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Monday, 23 Oct 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat Delivers Cloud Certification Plan, and Teams with HP Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 12:44am
Story Automotive Grade Linux group releases Tizen-based IVI stack Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 12:27am
Story CoreOS Launches Managed Linux Operating System as a Service Rianne Schestowitz 01/07/2014 - 12:23am
Story Android Wear review: the everything inbox Roy Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 9:56pm
Story TI spins Cortex-A9 Sitara SoC Rianne Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 9:54pm
Story digiKam Software Collection 4.1.0 released Rianne Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 9:48pm
Story Linux Mint 17: Fresh and Long-Lasting Rianne Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 9:42pm
Story Peppermint Five Linux Brings the Cloud to Linux Desktop Roy Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 9:36pm
Story CoreOS Linux does away with the upgrade cycle Roy Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 9:32pm
Story Ubuntu phone release date: on track for 2014 launch Roy Schestowitz 30/06/2014 - 9:25pm

Kernel space: Bisection divides users and developers

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: The last couple of years have seen a renewed push within the kernel community to avoid regressions. When a patch is found to have broken something that used to work, a fix must be merged or the offending patch will be removed from the kernel. It's a straightforward and logical idea, but there's one little problem.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • 3x the fun…Triple Monitor Gaming!

  • Create a Logo from the Command Line
  • Wirelessly Sync an iPhone or iPod Touch with Ubuntu
  • Extracting columns and fields from a text file
  • Easy Customization of Firefox With Configuration Mania
  • Getting my wireless card working in Debian
  • Try IRC with Irssi to communicate via chat
  • Functions Vs. Subroutines In Perl And Bash - Palindromes Revisited

Defense wraps up closing argument in Hans Reiser trial

Filed under
Reiser

sfgate.com (AP): The defense attorney for a software programmer accused of killing his estranged wife told jurors Monday the prosecution hasn't proved the woman is dead, let alone murdered.

Media collection software in GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: Around three years ago, when I began my adventure with ‘the penguin’, I had been looking for an application to catalog CDs. They were either ugly, or limited in functionality. This time, I didn’t think of giving up. In the repo I found mainly the old and abandoned (for nearly four years) GTKtalog, CdCat, Kat and Katalog and a program which made me stop for a moment - GWhere.

Hardy Heron reflects Ubuntu Linux ambitions

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Hardy Heron reflects Ubuntu Linux ambitions

  • Ubuntu Linux takes on enterprise server market with new OS
  • Ubuntu 7.10 - Final Review

PCLinuxOS

Filed under
PCLOS

amateurscientist18.blogspot: Its almost an year that I had my first date with PCLinuxOS. I was pretty comfortable with it from day 1. It came well bundled with a host of applications, both Geeky and non-Geeky.

Debian Weekly News - April 21st, 2008

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to the first issue of the Debian Project News, the newsletter for the Debian community! From now on we'll keep you informed about recent events and interesting developments in and around the Debian Community on a biweekly basis. But we could still use some help, so feel free.

An Apple User Tries Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

earthweb.com: I’m an Apple user. Long time, pure bred, never owned anything else. The Macintosh is, without a doubt, one of my favorite things. I reveal my Apple snobbery because I want you to know where I was coming from when I sat down to try Ubuntu, the Linux distro.

Open source applications Keep You Safe

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Personal data safety is big business lately. There are a variety of ways to protect your identity or keep your personal information from the prying eyes of dishonest people, but Eric Wolbrom has what he believes is a unique service. Keep You Safe makes it possible for subscribers to store all their personal data securely in a virtual online "safe deposit box," and share the key with someone they trust.

Upgrades and Compatibility in the Open Source World

Filed under
OSS

ostatic.com: Engineers like to solve new problems. So it should come as no surprise that hardware and software engineers have wrestled for years with the issue of "backward compatibility" -- the idea that new hardware and software should be just like the old hardware and software, only faster, more reliable, and better.

Unlocking The Future: Open Source Opportunities In Custom Systems

Filed under
OSS

crn.com: Custom system builders are among the specialists able to embrace open source as a new prospect for success. Linux's emergence as a completely viable open source operating system has attracted many start-ups on a budget, in addition to a growing recognition by proprietary vendors (and their enterprise and SMB clients) of the benefits of open solutions.

Dragbox bridges command line and desktop

Filed under
Software

linux.com: The GNU/Linux command line and desktop are both sophisticated interfaces, but they are mostly separate realities. You can drag text into a virtual terminal from the desktop, or use Edit -> Copy to move text in either direction, but by default moving files and directories between them is impossible. Dragbox is designed to solve this problem.

Whither the Linux Foundation?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: We live in the age of the spinmeister, the age when language is used more as a means to confuse than to educate, an age when obfuscation is preferred to clarification. I've been wondering what is important - the Foundation itself or the kernel.

Why Microsoft should not lose (and free software will still win)

Filed under
OS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: There has always been a section of the free software community which has an anti-Microsoft agenda. It’s almost like their mission statement is “It’s not over until Microsoft is dead”. Certainly there is a lot of feeling that if Microsoft went away, a lot of our problem would be over. But do Microsoft even need to “lose”; is there even a battle to be fought and if so what would constitute winning it?

New Distro Releases on the Horizon

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Spring is in the air and that can only mean one thing: several popular Linux distributions are getting ready for their next release. Let's take a look at the upcoming versions of Fedora, Ubuntu, and openSUSE to see what's new, what's improved, and what will be worth the wait.

Did Canonical Just Get Punked by Red Hat and Novell?

Filed under
Linux

blog.linuxtoday: My first opinion during all of this hooplah was that why should I care about Red Hat and SUSE Linux not having a consumer desktop line? It doesn't detract from the Linux desktop as a whole (since their business desktop products are doing just fine, thank you), plus let's face it: Ubuntu is kicking butt and taking names. Except I think I may have been wrong.

Also: Red Hat, Novell, Canonical and the free software desktop

Microsoft Office 2007 Fails OOXML Conformance Tests

Filed under
Microsoft

groklaw.net: This takes the cake. Alex Brown has just admitted on his Griffin Brown blog and further to ZDNET UK's Peter Judge that Microsoft Office 2007 has failed two OOXML conformance tests he ran. Color me surprised.

The Trials and Travails of Linux on a Laptop

Filed under
Linux

raiden.net: Over the years I've been slowly working towards getting myself a laptop, but ultimately one thing or another stopped me. But these days you almost can't live without one. So I finally made the plunge. But obviously before I did that I also spent a decent amount of time researching whether or not Linux or Freebsd would work on said laptop before I bought it.

Is it lift off for Linux?

Filed under
Interviews
Ubuntu

bbc.co.uk/blogs: I had a very interesting conversation with Mr Ubuntu, aka Mark Shuttleworth, at the end of last week. His main point was that Linux, and use of Ubuntu, was on the rise. He also had lots of interesting things to say about open source more broadly, the Microsoft-Yahoo deal etc, which I thought I'd detail here as a Q&A.

One last, good look at KDE 3

Filed under
KDE

ericsbinaryworld.com/blog: I initially loved KDE over Gnome. It looked more like Windows, it had more neat options, and great programs. But I left KDE for Gnome for a few reasons. But now I want to look at KDE again because a few things have come together to change some of the reasons why I left KDE.

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PC-MOS/386 is the latest obsolete operating system to open source on Github

PC-MOS/386 was first announced by The Software Link in 1986 and was released in early 1987. It was capable of working on any x86 computer (though the Intel 80386 was its target market). However, some later chips became incompatible because they didn't have the necessary memory management unit. It had a dedicated following but also contained a couple of design flaws that made it slow and/or expensive to run. Add to that the fact it had a Y2K bug that manifested on 31 July 2012, after which any files created wouldn't work, and it's not surprising that it didn't become the gold standard. The last copyright date listed is 1992, although some users have claimed to be using it far longer. Read more

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Linux 4.14-rc6

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