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Wednesday, 17 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Leaving the mockup phase

Filed under
KDE
Software

nienhueser.de: Found some time this weekend to continue working on the contacts plasmoid and some basic functionality is now there. Kudos to the plasma team for the great API. The data engine now supports querying kopete, but is designed to support other contact backends in the future.

A first look at Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

technologytales.com: I must admit that my curiosity got the better of me when screenshots of Ubuntu’s 8.10, otherwise known as Intrepid ibex, started to make their appearance. It is only at alpha2 stage so it’s definitely a no-no for production systems. However, it does run surprisingly smoothly even at this stage.

Unboxing the FreeRunner

Filed under
Hardware

kdubois.net: Last Tuesday, my Openmoko Freerunner showed up in the mail. I don’t really want to make rash comments about the software yet, as it will take a me a bit to acclimate to the state of the openmoko project. I do feel that its very safe to say that this phone is not ready to hit prime time just yet.

Enterprise open source gaining traction: survey

Filed under
OSS

computerworld.co.nz: At its symposium in Lisbon last month, Forrester talked to application development and enterprise architecture professionals from European firms that are actively using open source.

Simplis GNU/Linux: A new face in GNU/Linux Town

Filed under
Linux

saleem-khan.blogspot: We see many new Linux distributions released on regular basis. Some are based upon already existing major Linux distributions while others are independent projects. But not all will attract your attention until there is something really unique about them.

Baine is on Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

hyelbaine.blogspot: To the very few readers of this blog, I'm proud to present you my first blog post on a desktop or PC that is not from Microsoft Windows. Yes after much thought and deliberation, I've decided to give Linux a shot.

Do open source applications take security seriously?

Filed under
Software

blogs.zdnet.com: Not according to the folks at Fortify, who today are issuing a blistering report claiming open source projects and companies don’t take security seriously at all.

Ubuntu advantages

Filed under
Linux

jldugger.livejournal: There are some advantages to running Ubuntu I can think of, but not among those is "never search the internet for drivers again". There is a perception that this is special to Ubuntu or Linux. Oh, and also that it's true.

5 Easy Backup Solutions for Linux

Filed under
Software

brajeshwar.com: Be it Noobs or a geeks - computers are indispensable for either of the clans. The amount of data which resides in the form nibbles and bits is enormous. Backing up your data is of prime importance from work/business point of view.

Ubuntu VS Other Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot: If you log into the command line of both an Ubuntu system and a Red Hat Enterprise Linux or Fedora system, very little will look different. There are common directories and utilities between the two, and functionality is fundamentally the same. So what makes Ubuntu different from other Linux distributions?

Linux at Lowes

Filed under
Linux

helpmerick.com: I'm in the middle of a pretty major house refurbishing right now and am making frequent trips to the hardware stores and elsewhere. Today, while asking a Lowes rep a question, I glanced at one of the computer screens and saw Firefox for Lowes on the title bar.

Installing And Using OpenVZ On Fedora 9

Filed under
HowTos

In this HowTo I will describe how to prepare a Fedora 9 server for OpenVZ. With OpenVZ you can create multiple Virtual Private Servers (VPS) on the same hardware, similar to Xen and the Linux Vserver project.

today's left overs

Filed under
News
  • LSD Man Page. More Linux/Unix Humor

  • HP's ultra-portable Mini-Note
  • Cognos taps Novell SUSE Linux for mainframe debut
  • How to use Network Configuration Tool
  • KDE4: Installing and configuring Network Manager
  • MY KDE dream
  • Dell begins rolling out Ubuntu 8.04, adds media codecs
  • Software Freedom Day 2008
  • How to install GiMP 2.5.2 on Ubuntu 8.4
  • Ubuntu Kaipidi Thozhargal - Across Tamil Nadu

A (very) brief visit with OpenSuse 11.0

Filed under
SUSE

kmandla.wordpress: I threatened to abandon my Arch Linux installation the other day, and that happened of course — Crux is recompiling as I type. In between those two I installed OpenSuse just for a lark, and because I don’t think I ever worked with it before.

This is not a GTK+ 3.0 blog post

Filed under
Software

flors.wordpress: I have been trying to follow the intense debate tagged GTK+ 3.0 and actually covering a lot more, from the longest post to the shortest. If I was into film criticism I would say that the story is evolving from decadentism to apocalypticism, with elements of final time, esoterism, conspiracy, dualism and reincarnation. It’s confusing… but solvable.

SCO's Yesterday - a parody by Scott Lazar

groklaw.net: It's time for a song for SCO to sing, to cheer itself up. Scott Lazar has come up with one. Hopefully Yoko won't sue us, because you sing it to a tune that sounds a lot like Yesterday. Feel free to hum along in your minds.

The Economic Motivation of Open Source Software: Stakeholder Perspectives

Filed under
OSS

riehle.org: Open source software has changed the rules of the game, impacting significantly the economic behavior of stakeholders in the software ecosystem. In this new environment, developers strive to be committers, vendors feel pressure to produce open source products, and system integrators anticipate boosting profits.

For Linux security, principle of least privilege prevails, says Red Hat security expert

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Linux security may seem daunting, but there are a host of best practices to simplify the maze. Recently, Steve Grubb of Red Hat Inc. outlined some important security principles, including minimizing admin access, the increasing sophistication of SELinux and the importance of auditing systems.

45% are using OpenOffice

Filed under
OOo

openlogic.com/blogs: In my last post, I question the accuracy of the CIO.com survey. One of the numbers I was skeptical about was "Nearly half of the survey respondents, 45 percent, are using desktop applications such as OpenOffice.org"

Facebook Bans Firefox 3

Filed under
Moz/FF

community.zdnet.co.uk/blog: Because I dared to try and access facebook with firefox 3, and all the cookies disabled, it won't let me back on there with firefox ever again, even though all the cookies have been enabled again!!

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More in Tux Machines

Fedora: Updated F27 Live ISOs, Synergy 2.0, Bodhi 3.2.0, Announcing Flapjack

  • F27-20180112 Updated Live Isos Released
    The Fedora Respins SIG is pleased to announce the latest release of Updated 27 Live ISOs, carrying the 4.14.13-300 kernel.
  • synergy-2.0.0 is in Fedora updates-testing
    I have packed the latest stable version, 2.0.0, for Fedora 27, 26 and EPEL 7. No EPEL 6 update this time as it requires CXX14, which EL6 does not provide.
  • Bodhi 3.2.0 released
  • Announcing Flapjack
    Here’s a post about a tool that I’ve developed at work. You might find it useful if you contribute to any desktop platform libraries that are packaged as a Flatpak runtime, such as GNOME or KDE. Flatpak is a system for delivering desktop applications that was pioneered by the GNOME community. At Endless, we have jumped aboard the Flatpak train. Our product Endless OS is a Linux distribution, but not a traditional one in the sense of being a collection of packages that you install with a package manager; it’s an immmutable OS image, with atomic updates delivered through OSTree. Applications are sandboxed-only and Flatpak-only.
  • Flapjack Helps Developers Work On Components Inside Flatpak

Security Leftovers

  • Security updates for Wednesday
  • Latvia's e-health system hit by cyberattack from abroad
    Latvia said its new e-health system was on Tuesday hit by a large-scale cyberattack that saw thousands of requests for medical prescriptions pour in per second from more than 20 countries in Africa, the Caribbean and the European Union. No data was compromised, according to health officials, who immediately took down the site, which was launched earlier this month to streamline the writing of prescriptions in the Baltic state. "It is clear that it was a planned attack, a widespread attack—we might say a specialised one—as it emanated from computers located in various different countries, both inside the European Union and outside Europe," state secretary Aivars Lapins told reporters. "We received thousands of requests in a very short space of time. That's not the normal way the system works," he said, adding that an investigation is under way.
  • Linux Lite Developer Creates Automated Spectre/Meltdown Checker for Linux OSes
    The developer of the Ubuntu-based Linux Lite distribution has created a script that makes it easier for Linux users to check if their systems are vulnerable to the Meltdown and Spectre security flaws. As we reported last week, developer Stéphane Lesimple created an excellent script that would check if your Linux distribution's kernel is patched against the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities that have been publicly disclosed earlier this month and put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Purism Releases Meltdown and Spectre Patches for Its Librem Linux Laptops
    Purism, the computer technology company behind the privacy-focused, Linux-based Librem laptops and the upcoming smartphone, released patches for the Meltdown and Spectre security vulnerabilities. The company was one of the first Linux OEMs and OS vendor to announce that it's working on addressing both the Meltdown and Spectre security exploits on his Linux laptops. Meltdown and Spectre have been unearthed in early January and they are two severe hardware bugs that put billions of devices at risk of attacks.
  • Facebook Awards Security Researchers $880,000 in 2017 Bug Bounties
    Facebook is hardly a small organization, with large teams of engineers and security professionals on staff. Yet even Facebook has found that it can profit from expertise outside of the company, which is why the social networking giant has continued to benefit from its bug bounty program. In 2017, Facebook paid out $880,000 to security researchers as part of its bug bounty program. The average reward payout in 2017 was $1,900, up from $1,675 in 2016.
  • Multicloud Deployments Create Security Challenges, F5 Report Finds

Arch Linux vs. Antergos vs. Clear Linux vs. Ubuntu Benchmarks

Last week when sharing the results of tweaking Ubuntu 17.10 to try to make it run as fast as Clear Linux, it didn't take long for Phoronix readers to share their opinions on Arch Linux and the request for some optimized Arch Linux benchmarks against Clear Linux. Here are some results of that testing so far in carrying out a clean Arch Linux build with some basic optimizations compared to using Antergos Minimal out-of-the-box, Ubuntu Server, and Clear Linux. Tests this time around were done on the Intel Core i9 7980XE system with ASUS PRIME X299-A motherboard, 4 x 4GB DDR4-3200 Corsair memory, GeForce GTX 750, and Corsair Force MP500 120GB NVMe solid-state drive. The system with 18 cores / 36 threads does make for quick and easy compiling of many Linux packages. Read more

Mozilla Leftovers

  • Making WebAssembly even faster: Firefox’s new streaming and tiering compiler
    People call WebAssembly a game changer because it makes it possible to run code on the web faster. Some of these speedups are already present, and some are yet to come. One of these speedups is streaming compilation, where the browser compiles the code while the code is still being downloaded. Up until now, this was just a potential future speedup. But with the release of Firefox 58 next week, it becomes a reality. Firefox 58 also includes a new 2-tiered compiler. The new baseline compiler compiles code 10–15 times faster than the optimizing compiler.
  • Firefox Telemetry Use Counters: Over-estimating usage, now fixed
    Firefox Telemetry records the usage of certain web features via a mechanism called Use Counters. Essentially, for every document that Firefox loads, we record a “false” if the document didn’t use a counted feature, and a “true” if the document did use that counted feature.
  • Firefox 58 new contributors
  • Giving and receiving help at Mozilla
    This is going to sound corny, but helping people really is one of my favorite things at Mozilla, even with projects I have mostly moved on from. As someone who primarily works on internal tools, I love hearing about bugs in the software I maintain or questions on how to use it best. Given this, you might think that getting in touch with me via irc or slack is the fastest and best way to get your issue addressed. We certainly have a culture of using these instant-messaging applications at Mozilla for everything and anything. Unfortunately, I have found that being “always on” to respond to everything hasn’t been positive for either my productivity or mental health. My personal situation aside, getting pinged on irc while I’m out of the office often results in stuff getting lost — the person who asked me the question is often gone by the time I return and am able to answer.
  • Friend of Add-ons: Trishul Goe
    Our newest Friend of Add-ons is Trishul Goel! Trishul first became involved with Mozilla five years when he was introduced to the Firefox OS smartphone. As a JavaScript developer with an interest in Mozilla’s mission, he looked for opportunities to get involved and began contributing to SUMO, L10n, and the Firefox OS Marketplace, where he contributed code and developed and reviewed apps. After Firefox OS was discontinued as a commercial product, Trishul became interested in contributing to Mozilla’s add-ons projects. After landing his first code contributions to addons.mozilla.org (AMO), he set about learning how to develop extensions for Firefox using WebExtensions APIs. Soon, he began sharing his knowledge by leading and mentoring workshops for extension developers as part of Mozilla’s “Build Your Own Extension” Activate campaign.