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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 26 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 7:22am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 7:15am
Story Multi-Core Scaling Performance Of AMD's Bulldozer srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 4:54am
Story Introduction to The GIMP srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 4:53am
Story Ubuntu 11.10 review srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 4:50am
Story White Screen of Death srlinuxx 1 27/10/2011 - 1:32am
Story Firefox partners with The Evil Empire srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 12:29am
Story Adobe Flash 11.2 Beta Brings New Linux Work srlinuxx 27/10/2011 - 12:28am
Story GPL or BSD License: Confusion Galore srlinuxx 26/10/2011 - 10:39pm
Story Some Wallpapers srlinuxx 26/10/2011 - 10:38pm

Rexx and what it means for AIX

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Nearly thirty years of growth haven't exhausted the potential of the REstructured eXtended eXecutor (Rexx) language. The first of the widely used "scripting" languages continues to expand its capabilities and platform range, and it makes for a particularly good match with AIX.

Ubuntu Feisty beta delayed

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The beta release of Ubuntu Feisty, the latest release of the popular Linux operating system, has been delayed for a day because of kernel issues.

In an email to the Ubuntu developers list early this morning Tollef Fog Heen wrote: "The beta release [of Feisty] is delayed until Friday due to a kernel regression which caused problems booting quite a large number of systems.


Do-it-all CMS Drupal

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I've been on the hunt for a good open source content management system (CMS) – something that is both easy to set up and use, and yet offers good customisation. I don't want my site to look like every other blog in the world.

Jono Bacon: Making us win - Integrating open content

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One of the most notable changes in Feisty that I have been looking forward to is the updated Rhythmbox with its Jamendo and Magantune support.

The Secret Life of Embedded Linux

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Consumers and enterprise workers will not likely soon see cute marketing labels such as "Linux Inside" or images of penguins pasted on the outer casings of their favorite entertainment and communications products. Nor will products they buy be touted as using Linux in advertising campaigns.

Virtual Users And Domains With Postfix, Courier And MySQL (Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft)

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This document describes how to install a Postfix mail server that is based on virtual users and domains, i.e. users and domains that are in a MySQL database. I'll also demonstrate the installation and configuration of Courier (Courier-POP3, Courier-IMAP), so that Courier can authenticate against the same MySQL database Postfix uses.

Novell: Will Thin Desktops Equal Fat Profits?

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Novell is quietly launching a thin client offensive with Wyse Technology. Although I have criticized many of Novell's recent moves, this thin client approach is super smart.

Oracle claims Yahoo has defected

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Ellison claimed that Yahoo, which was previously a client for Red Hat, has now decided to buy Oracle's Red Hat clone and service package instead. This is news for Red Hat and Yahoo.

While it has bought Oracle Linux, Yahoo has said it will continue to buy Red Hat products and Red Hat says it will continue to supply them.

It seems that Larry has jumped the gun a bit with his enthusiasm.

Software RAID5 and LVM with the Etch Installer

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Our team at LinuxForce recently put together a Debian server with LVM on a software RAID5 volume. This has been possible through complex installation procedures in the past, but today the Debian Etch installer is capable of handling such an installation if you follow the proper steps, which I outline in this article.

Configuring Dynamic DNS & DHCP on Debian Stable

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For the average home computer user there is no need to install a complex package such as the Internet Software Consortium's BIND DNS or DHCP server, since there are far simpler lower resource tools to use, for example dnsmasq.

Microsoft tips for pitching to Linux geeks

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Sometimes something appears that makes you scratch your head so much that you fear that you may inflict a self-imposed scalping, such was the dandruff clearing delusion caused by this site:

Chess engines for Linux

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A chess engine is the actual program against which you play the game. A chess engine can take a move as an input, and after analysis, generate a move of its own as an output. Chess engines for Linux are comparable in strength to commercial chess engines available for other platforms. Here's a look at the features of half a dozen of the most well-known chess engines for Linux.

We Want Linux to Win: Q&A with Novell CEO, Ron Hovsepian

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Novell's annual user event, BrainShare, took place this week in Salt Lake City, Utah. President and CEO, Ron Hovsepian sat down with Linux Magazine's Bryan Richard to talk about patent protection, responding to customers, and competing with Red Hat.

fedora over ubuntu

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One of my tasks this week was to setup a web server for some sites currently hosted on the tragedy of the grid.

Review: HDR on Linux with Qtpfsgui

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Editing HDR images on Linux is not so easy: the current situation of HDR image editing on Linux is so so. Especially tone mapping is possible, but not easy: the libraries are available, but there was no GUI, let alone an easy to use and user friendly GUI

Towards a complete Free Software market

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Let's break this thick glass once and for all. Patching free operating systems like GNU/Linux with proprietary pieces where Free Software is not mandatory for world domination. And it sure is not mandatory for basic functioning of the system anymore either, so you can't exactly use the "RMS used proprietary UNIX to build GNU" argument anymore. We have the complete Free OS. We have three of them.

SabayonLinux 3.3

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We have been a fan of SabayonLinux for quite some time, so we could not pass up a chance to tinker with their heavily anticipated new version. In addition to updated software, 3.3 brings about a new color scheme. It's also touted as being more stable, so let's put it to the test.

Mozilla fixes Firefox flaws it introduced

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Mozilla Corp. late yesterday updated the Firefox browser to patch a single security vulnerability and fix several bugs it unintentionally introduced in earlier versions.

Mozilla currently supports two branches of the open-source application, and the upgrades -- Firefox and Firefox -- are now available, according to the release notes posted on the company's Web site.

Case study: Penguin-flavoured poultry

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Perhaps administrators of other Unix systems would be easier to convert to the almost identical Linux offering. Indeed, the cost advantage when comparing Windows Server to Linux Server solutions is literally the price of the Microsoft code, since both run on identical hardware.

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More in Tux Machines


  • New features in GNOME To Do
    Some of you might have noticed that GNOME To Do wasn’t released with GNOME 3.22. There is a reason for that: I didn’t have enough time to add new features, or fix any bugs. But that changed, and in fact big things happened.
  • CUDA 8, cuDNN, Nvidia drivers and GNOME Software metadata
    The Nvidia driver repository has been updated with AppStream metadata. From Fedora 25 onward, you will be able to search for Nvidia, CUDA, GeForce or Quadro to make the driver, control panel and other programs appear in the Gnome Software window. As far as I know, this should be enabled by default on Fedora 25.
  • Builder Rust
    With Federico’s wonderful post on Rust’ifying librsvg I guess it makes sense to share what I’ve been doing the last couple of days. I’ve been keeping my eye on Rust for quite a while. However, I’ve been so heads down with Builder the last two years that I haven’t really gotten to write any or help on integration into our platform. Rust appears to take a very pragmatic stance on integration with systems code (which is primarily C). The C calling convention is not going anywhere, so at some point, you will be integrating with some part of a system that is “C-like”. Allowing us to piecemeal upgrade the “Safety” of our systems is much smarter than rewrite-the-universe. This pragmatism is likely due to the realities of Rust’s birth at Mozilla. It’s a huge code-base, and incrementally modernizing it is the only reality that is approachable.
  • Librsvg gets Rusty
    I've been wanting to learn Rust for some time. It has frustrated me for a number of years that it is quite possible to write GNOME applications in high-level languages, but for the libraries that everything else uses ("the GNOME platform"), we are pretty much stuck with C. Vala is a very nice effort, but to me it never seemed to catch much momentum outside of GNOME. After reading this presentation called "Rust out your C", I got excited. It *is* possible to port C code to Rust, small bits at a time! You rewrite some functions in Rust, make them linkable to the C code, and keep calling them from C as usual. The contortions you need to do to make C types accessible from Rust are no worse than for any other language.

Leftovers: Software

  • Rblpapi 0.3.5
    A new release of Rblpapi is now on CRAN. Rblpapi provides a direct interface between R and the Bloomberg Terminal via the C++ API provided by Bloomberg Labs (but note that a valid Bloomberg license and installation is required).
  • Flatpak 0.6.13
    These used to take an application id and an optional branch name as two arguments. This meant you could not specify multiple apps to install in a single command. So, instead of having the branch as a separate argument we now support partial references. If you only specify an id we try to match the rest as best we can depending on what is installed/available, but if this matches multiple things you have to specify more details.
  • New features on Hosted Weblate
    Today, new version has been deployed on Hosted Weblate. It brings many long requested features and enhancements.
  • A Wild Desktop Reddit App for Linux Appears
    Reddit is …Well it’s Reddit: there’s little else like it on the internet. Thos of us who use Reddit probably do so a tab, in a browser, because that’s how the site works best. Many desktop Reddit apps exist, but few translate the unique experience of using the service to the desktop in a way that really works.
  • Opera 41 Browser Brings Performance Improvements
    For those still using the Opera web-browser, Opera 41 is now available as the latest stable release and seems primarily focused on performance improvements.
  • Faster and better browsing – Welcome Opera 41
    We all know the feeling. You want to check out your favorite website, but when you open your laptop or turn on your computer, you realize the browser is closed. You click on the browser icon and then have to wait while the browser opens all your previously opened sites… We have a solution for you that makes your browsing faster: Opera 41 includes a new, smarter startup sequence that cuts away almost all the wait time, no matter how many tabs you open on startup.

today's howtos

Security News

  • Tuesday's security updates
  • We Got Phished
    She logged into her account but couldn’t find the document and, with other more urgent emails to deal with, she quickly moved on and put this brief event out of mind. This staff member will henceforth be known as PZ, or “patient zero.” The login page wasn’t really a login page. It was a decoy webpage, designed to look legitimate in order to trick unsuspecting recipients into typing in their private login credentials. Having fallen for the ruse, PZ had effectively handed over her email username and password to an unknown party outside the Exploratorium. This type of attack is known as “phishing.” Much like putting a lure into a lake and waiting to see what bites, a phishing attack puts out phony prompts, such as a fake login page, hoping that unwitting recipients can be manipulated into giving up personal information.
  • DDoS attacks against Dyn the work of 'script kiddies'
    Last week's distributed denial of service attack in the US against domain name services provider Dynamic Network Services are more likely to have been the work of "script kiddies", and not state actors. Security researchers at threat intelligence firm Flashpoint dismissed reports that linked the attack to WikiLeaks, the Russian government or the New World Hackers group. Instead, Flashpoint said, it was "moderately confident" that the Hackforums community was behind the attack which led to well-known sites like Twitter, Spotify, Netflix and Paypal being inaccessible on 21 October (US time).
  • How one rent-a-botnet army of cameras, DVRs caused Internet chaos
    Welcome to the Internet of Evil Things. The attack that disrupted much of the Internet on October 21 is still being teased apart by investigators, but evidence thus far points to multiple "botnets" of Internet-connected gadgets being responsible for blocking access to the Domain Name Service (DNS) infrastructure at DNS provider Dyn. Most of these botnets—coordinated armies of compromised devices that sent malicious network traffic to their targets—were controlled by Mirai, a self-spreading malware for Internet of Things (IoT) devices. in a blog post on the attack, Dyn reported "tens of millions" of devices were involved in the attack But other systems not matching the signature of Mirai were also involved in the coordinated attack on Dyn. "We believe that there might be one or more additional botnets involved in these attacks," Dale Drew, CSO of Level 3 Communications, told Ars. "This could mean that they are 'renting' several different botnets to launch an attack against a specific victim, in which multiple other sites have been impacted." The motive may have been blackmail, since the attacker sought a payout by Dyn to stop. But Drew warned that the huge disruption caused by the attack "could result in large copycat attacks, and [a] higher [number of] victim payouts [so] as to not be impacted in the same way. It could also be a signal that the bad guy is using multiple botnets in order to better avoid detection since they are not orchestrating the attack from a single botnet source."
  • ARM builds up security in the tiniest Internet of Things chips
    IoT is making devices smaller, smarter, and – we hope – safer. It’s not easy to make all those things happen at once, but chips that can help are starting to emerge. On Tuesday at ARM TechCon in Silicon Valley, ARM will introduce processors that are just a fraction of a millimeter across and incorporate the company’s TrustZone technology. TrustZone is hardware-based security built into SoC (system on chip) processors to establish a root of trust. It’s designed to prevent devices from being hacked and taken over by intruders, a danger that’s been in the news since the discovery of the Mirai botnet, which recently took over thousands of IP cameras to mount denial-of-service attacks.
  • Antique Kernel Flaw Opens Door to New Dirty Cow Exploit