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Sunday, 18 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Greens urge end to software patents

stuff.co.nz: The Green Party has called for an overhaul of patent laws that would prevent software being patented. The party's policy on information technology was released by MP Metiria Turei.

Why does Apple Always Seem to Get a Break???

Filed under
OS

linux-foundation.org/weblogs/jzemlin: Walking around Linuxworld this year it was interesting to see the number of Apple notebooks in the halls and various sessions. It wasn’t necessarily that there were more Apple notebooks than Linux machines, but it was a good number and begs the question: why do open source people seem to cut Apple some slack when it comes to their very closed proprietary platform?

Ubuntu: Can Your Business Trust A Free System

Filed under
Ubuntu

bloggista.com: Got to be honest, the first time I heard about Ubuntu was sometime April of this year over at Archon-Digital’s blog when he made an article of his switch to Ubuntu. Even after reading his post, I still didn’t get the idea of what exactly Ubuntu is all about.

New Linux-powered Kindle on its way

Filed under
Hardware

practical-tech.com: The Kindle, Amazon’s Linux-powered electronic paper book will have at least one new version out for the 2008 holiday season. The second generation Kindle is expected to have both an improved user-interface and a larger screen.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #105

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #105 for the week of August 17th - August 23rd, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Major update of Ubuntu Brainstorm: Call for testing, Ubuntu New Jersey 2008 BBQ/LAN party, and Happy Birthday Linux.

Ubuntu 8.10 - My Thoughts So Far

Filed under
Ubuntu

joeb454.co.uk: I know it’s only Alpha 4, but I decided to install it on my laptop last night because I can, and I had nothing else to do. So far so good, it’s got to be said! There’s a few issues I’ve noticed though, these are:

Debating the Firefox SSL Certificate

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcworld.com: Debate is reaching a fever pitch over a new security feature in Firefox 3.0 that throws out a warning page to users when a Web site's SSL certificate is expired or has not been issued by a trusted third party.

Open source moves into the mainstream

Filed under
OSS

nzherald.co.nz: If your business hasn't yet dipped its toe into the open-source software waters, it's as behind the times as a company five years ago that was not yet on the internet.

Another OLPC man goes his own way

Filed under
OLPC

itwire.com: Another stalwart of the One Laptop per Child Project has gone his own way - after telling project founder Nicholas Negroponte that he (Negroponte) had failed to go beyond the stage of a prototype.

openSUSE Election Committee Founded

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: We now have founded an openSUSE Election Committee. The openSUSE election committee will organize and oversee the first openSUSE Board election, the board has authorized it to decide any open questions on the elections.

DRM Patches For Linux 2.6.27 Kernel

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: While the merge window for the Linux 2.6.27 kernel has already closed, we will hopefully see a few more Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) patches.

Red Hat fesses up to Fedora FOSS security fiasco

Filed under
Linux
Security

itwire.com: A week or so ago, end users of the Linux-based Red Hat Fedora OS were warned to avoid downloading packages due to an "issue in the infrastructure systems" which waved big red flags suggesting a security breach to many industry observers.

25 killer Linux apps

Filed under
Software

techradar.com: We all know that Linux is about choice. Everyone has the choice of what they use and how they use it. A consequence of this is that there's a huge range of software out there. We'll highlight some of the choices available to you for some of the most common desktop tasks.

Review: Kubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Alpha 4

Filed under
Ubuntu

headshotgamer.com: I'm going to look at Kubuntu 8.10 Alpha 4, an often overlooked distribution due to Ubuntu stealing most of the limelight (and don't forget Xubuntu, which stands in the shadow of both Ubuntu and Kubuntu).

ext3 with data=journal results

Filed under
Linux

kmandla.wordpress: I’ve been toying with a minimal Ubuntu installation identical to the one I built for the Hardy speed guide, but this time I used data=journal as a flag for the default ext3 filesystem.

PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniME - Beauty Meets Beast

Filed under
PCLOS

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: I have long been performance-hungry, and I don't mind spending hours in tinkering my desktop/laptop for maximum speed and performance. During my long 15 years of tweaking and tinkering I found PCLinuxOS 2008 MiniME to be the best, because it has already been tweaked and tested for me.

Downgrade to XP or Upgrade to Mandriva

Filed under
MDV

lazytechguy.com: My friend wanted a low cost Laptop and went for Dell 1525. Here in Singapore, it is really a value for money Notebook. Everything is OK with this Laptop, just one issue- It has Vista Basic. We discussed his problem and came with two possible alternatives:

odds & ends (leftovers)

Filed under
News
  • The Hacker Test: More Linux and Unix Humor

  • Docunification
  • Freezy Linux is a free, easy-to-use Linux-based operating system
  • Zimbra Adds Support for Ubuntu 8.04
  • The Origins of Linux - Linus Torvalds

IS Ubuntu Hardy really THAT buggy ?

Filed under
Ubuntu

lazytechguy.com: Blogsphere and forums are full of post saying that hardy is much more buggy than Gutsy or any other previous release. Come on this is a LTS release, how can this be so buggy ? Lets take a look at some of the posts

and a few more

Filed under
HowTos
  • Short Tip: Compare revisions with SVN

  • How to split screen your command line
  • Installing and Running sendmail in Red Hat Linux
  • How I repaired a corrupted grub menu.lst config file
  • Using more than 4 GB RAM on Debian etch 32bit
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More in Tux Machines

LMMS Guide Part 1: Creating Simple Melodies Using Sounds And Instruments

​LMMS stands for Linux Multimedia Studio. It is a very good open-source program that is used to create music tracks using sound files, predefined instruments, and sound effects. LMMS has versions for Windows and macOS in addition to Linux. Their website, of course, lists all of their features offered to users. This article will attempt to provide practical guides and tips for composing songs using LMMS. Read
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How To Create Shell Scripts

Having to type the same command over and over again can be a daunting task and tiresome for that matter. The shell scripts are really easy to create and run saving you from a lot of misery and anguish if you really prefer using the terminal over using the GUI for running tasks. Read
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Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • Thousands of FedEx customers' private info exposed in legacy server data breach

    Uncovered by Kromtech Security Center, the parent company of MacKeeper Security, the breach exposed data such as passport information, driver's licenses and other high profile security IDs, all of which were hosted on a password-less Amazon S3 storage server.

  • Correlated Cryptojacking

    they include The City University of New York (cuny.edu), Uncle Sam's court information portal (uscourts.gov), Lund University (lu.se), the UK's Student Loans Company (slc.co.uk), privacy watchdog The Information Commissioner's Office (ico.org.uk) and the Financial Ombudsman Service (financial-ombudsman.org.uk), plus a shedload of other .gov.uk and .gov.au sites, UK NHS services, and other organizations across the globe.

    Manchester.gov.uk, NHSinform.scot, agriculture.gov.ie, Croydon.gov.uk, ouh.nhs.uk, legislation.qld.gov.au, the list goes on.

  • Facebook using 2FA cell numbers for spam, replies get posted to the platform

    Replies ending up as comments appears to be a bizarre bug, but the spamming seems intentional.

  • Swedish Police website hacked [sic] to mine cryptocurrency

    Remember now, it is a Police Force that allowed their website to be hijacked by this simple attack vector. The authority assigned to serve and protect. More specifically, the authority that argues that wiretapping is totally safe because the Police is competent in IT security matters, so there’s no risk whatsoever your data will leak or be mishandled.

    This is one of the websites that were trivially hacked [sic].

    It gives pause for thought.

    It also tells you what you already knew: authorities can’t even keep their own dirtiest laundry under wraps, so the notion that they’re capable or even willing to protect your sensitive data is hogwash of the highest order.

  • New EU Privacy Law May Weaken Security

    In a bid to help domain registrars comply with the GDPR regulations, ICANN has floated several proposals, all of which would redact some of the registrant data from WHOIS records. Its mildest proposal would remove the registrant’s name, email, and phone number, while allowing self-certified 3rd parties to request access to said data at the approval of a higher authority — such as the registrar used to register the domain name.

    The most restrictive proposal would remove all registrant data from public WHOIS records, and would require legal due process (such as a subpoena or court order) to reveal any information supplied by the domain registrant.

  • Intel hit with 32 lawsuits over security flaws

    Intel Corp said on Friday shareholders and customers had filed 32 class action lawsuits against the company in connection with recently-disclosed security flaws in its microchips.

  • The Risks of "Responsible Encryption"

    Federal law enforcement officials in the United States have recently renewed their periodic demands for legislation to regulate encryption. While they offer few technical specifics, their general proposal—that vendors must retain the ability to decrypt for law enforcement the devices they manufacture or communications their services transmit—presents intractable problems that would-be regulators must not ignore.

  • Reviewing SSH Mastery 2nd Ed

    It’s finally out ! Michael W Lucas is one of the best authors of technical books out there. I was curious about this new edition. It is not a reference book, but covers the practical aspects of SSH that I wish everybody knew. Rather than aggregating different articles/blogs on SSH, this book covers 90% of the common use cases for SSH that you will ever encounter.