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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 28 May 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Intel Ivy Bridge Linux Performance Stepped Up In 2013 Roy Schestowitz 06/01/2014 - 12:00am
Story Parted Magic Continues Being Commercial-Only Rianne Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 7:56pm
Story It Looks Like Ubuntu's First Phone Might Be For China Rianne Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 7:50pm
Story The 10 Best Features Of FreeBSD 10.0 Rianne Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 7:44pm
Story 7 Surprises At Red Hat Partner Conference 2014 Rianne Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 6:07pm
Story PC-BSD 10.0 RC3 Improves Hybrid Graphics Support Rianne Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 4:58pm
Story Glade 3.16.1 UI Designer Repairs Numerous Bugs Rianne Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 4:51pm
Story Linux 3.13-rc7 announced Rianne Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 4:46pm
Story OggCamp 2013 – Free software, free culture & mass surveillance Rianne Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 4:43pm
Story 30 Cool Open Source Software I Discovered in 2013 Roy Schestowitz 05/01/2014 - 2:11pm

The Road to Ubuntu - Backup Salvation

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: After several weeks of anguish I've finally recreated my Windows XP file backup regime under Gutsy Gibbon, overcoming my fear of the Linux command line in the process.

Review: openSuSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

anurag.acespace.co.uk: Although I wasn't the first one to download the latest version of openSuSE, I was still one of the first to do so, believe me. SuSE was the first Linux distribution that I used to fix my roots in the Linux world. So, I've an attachment with this flavor of Linux in particular. But I won't be partial in this review, not even a bit. I'll present my review on Novell's openSuSE 10.3 in an easy-to-understand manner, that is, topic-wise:

Linux desktop lacks innovation

Filed under
Linux

the inquirer: Microsoft is complaining that "the Linux desktop including OpenOffice" infringes some 235 Microsoft patents. An objective comparison between the whole Linux desktop and Microsoft's Windows desktop shows that it has a good point; there are many resemblances, from trivial to profound.

The truth about the linux desktop market share

Filed under
Linux

technocrat.net: Duke Nukem Forever and Linux on the desktop... To understand the markets you have to know something about magicians, and how they work.

ATI Open vs. Closed-Source Performance

Filed under
Software

phoronix: This past Friday we had delivered benchmarks comparing the performance of the open-source Radeon driver against the new closed-source fglrx driver from AMD. In addition to these Compiz benchmarks, on the same system we had also ran some additional benchmarks to see for gaming and 2D rendering how the two ATI Linux drivers compare.

DesktopBSD Day 4 - Software Management Snags

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: Let’s continue with software management. I expected to wake up with a completely updated system, ready to receive further instructions in order to become a fully usable open source desktop. What I got was a system that had halted at 75%. Various updates hadn’t finished successfully. Today I spend most of my time playing with that.

Zenwalk 4.8 Review

Filed under
Linux

I am just in love with xfce based distributions; they are fast, simple and elegant and Zenwalk is no exception. It has a really good control center and out-of-box multimedia support. Except for few initial hick-ups (network card module) it is really user friendly. I would recommend it to new Linux users.

Don't complain. Do something useful instead.

Life throws us curve balls, but how we react or respond to a given situation is what really matters.

The year of the Linux desktop has finally arrived

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: While Windows advocates may smirk and say here we go again, as 2007 draws to a close I get the strong feeling that we may look back upon this year and recognize it with hindsight as the year that the Linux desktop finally arrived. There are a number of events that point to 2007 as being the turning point for Linux.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • MP3s On Ubuntu - The OGG Alternative

  • how to create animate gif from your mobile video
  • Short Tip: Extract Files from an RPM file
  • Howto Setup firefox for kmail

An interview with matthew

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

kmandla.wordpress: The management of the Ubuntuforums includes a Forums Council, which was established in the past year as a way of integrating the forum community into the greater Ubuntu framework. The council is presently made up of forum administrators; matthew — a writer, guitarist and father — is one of them.

How to dual-boot Vista with Linux (Adding Linux on Vista machine)

Filed under
HowTos

blorge.com: If you want to explore and enjoy both Vista and Linux world in a single PC, then you have to configure your PC to handle dual-boot system. It may sound difficult but it’s really within the knowledge of average computer users. Here are the steps to add Linux on your Vista system for a dual boot.

Also: GSoC: final look at Bootloader Manager

Torus-trooper: a shoot-’em-up in a tunnel

Filed under
Software
Gaming

DPotD: Torus-trooper is a pretty nice abstract shoot-’em-up taking place in what could be called a space tunnel. You drive some kind of ship or car who has to stay on the sides of the tunnel, and shoot bad enemies.

Also: Read Comic Books with Jomic

Installing Songbird 0.3 Developer Pre-Release On Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon)

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

This guide shows how to install the Songbird media player (0.3 Developer Pre-Release) on an Ubuntu 7.10 (Gutsy Gibbon) desktop. Songbird is a free software audio player with media database capabilities written using XUL and VLC, with an interface similar to Apple's iTunes.

Determining the Value of Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

opensource.sys-con.com: Open source technology is a boon to companies that want to add features and functionality to their applications without the overhead. It eliminates the cost of databases, operating systems, and other infrastructure components, enabling quick and cost-effective access to new features.

Cheap Linux PCs may pressure One Laptop Per Child

Filed under
Linux

networkworld.com: As component prices drop, the aggressive pricing of commercial Linux notebooks could hamper efforts by One Laptop Per Child to supply inexpensive laptops to children in developing markets.

Also: Eee Pc impressions

Google to unveil 'Android' phone software

Filed under
Linux
Google

c|net: Google is ready to unveil a suite of software for mobile phones based on open-source technology, backed by some of the largest wireless industry companies in the world.

From a PCLinuxOS user: Kubuntu Gutsy doesn't totally reek.

Filed under
Linux

I'm a confirmed PCLinuxOS and KDE user. But, I've given a brief trial on my test box of Kubuntu Gutsy-X86_64. Aside from the whole sudo vs su issue (I hate sudo), Kubuntu Gutsy doesn't totally reek. Actually it's usable. Either I have changed as a Linux user, or Kubuntu has gotten better.

gOS Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

phoronix: Earlier this week Everex launched the gPC TC2502, which is a sub-$200 PC sold at a major US retailer, but what makes this unique is that it runs the gOS. The gOS (GreenOS) is designed to be a conceptual Google Operating System that is based upon Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon.

Ubuntu 7.10 Gutsy Gibbon Impressions

Filed under
Ubuntu

boldinvestors.com: Hello guys, I finally had some time to play around with the latest release of Ubuntu 7.10 and write down my impressions. Overall I'm really impressed with it. In most cases it has exceeded my expectations.

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More in Tux Machines

Games and Software Leftovers

  • Golem 0.6.0 released for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows
    Golem Project, creator of the first global market for idle computer power today announced it released Golem 0.6.0 for Ubuntu, macOS, and Windows. The team stated that the majority of changes are not directly visible to the user, but there are a few noteworthy modifications.
  • Stardock CEO asking to see interest in Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation on Linux with Vulkan
    Ashes of the Singularity: Escalation [GOG][Steam][Official Site] will come to Linux if Stardock see enough requests for it. The CEO of Stardock has requested to see how much interest there is.
  • Chrome won

    The chart above shows the percentage market share of the 4 major browsers over the last 6 years, across all devices. The data is from StatCounter and you can argue that the data is biased in a bunch of different ways, but at the macro level it's safe to say that Chrome is eating the browser market, and everyone else except Safari is getting obliterated.

  • Mailman 3.1.0 released
    The 3.1.0 release of the Mailman mailing list manager is out. "Two years after the original release of Mailman 3.0, this version contains a huge number of improvements across the entire stack. Many bugs have been fixed and new features added in the Core, Postorius (web u/i), and HyperKitty (archiver). Upgrading from Mailman 2.1 should be better too. We are seeing more production sites adopt Mailman 3, and we've been getting great feedback as these have rolled out. Important: mailman-bundler, our previous recommended way of deploying Mailman 3, has been deprecated. Abhilash Raj is putting the finishing touches on Docker images to deploy everything, and he'll have a further announcement in a week or two." New features include support for Python 3.5 and 3.6, MySQL support, new REST resources and methods, user interface and user experience improvements, and more.
  • Cockpit – Monitor And Administer Linux Servers Via Web Browser
    Cockpit is free, open source Server administration tool that allows you to easily monitor and administrator single or multiple Linux servers via a web browser. It helps the system admins to do simple administration tasks, such as starting containers, administrating storage, configuring network, inspecting logs and so on. Switching between Terminal and Cockpit is no big deal. You can the manage the system’s services either from the Cockpit, or from the host’s Terminal. Say for example, if you started a service in Terminal, you can stop it from the Cockpit. Similarly, if an error occurs in the terminal, it can be seen in the Cockpit journal interface and vice versa. It is capable of monitoring multiple Linux servers at the same time. All you need to do is just add the systems you wanted to monitor, and Cockpit will look after them.
  • Buttercup – A Modern Password Manager for Linux
    Buttercup is a cross-platform, free, and open-source password manager with which you can remotely access any of your accounts using a single master password. It features a modern minimal UI, password imports from 3rd-party apps, and basic merge conflict resolution.
  • FreeFileSync The Best Backup And File Synchronization Tool For All Platforms
    FreeFileSync is an open source free to download and use software that can sync your files easily to another disk while maintaining permissions and other important stuff. It is cross platform so you can use it on any OS without any problem. Let us see how to download and use it in Linux.

today's howtos

GNOME: Mutter, gresg, and GTK

  • Mutter 3.25.2 Has Bug Fixes, Some Performance Work
    Florian Müllner has pushed out an updated Mutter 3.25.2 window manager / compositor release in time for the GNOME 3.25.2 milestone in the road to this September's GNOME 3.26 release. Mutter 3.25.2 has a number of fixes ranging from fixing frame updates in certain scenarios, accessible screen coordinates on X11, some build issues, and more.
  • gresg – an XML resources generator
    For me, create GTK+ custom widgets is a very common task. Using templates for them, too.
  • Free Ideas for UI Frameworks, or How To Achieve Polished UI
    Ever since the original iPhone came out, I’ve had several ideas about how they managed to achieve such fluidity with relatively mediocre hardware. I mean, it was good at the time, but Android still struggles on hardware that makes that look like a 486… It’s absolutely my fault that none of these have been implemented in any open-source framework I’m aware of, so instead of sitting on these ideas and trotting them out at the pub every few months as we reminisce over what could have been, I’m writing about them here. I’m hoping that either someone takes them and runs with them, or that they get thoroughly debunked and I’m made to look like an idiot. The third option is of course that they’re ignored, which I think would be a shame, but given I’ve not managed to get the opportunity to implement them over the last decade, that would hardly be surprising. I feel I should clarify that these aren’t all my ideas, but include a mix of observation of and conjecture about contemporary software. This somewhat follows on from the post I made 6 years ago(!) So let’s begin.

Distro News: Alpine, Devuan, and openSUSE