreds more for each of the standards it builds upon, so that would-be auditors of the protocol have to shell out thousands just to start looking. It's an issue that Carl Mamamud, Public Resource and the Electronic Frontier Foundation have been fighting hard on for years, ensuring that the standards that undergird public safety and vital infrastructure are available for anyone to review, audit and criticize.
  • Patch Available for Linux Kernel Privilege Escalation
    The issue — tracked as CVE-2017-15265 — is a use-after-free memory corruption issue that affects ALSA (Advanced Linux Sound Architecture), a software framework included in the Linux kernel that provides an API for sound card drivers.
  • ​Linus Torvalds says targeted fuzzing is improving Linux security
    Announcing the fifth release candidate for the Linux kernel version 4.14, Linus Torvalds has revealed that fuzzing is producing a steady stream of security fixes. Fuzzing involves stress testing a system by generating random code to induce errors, which in turn may help identify potential security flaws. Fuzzing is helping software developers catch bugs before shipping software to users.
  • Devsecops: Add security to complete your devops process [Ed: more silly buzzwords]
  • Companies overlook risks in open source software [Ed: marketing disguised as "news" (and which is actually FUD)]
  • Q&A: Does blockchain alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?
    According to some, blockchain is one of the hottest and most intriguing technologies currently in the market. Similar to the rising of the internet, blockchain could potentially disrupt multiple industries, including financial services. This Thursday, October 19 at Sibos in Toronto, Hyperledger’s Security Maven Dave Huseby will be moderating a panel “Does Blockchain technology alleviate security concerns or create new challenges?” During this session, experts will explore whether the shared nature of blockchain helps or hinders security.

Games: Nowhere Prophet, Ebony Spire: Heresy, The First Tree, Daggerfall, Talos Principle

  • Nowhere Prophet, a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles has Linux support
    Nowhere Prophet [Official Site, itch.io], a single-player tactical roguelike with card-based battles is currently going through 'First Access' (itch's version of Early Access) and it has Linux support.
  • Ebony Spire: Heresy, a first-person turn-based dungeon crawler will release next month
    For fans of the classic first-person dungeon crawlers, Ebony Spire: Heresy [Steam] looks like it might scratch the itch. One interesting thing to note, is that Linux is the primary platform for the development of the game. It's really great to hear about more games actually developed on Linux! Even better, is that the source code for the game is under the MIT license. You can find the source on GitHub. The source is currently a little outdated, but the developer has told me that it will be updated when the Beta becomes available.
  • The First Tree, a short and powerful exploration game is now available on Linux
    The developer of The First Tree [itch.io, Steam, Official Site] email in to let everyone know that their beautiful 3rd-person exploration game is now on Linux 'due to a ton of requests'. Linux support arrived as part of a major patch, which improves gamepad support, adds an option to invert the Y-axis and Camera Sensitivity options are in too. On top of that, a bunch of bugs were also squashed.
  • The open source recreation of Daggerfall hits an important milestone
    Another classic game is getting closer to being fully playable natively on Linux. The project to recreate The Elder Scrolls II: Daggerfall in the Unity engine has hit an important milestone and now the the main quest is completely playable. Daggerfall is the second entry in Bethesda’s long-running Elder Scrolls series of role-playing games and was originally released way back in 1996. It was an ambitious game, with thousands upon thousands of locations to explore in an virtual game area the size of a small real-world nation. It’s a game that I personally lost a lot of time to way back in the day and I’m happy to see that a project that allows me to play it natively on Linux is coming along swimmingly.
  • The Talos Principle VR Launches With Linux Support
    Croteam has just released The Talos Principle VR, the virtual reality edition of their award-winning The Talos Principle puzzle game. SteamOS/Linux with the HTC Vive is supported alongside Windows. This VR-enhanced version of The Talos Principle is retailing for $39.99 USD.

Android Leftovers

Review: Google Pixel 2

If I had to pick the moment I most appreciated the Google Pixel 2, it would be when our airboat driver-slash-tour guide put a hot dog and a piece of raw chicken in his pocket, dove into the New Orleans swamp, and began playing with a giant gator named Who Dat. I’m no social media whiz, but I knew there was Instagram gold unfolding in front of me. So I pulled out my Pixel 2 XL, the larger of Google’s two new models, double-clicked on the power button to open the camera, and started snapping. Read more