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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 21 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 492 srlinuxx 28/01/2013 - 9:31pm
Story Enlightenment’s E17: Ready for prime time? srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 8:34pm
Story The Biggest systemd Myths srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 8:21pm
Story Best alternative Linux desktops: 5 reviewed and rated srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 6:23pm
Story A quick look at Manjaro srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 5:05am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 11:19pm
Story Ubuntu Not Switching to Rolling Release Model srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:55am
Story Xfce 4.12 Desktop Is Moving Along For Release Soon srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:53am
Story Design the New OpenMandriva Logo srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:51am
Story Does SUSE Linux Have A Future? srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:50am

City uses Linux, OSS for its free municipal Wi-Fi

Filed under
Linux

the inquirer: SINCE LAST week the coastal city of Rosario, Argentina's second largest city and home of about a million people is among the growing club of World cities with free municipal Wi-Fi access.

Linux Has Just Vanished Forever

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: You wake up one morning and you suddenly realize that Linux no longer exists. Regardless of how absurd this sounds, it does provoke some interesting points from various Linux users, and today, we'll be exploring these closely.

Top 5 Linux Myths

Filed under
Linux

OSWeekly: The sheer ignorance regarding casual Linux users astounds me to no end. While I'm not interested in pointing fingers, there is a lot of misinformation about the Linux community, and we will help to dispel some of these myths, once and for all.

Keep users informed with PHPList

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you've ever considered throwing together a mailing list to keep the members of your group, project, or organization informed, you'd be hard-pressed to find a better application for that purpose than PHPList, a free and open source newsletter manager.

How To Manage An iPod From A Linux Desktop With Rhythmbox

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This article shows how you can use an iPod on a Linux desktop with the Rhythmbox audio player. It covers how you can upload MP3 files from your desktop to your iPod and delete files on the iPod.

Linux: Custom Kernels with Debian and Fedora

Filed under
HowTos

Carla Schroder: Last week we took a tour of the generic way of building custom Linux kernels. Today we'll look some nice Debian shortcuts, and Fedora's unique way of building custom kernels.

Acer installs Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

the inquirer: COMPUTER MAKER Acer seems to have followed Dell's lead and started preinstalling Ubuntu in at least one range of its laptops.

Firefox 2.0.0.6 update available now

Filed under
Moz/FF

mozillalinks: A quick update to Firefox 2.0.x branch has been released by Mozilla to address a couple of security related bugs.

Also: Make Firefox Extensions Compatible After Firefox Update Breaks Them For No Good Reason

Today's Too Many to Link tos

Filed under
News
  • Tips and Tricks: How do I find the inode size of an ext2/ext3 filesystem?

  • How would you change the OLPC XO?
  • Uh Oh. Another Smooth Move from Microsoft: Watch out, Ruby. Watch out OSI.
  • GPLv3 report: 30% increase with Sugar on top
  • If someone says UBUNTU, Don't say Kazoonteit.
  • Medison Celebrity: CEO Blog and Yahoo Group
  • Open source firm reaps Google benefits
  • Linux Non-compete Agreements?
  • Linux: Avoiding Pluggable Designs
  • Open Source Being Repositioned in Corporate America
  • Linux: Designing the Completely Fair Scheduler

Debunking Linux and its Relationship with Gaming

Filed under
Gaming

micahville: I’m tired of people who are afraid to switch to Linux because of its so called “lack of games, or at least good ones.” What I think is they just want the games they like ported to Linux instead of trying new ones. Or maybe it’s because the games are free and that is already a sign the game is bad, but I’m beginning to think quite the opposite. I have a list here of 17 games that I think every Linux user should give a shot.

Free Software Money Management Quandary

Filed under
Software

Moving to Freedom: I found myself facing a moral quandary yesterday. I considered using proprietary software for a job that has lots of free software alternatives. You see, I have these doubts and reservations about the free options.

Unix/Linux rootkits 101

Filed under
Security

techrepublic blogs: The term rootkit originated with a reference to the root user account on Unix systems. Rootkits are not limited to Unix, however, or even to administrative user accounts like the Unix root account. No matter what operating system you use, you should be familiar with good practices for detecting and dealing with the threat of rootkits.

Also: Clamav is great

Amarok Sneak peak, pretty playlist, raw plasma

Filed under
Software

Amarok Blog: I thought it was time to post a screenshot of how Amarok2 development is moving along. As my focus is on the service integration, I have chosen to show a few of the new things that are happening in this area, as well as some of the more general and cool stuff that is being worked on.

NVIDIA & ATI GTK Benchmarks

Filed under
Hardware

Phoronix: Since publishing our Avivo versus fglrx driver GtkPerf benchmarks that compared the GTK performance between the community open-source driver and ATI's official driver, we have received a number of requests for more of these 2D benchmarks with different graphics cards and different drivers.

Enterprising Ubuntu?

Filed under
Ubuntu

RedMonk: In the three years since Ubuntu was unleashed upon an unsuspecting populace, debate as to its viability and marketability within “the enterprise,” whatever that means anymore, has been rampant. Cynics contend that the status quo - where there’s Red Hat and there’s everyone else - is also the shape of things to come.

Managing wireless connections seamlessly with wicd

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: The nature of my work forces me to be something of a digital nomad -- my notebook computer and a wireless connection are essential parts of my working day. I've been known to move between several wireless access points in one day. One of the few wireless connection managers that I've actually found useful is wicd - pronounced "wicked."

Try out KDE 4 now with the “KDE Four Live” CD

Filed under
KDE

FOSSwire: Development on KDE 4, the next major version of the popular desktop environment, continues and if you’re curious as to what progress is like, you might want to take a look at what is going on right now.

Tech writers think Ubuntu is for morons

Filed under
Ubuntu

jem report: What is it about Ubuntu Linux that makes otherwise competent technical writers switch to Moron Mode? Everywhere I turn, I see articles on how to do obvious things in Ubuntu.

Torvalds rebukes desktop critics

Filed under
Linux

LinuxWorld: Linus Torvalds, creator and maintainer of the Linux operating system kernel, has reacted angrily to suggestions that the kernel's development process is skewed in a way that prevents improvements on the desktop.

Laptop webcam works with AMSN in Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Hardware

Arun's Blog: I did a fresh install of Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon Tribe 3 on my laptop on Saturday. The good news is, AMSN detected my built in webcam automatically and the video chat worked fine.

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More in Tux Machines

Open source docks with mainstream vendors

Open source and mainstream are joining forces this week as the Docker software containerisation platform comes under the spotlight at technology-focused network and information sessions in Cape Town and Johannesburg. "The diversity of our partners at the event − Docker, Microsoft Azure, Atlassian, SUSE and HPE – is a clear indication of the excitement around the Docker platform," says Muggie van Staden, MD of Obsidian Systems. Read more

What’s the best Linux firewall distro of 2017?

You don’t have to manage a large corporate network to use a dedicated firewall. While your Linux distro will have an impressive firewall – and an equally impressive arsenal of tools to manage it – the advantages don’t extend to the other devices on your network. A typical network has more devices connected to the internet than the total number of computers and laptops in your SOHO. With the onslaught of IoT, it won’t be long before your router doles out IP addresses to your washing machine and microwave as well. The one thing you wouldn’t want in this Jetsonian future is having to rely on your router’s limited firewall capabilities to shield your house – and everyone in it – from the malicious bits and bytes floating about on the internet. A dedicated firewall stands between the internet and internal network, sanitising the traffic flowing into the latter. Setting one up is an involved process both in terms of assembling the hardware and configuring the software. However, there are quite a few distros that help you set up a dedicated firewall with ease, and we’re going to look at the ones that have the best protective open source software and roll them into a convenient and easy to use package. Read more

Zorin OS 12 Business Edition Launches with macOS, Unity, and GNOME 2 Layouts

Three months after launching the biggest release ever of the Ubuntu-based operating system, the Zorin OS team is today announcing the availability of Zorin OS 12 Business Edition. Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) and powered by the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel, Zorin OS 12 Business Edition ships with the innovative Zorin Desktop 2.0 desktop environment that offers multiple layouts for all tastes. These means that you can make your Zorin OS 12 desktop look like macOS, GNOME 2, or Unity with a click. Read more

GNOME and Other Software

  • Nautilus 3.24 – The changes
    Since Nautilus was created, if a user wanted to open a folder where the user didn’t have permissions, for example a system folder where only root has access, it was required to start Nautilus with sudo. However running UI apps under root is strongly discouraged, and to be honest, quite inconvenient. Running any UI app with sudo is actually not even supported in Wayland by design due to the security issues that that conveys.
  • GNOME hackaton in Brno
    Last week, we had a presentation on Google Summer of Code and Outreachy at Brno University of Technology. Around 80 students attended which was a pretty good success considering it was not part of any course. It was a surprise for the uni people as well because the room they booked was only for 60 ppl.
  • Peek Gif Recorder Gets Updated, Now Available from a PPA
    Peek, the nifty animated gif screen capture app for Linux desktops, has been updated. Peek 0.9 reduces the size of temporary files, adds a resolution downsampling option (to help the app use fewer resources when rendering your gif), and introduces fallback support for avconf should ffmpeg be unavailable.
  • Cerebro is an Open Source OS X Spotlight Equivalent for Linux
    Billed as an ‘open-source productivity booster with a brain’, Cerebro is an Electron app able to run across multiple platforms. It’s an extendable, open-source alternative to Spotlight and Alfred on macOS, and Synapse, Kupfer, Ulauncher, GNOME Do, and others on Linux.
  • JBoss Fuse 6.3 integration services for Red Hat OpenShift released
    Red Hat announced the latest update to the Red Hat JBoss Fuse-based integration service on Red Hat OpenShift. With the growth of the Internet of Things (IoT), cloud-based SaaS systems, and new data streams, organizations can face increasing pressure to more quickly deliver innovative new services. Traditional centralized, monolithic ESB-style integration approaches are often ill-suited to support the business in responding to this pressure.
  • Fedora 25: The perf linux tool.
  • Meet the chap open-sourcing US govt code – Paul, an ex-Microsoft anti-piracy engineer [Ed: Used to work for Microsoft and now spreads the GPL ("cancer" according to Microsoft) in the US government]
    The manager of the project, Berg said, really wanted to release MOOSE as open source, but didn't know how to do so. As a result it took 18 months to traverse government bureaucracy and to obtain the necessary permissions. It's now available under the GPL 2.1 license.