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Thursday, 30 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

80% on Novell

Filed under
SUSE

matt asay: OK, so sometimes I'm wrong. Miguel de Icaza called out an error I made in criticizing Novell for its open-source strategy. I admit that I find it hard to see beyond Novell's patent pact with Microsoft but, as Miguel pointed out in a string of emails between us today, this leaves out a lot that Novell does well.

Vector Linux 5.8 on 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: In a lot of the same ways I liked Wolvix, I like Vector Linux. On the other hand, there’s enough that’s different that I probably won’t keep it. Part of that might be a sophomore slump having just seen Wolvix in action: It’s a hard act to follow.

2.4.36-pre1, Preventing NULL Dereferences

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "In private discussions, Solar Designer proposed to restrict the ability to map the NULL address to CAP_RAW_IO capable processes only. The idea behind this was to prevent 'normal' users from trying to exploit NULL dereferences in the kernel which have not been discovered yet."

Paterva Evolution is dead, long live Maltego

Filed under
Software

linux.com: As noted in the update to our review of Paterva Evolution, a personal data mining tool, Roelof Temmingh has removed the binaries for the application after having received legal threats over its use. In an email on the Paterva announcement's mailing list over the weekend, Temmingh revealed more about why the binaries had to be removed and unveiled his plans for future work on the project.

Chuck Norris Week on Ubuntu Forums

Filed under
Ubuntu

Motho ke motho ka botho: For the next week, most (if not all) of the UF.org staff have transmogrified into miniature renditions of everyone’s favorite superhuman being, Chuck Norris.

Sabayon: miniEditions, Portage (the good) and Entropy (the hard work), Sponsorship (the fun)

Filed under
Linux

planet.sabayonlinux: Ok, miniEditions are on the way. I’m working on them since Friday (eventually!). They won’t support Equo yet, since I am actively working on something. I’m just trying the latest unstable release [of portage] and the first impression is: “eventually something good!”.

Linux users receive local support boost

Filed under
Linux

arabianbusiness: Regional Linux users received a boost today as open source leader Red Hat announced the opening of a regional support centre for the Middle East.

Microsoft announces Linux-powered WiFi bus route for employees

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica: In a positive effort to ease the commute of its employees, Microsoft has announced a new bus route that will reach to various local regions. Set to begin later this month, a total of five routes will stretch to Seattle, Issaquah, Mill Creek, Sammammish, and Bothell.

some shorts

Filed under
News
  • Linus says: “C++ is a horrible language”

  • Microsoft's browser market share drops 9.5 percent in a year
  • Shaping up the time for KDE.
  • OpenLierox

NVIDIA: Got Specifications?

Filed under
Software

phoronix: This past week AMD raised the Linux graphics bar by not only announcing their new fglrx graphics driver, which delivers Radeon HD 2000 support, immense performance improvements, and AIGLX, but it was accompanied by an announcement that they will be delivering specifications to the X.Org development community. One of the common questions that has since come up is what will NVIDIA do in response.

PC-BSD Day 5: BSD Certification

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: The fresh install of PC-BSD was a very simple task. There was no need to make backups of important files and under Vmware the creation of new virtual computer is simply a matter of following the step in the wizard. I decided not to use disk 2 to install for instance Firefox or OpenOffice.org, but just to install the basic system that disk 1 provides. That didn’t take long.

Lenovo opening the door for Ubuntu ThinkPads?

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Lenovo finally started shipping SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop on its T-Series ThinkPads for its mainstream business users. Now, the company appears to be considering offering another Linux, very possibly Ubuntu, for the enthusiast market.

some howtos and such

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to Find Commands in Your Bash History

  • Installing MPlayer on openSUSE 10.1
  • Google Calendar & Gnome
  • removing garbage characters from screen terminal

Breathe easily: protect your Linux box with Snort

Filed under
HowTos

iTWire: An intrusion detection system – or IDS – is a high-tech burglar alarm, keeping a watchful eye on your computer and alerting when computer or network activity indicates unauthorised or malicious activity. An IDS is a must-have app, and Snort is rapidly becoming the tool of choice.

Comparing Debian and Fedora

Filed under
Linux

etbe.coker.com.au: A common question is how to compare Fedora [1] and Debian [2] in terms of recent updates and support. I think that Fedora Rawhide and Debian/Unstable are fairly equivalent in this regard, new upstream releases get packaged quickly, and support is minimal.

“Goobuntu” must be more than a Google-branded Ubuntu.

Filed under
Linux

writelarge.com: The other barier to GoogleOS, at least for me, is the GOOGLE IS WATCHING YOU factor. I fear Google. I don’t feel like Google is as honest as I’d like them to be. Would Goobuntu be nothing more than a widgeted up install of Ubuntu that spies on you?

Mandriva Linux 2008.0 RC1 Screenshots

Filed under
MDV

phoronix: The first release candidate for Copernic, or perhaps better known as the codename for Mandriva Linux 2008, has been released. Mandriva Linux 2008 includes GNOME 2.20, the Linux 2.6.22 kernel, Compiz Fusion, and XDG menu migration and XDG user directory system.

Wolvix 1.1.0 on 450Mhz K6-2, 256Mb

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress.com: Part of my motivation in jumping around so much is to sniff out the general state of other XFCE distributions, in case I’m driven by a wild urge to ditch Xubuntu altogether, and move in a different direction.

RISC OS-on-Linux project prepares live CD

Filed under
OS

drobe.co.uk: An ambitious initiative to eventually run RISC OS desktop software on Linux-powered PCs took a step closer to reality this month. Issues with the user interface code have been addressed, and a bootable CD is being prepared to demonstrate the system's abilities.

Adventures in Linux go forth

Filed under
Linux

nashuatelegraph.com: So, we’ve installed Linux on an older Celeron laptop in an effort to breathe new life into the old boy. Here are our recommendations for Window users who, like us, are Linux newbies:

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More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Thursday
  • Security Tips for Installing Linux on Your SysAdmin Workstation
    Once you’ve chosen a Linux distro that meets all the security guidelines set out in our last article, you’ll need to install the distro on your workstation.
  • Fedora 26 crypto policy Test Day today (2017-03-30)!
  • Open-source developers targeted in sophisticated malware attack
    For the past few months, developers who publish their code on GitHub have been targeted in an attack campaign that uses a little-known but potent cyberespionage malware. The attacks started in January and consisted of malicious emails specifically crafted to attract the attention of developers, such as requests for help with development projects and offers of payment for custom programming jobs. The emails had .gz attachments that contained Word documents with malicious macro code attached. If allowed to execute, the macro code executed a PowerShell script that reached out to a remote server and downloaded a malware program known as Dimnie.
  • A scramble at Cisco exposes uncomfortable truths about U.S. cyber defense
    When WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange disclosed earlier this month that his anti-secrecy group had obtained CIA tools for hacking into technology products made by U.S. companies, security engineers at Cisco Systems (CSCO.O) swung into action. The Wikileaks documents described how the Central Intelligence Agency had learned more than a year ago how to exploit flaws in Cisco's widely used Internet switches, which direct electronic traffic, to enable eavesdropping. Senior Cisco managers immediately reassigned staff from other projects to figure out how the CIA hacking tricks worked, so they could help customers patch their systems and prevent criminal hackers or spies from using the same methods, three employees told Reuters on condition of anonymity.
  • NTPsec: a Secure, Hardened NTP Implementation
    Network time synchronization—aligning your computer's clock to the same Universal Coordinated Time (UTC) that everyone else is using—is both necessary and a hard problem. Many internet protocols rely on being able to exchange UTC timestamps accurate to small tolerances, but the clock crystal in your computer drifts (its frequency varies by temperature), so it needs occasional adjustments. That's where life gets complicated. Sure, you can get another computer to tell you what time it thinks it is, but if you don't know how long that packet took to get to you, the report isn't very useful. On top of that, its clock might be broken—or lying. To get anywhere, you need to exchange packets with several computers that allow you to compare your notion of UTC with theirs, estimate network delays, apply statistical cluster analysis to the resulting inputs to get a plausible approximation of real UTC, and then adjust your local clock to it. Generally speaking, you can get sustained accuracy to on the close order of 10 milliseconds this way, although asymmetrical routing delays can make it much worse if you're in a bad neighborhood of the internet.
  • Zelda Coatings
    I assume that every permutation of scams will eventually be tried; it is interesting that the initial ones preyed on people's avarice and dishonesty: "I will transfer millions to your bank account, then you share with me" - with subsequent scams appealing to another demographic: "I want to donate a large sum to your religious charity" - to perhaps capture a more virtuous but still credulous lot. Where will it end ?

Tizen and Android

Linux and Linux Foundation

Mesa and Intel Graphics