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Sunday, 22 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mandriva 2007 Spring on a Sony Vaio S4XP

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MDV

tuxvaio: As with the installation of SuSE 10.1, installing Mandriva 2007 was frightfully simple. All devices worked with the sole exception of the wireless functionality of the Centrino. This can be fixed by a software download or a inexpensive Linux compatible PC card wireless adapter.

GParted Live CD

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: Partitioning your hard drives is rarely a fun business and oftentimes can be a real pain to do. Thankfully, it’s a lot easier than it used to be to slice up and mess around with your drive.

Weekly tip: killing processes

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine: One of the things I hate about Windows is that there is no good way to kill frozen processes. Theoretically, you type Ctrl-Alt-Delete, wait for Task Manager to pop up, and kill the process. GNU/Linux users don't have this problem. Here's how to end processes using the terminal, a few GUIs, and even a first person shooter.

PCLinuxOS & What Sets it Apart: Part I

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PCLOS

Yet Another Linux Blog: I originally intended this post to be a review of 2007 Final for PCLinuxOS. However, after finishing it up, I realized that posting a review wouldn’t have the desired effect of truly showing off PCLinuxOS to everyone. It would just be a “business as usual” type of post. So, I decided to do a analysis on what I feel sets PCLinuxOS apart from many Linux distributions.

Ubuntu’s User Interface: No Learning Required

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Ubuntu

allaboutubuntu: A few hours after setting up my new Dell Ubuntu PC, my wife jumped onto the system. You know her kind: She is an Apple Mac OS fan who uses Windows — but doesn’t really like Windows. So, how did she do with Linux?

Initial Review of Ubuntu 7.04 on Dell Laptop

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Ubuntu

ITtoolbox Blogs: Recently I found that Dell has partnered with Canonical to offer the latest version of Ubuntu (7.04) with the sale of new Dell computers. (See Dell Sells Computers with Ubuntu & 100th Entry!) This piqued my interest because of the hoops I had to jump through to get my Dell Intel Pro Wireless (IPW) 2200bg card to work with Fedora Core 4. My theory is that Ubuntu 7.04 should be incredibly easy to install and configure on my Dell laptop. So I put my theory to the test.

Creating the GNOME 2.18 Live Media: An interview with Ken VanDine

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Interviews

The Gnome Journal: Paul Cutler interviews Ken VanDine, founder of Foresight Linux, on building images for the recent GNOME 2.18 Live Media release. Ken discusses his goals in helping create new GNOME Live Media, the tools he used in putting the different images together, and his plans for future GNOME Live Media releases.

NVIDIA Graphics: Linux v. Solaris

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Software

Phoronix: At Phoronix we are constantly exploring the different display drivers under Linux, and while we have reviewed Sun's Check Tool and test motherboards with Solaris in addition to covering a few other areas, we have yet to perform a graphics driver comparison between Linux and Solaris. That is until today.

Linux: Kernel Documentation and Translations

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Linux

kernelTRAP: Following a recent patch that translated Documentation/HOWTO into Japanese [story], a new patch offered a translation of the same document into Chinese. Li Yang noted, "Language could be the main obstacle. Hopefully this document will help."

Sharing Internet Connection in Ubuntu

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HowTos

Ubuntu Geek: Setting up a computer to share its internet connection should be easy.After all, you’ve successfully networked your computers together and even shared files with all your home computers, so why not the Internet?

PCLinuxOS 2007 Synaptic Sections – Radically screwed up

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PCLOS

Ye Olde Blogge: Everybody knows PCLinuxOS is radically simple, right? And it is. It's one of the best Live CDs around because it has all the non-free codecs and plugins installed by default, it's easy to install on the harddisk, and it doesn't require much configuration afterwards – unless you are one of those people that like to configure, tweak and personalize their OS to the point of turning it into a new distro.

Setting Up Postfix As A Backup MX

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

In this tutorial I will show how you can set up a Postfix mailserver as a backup mail exchanger for a domain so that it accepts mails for this domain in case the primary mail exchanger is down or unreachable, and passes the mails on to the primary MX once that one is up again.

On Open Source Dying...

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OSS

Yet Another Linux Blog: Let me make it clear for you Michael Hickins of Eweek. Your Article "Is Open Source Dying?" doesn’t even make it into the outer ring of the target for facts. If you were trying to shoot an arrow into the air with this article, you’d miss.

KHTML and CSS 3

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KDE

/home/liquidat: Some days ago someone on slashdot mentioned that the next Opera version is going to pass all CSS 3 tests. While this is great news for Opera I wondered how well konqueror does on this tests.

Linux Shoots for Big League of Servers

Filed under
Linux

WSJ: Linux has had a great run. But to keep the growth, the upstart operating system needs to please more people like Jim Walsh.

10 Things To Do After You Install Ubuntu

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Ubuntu

sheehantu: Ubuntu is a great distro, but it still needs some slight tweaking to get it just right. I’m going to show you how to use Automatix2 to get your OS perfected.

Linux Desktop User's Tips

Filed under
HowTos

itmanagement: These are short and easy things to do which can make your Linux desktop even more convenient than it currently is. Trying Ubuntu out without changing your distribution or creating a new drive partition or installing it on another HD, setting up OpenOffice so ability to read/write Windows Office 2007 word processor documents are what you'll learn how to do today.

Why is Amarok's "Burn This Album" Disabled in Ubuntu?

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HowTos

The How-to-geek: So you are using the killer Amarok music application under Ubuntu, but when you try to "Burn this Album", the menu item is grayed out and otherwise disabled. The reason for this is because Amarok is a KDE application designed to work with K3b.

Installing openSUSE 10.3 Alpha 5

Filed under
SUSE

Notes from the Metaverse: It’s been a little bit of a bumpy ride (but what would you expect with an Alpha release?), but I’m typing from my newly installed Alpha 5 system. Time to share the experience.

Intrusion detection with Snort on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

Filed under
HowTos

searchenterpriselinux: Intrusion detection and intrusion prevention systems (IDS and IPS, respectively) provide the ability to inspect and analyze network traffic and either generate alerts or drop traffic in the event that an attack or a malicious event is detected. We're going to demonstrate how to quickly install and run the open source IDS sensor Snort on Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5 (RHEL 5).

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today's howtos

Ubuntu 16.04.2 LTS Delayed Until February 2, Will Bring Linux 4.8, Newer Mesa

If you've been waiting to upgrade your Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system to the 16.04.2 point release, which should have hit the streets a couple of days ago, you'll have to wait until February 2. We hate to give you guys bad news, but Canonical's engineers are still working hard these days to port all the goodies from the Ubuntu 16.10 (Yakkety Yak) repositories to Ubuntu 16.04 LTS, which is a long-term supported version, until 2019. These include the Linux 4.8 kernel packages and an updated graphics stack based on a newer X.Org Server version and Mesa 3D Graphics Library. Read more

Calamares Release and Adoption

  • Calamares 3.0 Universal Linux Installer Released, Drops Support for KPMcore 2
    Calamares, the open-source distribution-independent system installer, which is used by many GNU/Linux distributions, including the popular KaOS, Netrunner, Chakra GNU/Linux, and recently KDE Neon, was updated today to version 3.0. Calamares 3.0 is a major milestone, ending the support for the 2.4 series, which recently received its last maintenance update, versioned 2.4.6, bringing numerous improvements, countless bug fixes, and some long-anticipated features, including a brand-new PythonQt-based module interface.
  • Due to Popular Request, KDE Neon Is Adopting the Calamares Graphical Installer
    KDE Neon maintainer Jonathan Riddell is announcing today the immediate availability of the popular Calamares distribution-independent Linux installer framework on the Developer Unstable Edition of KDE Neon. It would appear that many KDE Neon users have voted for Calamares to become the default graphical installer system used for installing the Linux-based operating system on their personal computers. Indeed, Calamares is a popular installer framework that's being successfully used by many distros, including Chakra, Netrunner, and KaOS.

Red Hat Financial News