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About Tux Machines

Thursday, 22 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Excellent e-book Tools Rianne Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 5:27am
Story PC-BSD 10.1 RC2 Now Supports UEFI For Boot & Installation Rianne Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 5:20am
Story Tricks or Tracebacks? Pitivi 0.94 is here Rianne Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 5:16am
Story Elive 2.4.0 Beta Is a Combination of Debian and Enlightenment Rianne Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 2:16am
Story Linux 3.18-rc3 Rianne Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 2:06am
Story Open Source Remote Control lets you pilot just about any drone Rianne Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 2:02am
Story AMD's New GPU Kernel Driver Could Be Too Late For Linux 3.19 Rianne Schestowitz 03/11/2014 - 1:55am
Story Big Data Firm Cloudera Forms Incubation Lab for Open Source Initiatives Roy Schestowitz 02/11/2014 - 9:38pm
Story Android 5.0 Lollipop update for LG G2 to release in early 2015 Rianne Schestowitz 02/11/2014 - 8:52pm
Story Cinnamon 2.4 Roy Schestowitz 02/11/2014 - 8:48pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Run Quicken Personal Finance Management Software

  • Ignore Aliases / Functions When Running A Command
  • For A Parallel World. Case Study n.1: automake variables misuse
  • For A Parallel World. Case Study n.2: misknowing your make rules
  • The Joys of xargs
  • Track your investments with Grism
  • Workflow and switching to Git, part 1: Processes
  • Workflow and switching to Git, part 2: The tools
  • Using Pidgin to Send and Receive Text Messages for Free
  • Recording IRC Chats in Linux with Irssi
  • Automatic backup for sporadically connected clients with Box Backup
  • EVDO and VoIP for remote audio transmission
  • Desktop recording made easy with Byzanz in Ubuntu
  • Splunk on Ubuntu 8.04
  • How to Enable USB Support in Virtualbox
  • Quick fix for Firefox 3 bug with Yahoo Mail
  • Installing VMware Workstation 6.x in Foresight Linux

Could governments effectively subsidize open-source development?

Filed under
OSS

cnet.com: At the Utah Open Source Conference yesterday I presented a dilemma. Briefly, the idea is that as open-source buyers grow comfortable with open source they will stop spending money on open source. This leads to tragedy of the commons-type problems and a difficulty in encouraging the creation of more open source.

Netbooks free with cellular contract?

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevices.com: LG Electronics announced a netbook that sports a built-in HSPA (high speed packet access) modem, and may be available from carriers in subsidized form. The X110 has a 1.6GHz Atom processor, 10-inch screen, 80GB or 120GB hard drive, 802.11b/g, and a wired Ethernet port.

Reiser sentenced to 15 years-to-life as part of deal

Filed under
Reiser

contracostatimes.com: Hans Reiser was sentenced today to 15-years-to life for the murder of his estranged wife Nina Reiser two years ago. The sentence handed down in Alameda County Superior Court follows a deal Reiser made to lead authorities to the location of his wife's body in the Oakland Hills last month.

Why Switch to Linux?

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: In an interesting post on Lifehacker, the editors ask the readers "Why did you switch to Linux?" The question drew quite a lot of interesting responses, including some very offbeat reasons for why people made the switch.

Opera grasps at straws with latest IE criticism

Filed under
Software

blogs.zdnet.com: Let me say from the outset that I was not a fan of Opera Software’s antitrust sabre-rattling a few months back over Microsoft’s lack of standards compliancy with its browser. But Opera’s latest complaints about Internet Explorer (IE) 8 make Opera look even more like a company that’s gone off the deep end.

Build an embedded Linux distro from scratch

In this tutorial, you learn about cross-compiling, the boot loader, file systems, the root file system, disk images, and the boot process, all with respect to the decisions you make as you're building the system and creating the distribution.

Moving from Mac to Ubuntu: Why I’m switching

Filed under
Ubuntu

meganmcdermott.com: When I started my new job in October the computer that I had to use was a Power Mac G5. This wasn’t my choosing - the guy before me really liked macs and had the whole office switch over several years ago. I was allowed to get a new laptop as well, and chose a Lenovo Thinkpad T61 and installed Ubuntu.

Open Source Culture Needs To Be Security Culture, Too

Filed under
OSS

informationweek.com/blog: How to react to the news that an earlier flaw in Debian's random-number generator has been used to fuel an honest-to-Linus exploit, especially after yesterday's post? Welcome to the tip of the iceberg.

The 7 Best Closed-Source Apps for Linux

Filed under
Software

intranetjournal.com: With all of the noise going back and forth about how open source software is "better" for the end user, I am of the mind that this is clearly in the eyes of the beholder. I can think of a number of instances where the closed source alternative still outshines the FOSS alternatives.

Where the Linux laptops live

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet.com: Almost one-third of the 25 top-selling laptops at Amazon.com are sold with Linux. (Shown is their top-selling Linux laptop, an Asus EEEpc 900 unit.)

PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniMe tips and tricks

Filed under
PCLOS

bitburners.com: PCLinuxOS is awesome. Especially I like the “2008 MiniMe” edition, which comes as a bare-bone installable live CD, and contains only the KDE desktop essentials. I have recently installed a couple of PCLinuxOS systems. Along the way I learned a few useful tricks, which I wanted to share with the public.

Choosing which way to walk with Linux

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: I use Linux in a variety of ways, business, home, hobby. Because of the ways I use Linux, I am glad there are choices in distros. A plethora of options to look through, see what works best for what situation.

Opera 9.6 Snapshot: Birthday Edition

Filed under
Software

opera.com: We're making steady progress on Opera 9.6, fixing several of the issues reported within the last week. Please continue to test and report problems help us improve Opera.

Stuff That Works With Linux #3 - Huawei USB Modem

Filed under
Hardware

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: MOBILE broadband has been getting a huge marketing push in the UK. But all the operators say their products - from USB dongles to PCI Express adaptors - are only for Windows or Mac.

Choosing a Desktop Environment for SUSE Linux

Filed under
SUSE

computingtech.blogspot: With Windows and the Macintosh, the desktop is just that—the desktop. Linux is all about choices, and so is X, KDE or GNOME. One of the cool things is that you can remain indecisive your whole life.

Ubuntu, Debian plan big releases

Filed under
Linux

mybroadband.co.za: Linux fans are in for a treat in the remaining few months of the year as most of the major Linux distributors prepare to release updated versions of their operating systems.

Introduction to the Xwindows clipboard

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: One of the things that amazes a lot of new users to Linux is how flexible the clipboard is. It's one of the many features of Linux that I've come to depend upon greatly. Without it, life could go on, but it would be much, much more difficult.

Open source in an economic downturn

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: We are in an economic downturn, perhaps even a full-blown recession. In these circumstances the IT budget is one of the first places to come under scrutiny, and most IT departments are coming under increasing pressure to save every penny.

New security hole in VLC video player

Filed under
Security

heise-online.co.uk: A new critical security hole has been found in the VLC player from the VideoLan project, while there is still no public fix for the previous security hole found two weeks ago.

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More in Tux Machines

Kernel: CH341 and LWN Articles (Just Freed)

  • Linux Adds CH341 GPIO
    There was a time when USB to serial hardware meant one company: FTDI. But today there are quite a few to choose from and one of the most common ones is the WCH CH341. There’s been support for these chips in Linux for a while, but only for use as a communication port. The device actually has RS232, I2C, SPI, and 8 general purpose I/O (GPIO) pins. [ZooBaB] took an out-of-tree driver that exposes the GPIO, and got it working with some frightening-looking CH341 boards.
  • Shrinking the kernel with an axe
    This is the third article of a series discussing various methods of reducing the size of the Linux kernel to make it suitable for small environments. The first article provided a short rationale for this topic, and covered link-time garbage collection. The second article covered link-time optimization (LTO) and compared its results to link-time garbage collection. In this article we'll explore ways to make LTO more effective at optimizing kernel code away, as well as more assertive strategies to achieve our goal.
  • The rest of the 4.16 merge window
    At the close of the 4.16 merge window, 11,746 non-merge changesets had been merged; that is 5,000 since last week's summary. This merge window is thus a busy one, though not out of line with its predecessors — 4.14 had 11,500 changesets during its merge window, while 4.15 had 12,599. Quite a bit of that work is of the boring internal variety; over 600 of those changesets were device-tree updates, for example. But there was still a fair amount of interesting work merged in the second half of the 4.16 merge window; read on for the highlights.

Wine-Staging and Games

Canonical Outs New Ubuntu Kernel Update with Compiler-Based Retpoline Mitigation

New Linux kernel security updates have been released for Ubuntu 17.10 (Artful Aardvark), Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), Ubuntu 14.04 LTS (Trusty Tahr), and Ubuntu 12.04 ESM (Extended Security Maintenance), adding the compiler-based retpoline kernel mitigation for the Spectre Variant 2 vulnerability on amd64 and i386 architectures. Canonical fixed the Spectre Variant 2 security vulnerability last month on January 22, but only for 64-bit Ubuntu installations. This update apparently mitigates the issue for 32-bit installations too. Spectre is a nasty hardware bug in microprocessors that use branch prediction and speculative execution and it could allow unauthorized memory reads via side-channel attacks. Read more

Tutanota: Encrypted Open Source Email Service for Privacy Minded People

If you are a privacy concerned netizen, try Tutanota. It is an open source email service for encrypted email communication. Here are the pros and cons of using Tutanota. Read more