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Monday, 16 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Full-length review: Ubuntu, Xubuntu and Ubuntu Studio 7.04, and dyne:bolic 2.4.2

Filed under
Linux

the distrogue: Well, the promised uber-review is finally here. With the release of Ubuntu 7.04 (aka "Feisty Fawn"), a new fork of Ubuntu, named "Ubuntu Studio", was released, to go along with Kubuntu ("LinuKs for KHumans", released with 5.04), Edubuntu ("Linux for Young Humans", 5.10), and Xubuntu ("Linux for Gamers and Humans with Old Hardware", 6.06 LTS). It focuses on content creation, containing numerous tools for audio, video, and picture manipulation and creation.

Linux/OSS developers: stop following and start leading

Filed under
OSS

Marc Wagner: This morning, I read a piece by my Education IT colleague, Chris Dawson, entitled Making “hamburger of Microsoft’s cash cow” and I was struck by one important observation: “Open Office needs to worry less about duplicating features of Office and more about “selling” itself as a viable piece of software in its own right. “

The Open-Source ATI R500 Driver

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: Last week the first open-source ATI R500 (Radeon X1000 series) driver had entered the world. This new driver (named the xf86-video-avivo) is very early into development and does not yet contain any 3D functionality or support for features that most end-users expect. Even with this very basic R500 driver, we couldn't help but to explore the Avivo driver for the past few days.

Linux for Newbies

Filed under
Linux

Pimp Your Linux: Are you interested in moving to Linux, but have no idea how the terminal works? Are you used to commands like “dir” in dos, but have no idea how to do them in Linux? This is a great guide to get you started with the basic commands.

Using Ubuntu: What Package Did This File Come From?

Filed under
HowTos

the How-To Geek: How many times have you noticed a file sitting in a directory and wondered… where did this file come from? Or you are trying to tell a friend how to use a utility but he doesn't have it installed, and you can't remember what package you installed to get it.

What?!?!? Linux now NEEDS Microsoft?!?!?

Filed under
Linux

Penguin Pete: Nothing's more disappointing than watching the dunce in the corner suddenly appear to be on the verge of getting his first clue, only to get distracted and go back to rooting in his nostril at the last second. Groans all around! Well, that zany SJVN is at it again.

US Department of Defense: We love open source lots and lots

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Dave, who was clearly being held back by me over at Open Sources, the Department of Defense's latest Software Tech News, and highlights some interesting factoids (though he fails to read pages 37-38, which focus on Alfresco Wink:

Suse updates put Linux and Windows side by side

Filed under
SUSE

the inquirer: NOVELL HAS FINALLY introduced Service Pack 1 for Suse Linux Enterprise Server 10, delivering improved virtualisation and quad-core support, it said.

Barloworld builds on open source, Drupal

Filed under
Drupal

tectonic: Automotive engineers Barloworld CVT Technologies have set up on online presence using open source software and the Drupal content management system.

Also: The World Bank goes open-source

Google Killing Microsoft?

Filed under
Google

Blog of Gentoo: I just read a digg story, titled "The Google Product That Could Kill Microsoft". So, here I am, thinking about it bit more. I will go over this in a little more detail:

Also: The Gears that could ‘augur the death of Microsoft’

Microphones & Skype on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

geeky bits: Today I installed Skype in Ubuntu 7.04. There can be a number of problems running Skype in Ubuntu. Yet my biggest concern was getting my microphone working.

Splitting Apache Logs With vlogger

Filed under
HowTos

Vlogger is a little tool with which you can write Apache logs broken down by virtual hosts and days.

Dual Monitors With Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

lockergnome blogs: Over and over, I hear people asking me “how do I get dual monitors working in Ubuntu“. Well today, I will show you (note the video) how to make this easy with a fairly modern NVIDIA card, two flat screen LCDs (one DVI, the other VGA) and a little understanding how getting two monitors working in Ubuntu Linux is a snap, once you understand the basics.

Visuwords: WordNet goes graphical

Filed under
Software

linux.com: WordNet is one of the best English language references available, but its command-line and rather primitive graphical interfaces don't really do it justice. WordNet would greatly benefit from a graphical front-end similar to Visual Thesaurus that allows you to view and explore the connections between different words. Fortunately, there is a tool that does exactly that.

Blocking ad servers with dnsmasq

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: I was chatting with a colleague over IRC on Tuesday and he was complaining about the new update for Bind9 that broke his automatic blocking of ad servers. Naturally I was curious and asked him what he was talking about..

Torvalds doesn’t live in Indiana

Paul Murphy: The trouble with the worker’s paradise idea is that it takes a dictator to make it happen - meaning that the happier the workers and useful idiots proclaim themselves, the worse off they are likely to actually be.

24-hour test drive: PC-BSD

Filed under
BSD

arstechnica: PC-BSD is not a Linux distribution, but rather what could be considered among the first major FreeBSD-based distributions to live outside of the official FreeBSD. Like most distributions, it has implemented certain features in a way that attempts to distinguish it from the competition, and I will focus mostly on these differences.

Linux gaming

Filed under
Gaming

kahvipapu: Linux might not have as much games as Windows (or game consoles) but people enjoying this wonderful open source operating system can have fun with games too, as there are a lot of free games for Linux available, even some huge commercial ones. So what’s the state of Linux gaming?

Green Linux to attack power consumption

Filed under
Linux

vnunet.com: The Linux Foundation has formed a "Green Linux" initiative that will focus on reducing the open source operating system's power consumption.

Also: No politics please, we’re Linux

Quake 4 v1.4.2

Filed under
Gaming

linuxgames: id Software has made the 1.4.2 Point Release for Quake 4 available. Changes include: Refined hitboxes, Optimized sound and network code, Configurable fps caps, & Weapon balancing.

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More in Tux Machines

Hardware With Linux

  • Raspberry Pi's new computer for industrial applications goes on sale
    The new Raspberry Pi single-board computer is smaller and cheaper than the last, but its makers aren’t expecting the same rush of buyers that previous models have seen. The Raspberry Pi Compute Module 3 will be more of a “slow burn,” than last year’s Raspberry Pi 3, its creator Eben Upton predicted. That’s because it’s designed not for school and home use but for industrial applications. To make use of it, buyers will first need to design a product with a slot on the circuit board to accommodate it and that, he said, will take time.
  • ZeroPhone — An Open Source, Dirt Cheap, Linux-powered Smartphone Is Here
    ZeroPhone is an open source smartphone that’s powered by Raspberry Pi Zero. It runs on Linux and you can make one for yourself using parts worth $50. One can use it to make calls and SMS, run apps, and pentesting. Soon, phone’s crowdfunding is also expected to go live.
  • MSI X99A RAIDER Plays Fine With Linux
    This shouldn't be a big surprise though given the Intel X99 chipset is now rather mature and in the past I've successfully tested the MSI X99A WORKSTATION and X99S SLI PLUS motherboards on Linux. The X99A RAIDER is lower cost than these other MSI X99 motherboards I've tested, which led me in its direction, and then sticking with MSI due to the success with these other boards and MSI being a supporter of Phoronix and encouraging our Linux hardware testing compared to some other vendors.
  • First 3.5-inch Kaby Lake SBC reaches market
    Axiomtek’s 3.5-inch CAPA500 SBC taps LGA1151-ready CPUs from Intel’s 7th and 6th Generations, and offers PCIe, dual GbE, and optional “ZIO” expansion. Axiomtek’s CAPA500 is the first 3.5-inch form-factor SBC that we’ve seen that supports Intel’s latest 7th Generation “Kaby Lake” processors. Kaby Lake is similar enough to the 6th Gen “Skylake” family, sharing 14nm fabrication, Intel Gen 9 Graphics, and other features, to enable the CAPA500 to support both 7th and 6th Gen Core i7/i5/i3 CPUs as long as they use an LGA1151 socket. Advantech’s Kaby Lake based AIMB-205 Mini-ITX board supports the same socket. The CAPA500 ships with an Intel H110 chipset, and a Q170 is optional.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Project launches updated Debian GNU/Linux 8.7 with bug fixes
    An updated version of Debian, a popular Linux distribution is now available for users to download and install. According to the post on the Debian website by Debian Project, the new version is 8.7. This is the seventh update to the Debian eight distribution, and the update primarily focuses on fixing bugs and security problems. This update also includes some adjustments to fix serious problems present in the previous version.
  • Freexian’s report about Debian Long Term Support, December 2016
    The number of sponsored hours did not increase but a new silver sponsor is in the process of joining. We are only missing another silver sponsor (or two to four bronze sponsors) to reach our objective of funding the equivalent of a full time position.
  • APK, images and other stuff.
    Also, I was pleased to see F-droid Verification Server as a sign of F-droid progress on reproducible builds effort - I hope these changes to diffoscope will help them!
  • Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Gets a Beta Release, Ships with KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS
    After landing on the official download channels a few days ago, the Beta version of the upcoming Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" KDE Edition operating system got today, January 16, 2017, an official announcement. The KDE Edition is the last in the new Linux Mint 18.1 "Serena" stable series to be published, and it was delayed a little bit because Clement Lefebvre and his team wanted it to ship with latest KDE Plasma 5.8 LTS desktop environment from the Kubuntu Backports PPA repository.
  • Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 — Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu In One ISO
    Linux AIO is a multiboot ISO carrying different flavors of a single Linux distribution and eases you from the pain of keeping different bootable USBs. The latest Linux AIO Ubuntu 16.10 is now available for download in both 64-bit and 32-bit versions. It features various Ubuntu flavors including Ubuntu GNOME, Kubuntu, Lubuntu, Ubuntu MATE, and Xubuntu.

Top Ubuntu Editing Apps: Image, Audio, Video

It's been my experience that most people aren't aware of the scope of creative software available for Ubuntu. The reason for this is complicated, but I suspect it mostly comes down to the functional availability provided by each application title for the Linux desktop. In this article, I'm going to give you an introduction to some of the best creative software applications for Ubuntu (and other Linux distros). Read more

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Google's open-source Draco promises to squeeze richer 3D worlds into the web, gaming, and VR
    Google has published a set of open source libraries that should improve the storage and transmission of 3D graphics, which could help deliver more detailed 3D apps.
  • Why every business should consider an open source point of sale system
    Point of sale (POS) systems have come a long way from the days of simple cash registers that rang up purchases. Today, POS systems can be all-in-one solutions that include payment processing, inventory management, marketing tools, and more. Retailers can receive daily reports on their cash flow and labor costs, often from a mobile device. The POS is the lifeblood of a business, and that means you need to choose one carefully. There are a ton of options out there, but if you want to save money, adapt to changing business needs, and keep up with technological advances, you would be wise to consider an open source system. An open source POS, where the source code is exposed for your use, offers significant advantages over a proprietary system that keeps its code rigidly under wraps.
  • Can academic faculty members teach with Wikipedia?
    Since 2010, 29,000 students have completed the Wiki Ed program. They have added 25 million words to Wikipedia, or the equivalent of 85,000 printed pages of content. This is 66% of the total words in the last print edition of Encyclopedia Britannica. When Wiki Ed students are most active, they are contributing 10% of all the content being added to underdeveloped, academic content areas on Wikipedia.
  • AMD HSA IL / BRIG Front-End Still Hoping To Get Into GCC 7
    For many months now there's been work on an AMD HSA IL front-end for GCC with supporting the BRIG binary form of the Heterogeneous System Architecture Intermediate Language (HSA IL). It's getting late into GCC 7 development and onwards to its final development stage while this new front-end has yet to be merged. Developer Pekka Jääskeläinen has been trying to get in the finishing reviews and changes for getting approval to land this BRIG front-end into the GNU Compiler Collection. It's a big addition and with GCC 7 soon just focusing on wrong-code fixes, bug fixes, and documentation fixes starting on 19 January, there would be just a few days left to land this new front-end for GCC 7 to avoid having to wait until next year for it to debut in stable with GCC 8.
  • Rcpp 0.12.9: Next round
    Yesterday afternoon, the nineth update in the 0.12.* series of Rcpp made it to the CRAN network for GNU R. Windows binaries have by now been generated; and the package was updated in Debian too. This 0.12.9 release follows the 0.12.0 release from late July, the 0.12.1 release in September, the 0.12.2 release in November, the 0.12.3 release in January, the 0.12.4 release in March, the 0.12.5 release in May, the 0.12.6 release in July, the 0.12.7 release in September, and the 0.12.8 release in November --- making it the thirteenth release at the steady bi-montly release frequency. Rcpp has become the most popular way of enhancing GNU R with C or C++ code. As of today, 906 packages on CRAN depend on Rcpp for making analytical code go faster and further. That is up by sixthythree packages over the two months since the last release -- or about a package a day!