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Sunday, 21 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story OverlayFS Proposed For The Linux 3.18 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 7:39pm
Story Open-spec control oriented SBC builds on RPi COM Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 7:30pm
Story DDOS Attack Brings Tux Machines Down Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 7:26pm
Story NVIDIA Suggests Explicit Synchronization For Nouveau Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 7:20pm
Story What The End-days Of Wintel Looks Like Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 3:34pm
Story Ubuntu GNOME Devs Encouraged by Ubuntu Team to Add Latest GNOME in Future Versions Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 3:24pm
Story Spanish anti tax fraud unit renews Linux contract Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 3:19pm
Story Building a Linux lab and its great potential in education Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 3:14pm
Story LibreSSL: More Than 30 Days Later Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 3:08pm
Story Black Lab Linux 6.0 Beta 2 Is a Bizarrely Attractive Xfce Desktop Rianne Schestowitz 29/09/2014 - 3:04pm

Bill Gates vs. Linus Torvalds: Who has a bigger ego?

Filed under
OS

junauza.com: If you are Bill Gates or Linus Torvalds, it is totally understandable to have an ego the size of the biggest planet. The two has been known to make comments that will forever keep the geek pride alive. If you want proof, just read the following quotes.

Open source still the best way to develop software

Filed under
OSS

practical-tech.com: The open-source way of creating programs is still the best way, just don’t confuse it with being the perfect way — there’s no such thing.

Ubuntu Puts Big Emphasis on Small PCs at OSCON

Filed under
Ubuntu

pcworld.com: This week at OSCON, the annual open-source conference in Portland, Oregon, Canonical is showing off a new version of its Ubuntu Linux operating system that's designed specifically for Intel Atom-based Netbook PCs. Ubuntu Netbook Remix and Mobile Internet Device editions of Linux are gearing up to compete with Windows.

Dictators in free and open source software

Filed under
OSS

freesoftwaremagazine.com: Some people seem to challenge the idea that most (if not all) free software projects need a benevolent dictator—that is, somebody who has the last say on every decision. They are quick to point out Linus Torvalds’ past “mistakes” (see the brackets): using BitKeeper to manage the kernel, not allowing “pluggable” schedulers in Linux, etc. As a software developer, I feel that a dictator is absolutely necessary in every free software project. Here is why.

Exactly who, is Linux for?

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: Is Linux for everyone? Is Linux destined to be the Great Replacement? Will Linux ever reach billions on billions of installs in the world? Not likely. If Linux isn't for everyone, then who is it for?

Gaming on Ubuntu (Linux)

Filed under
Gaming

look2linux.com: From browsing the site I found that we get a lot of comments here that say things like “I am not switching to Linux because then I can’t play my games!” and “Ubuntu sucks because I can’t play games!”. Well, here is the thing… you can. There are tonnes and tonnes of games out there for you to try and play. There are even sites and programs dedicated to getting your windows games up and running.

Nvidia on KDE 4.1: a greedy problem

Filed under
KDE
Software

liquidat.wordpress: KDE 4.1 was released as a RC recently and will soon be released. While it will be a very usable and stable desktop environment ready to be used almost everywhere most users with NVIDIA cards will not be pleased: their proprietary driver spoil the fun.

Why windows why??

Filed under
Microsoft

it.toolbox.com/blogs: Rant mode on. Why does windows make it so difficult to transfer settings? Why does windows go out of its way to be incompatible with itself? Why is windows purposely designed to make our lives a nightmare? Why can't I take a windows hard disk out of one machine and put it in another and have it work? Why?

Mark Shuttleworth: life on mars, Ubuntu in emerging markets

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica.com: After the technical sessions concluded, some OSCON attendees headed across town to see Mark Shuttleworth, the charismatic founder of the Ubuntu Linux distribution, give a presentation to local Portland group Legion of Tech.

Why Linux is Not on the Desktop

Filed under
Linux

blogcritics.org: Let me start by saying that I love Linux. So when I saw the site Why Linux is Better, I was kind of nodding my head in agreement to many of its reasons. But then I thought about it:

IBM nears a decade of Linux and open source

Filed under
OSS

techtarget.com: After nearly a decade of active involvement in open source, IBM's commitment to Linux is broad and deep, said Inna Kuznetsova, the director of IBM Linux strategy – a sentiment shared by most, though not all, IBM observers.

what is KDE?

Filed under
KDE

chani.wordpress: whenever people ask me that question, I have trouble answering. what is KDE? it’s not just a desktop environment any more, not by a long shot. it’s a whole universe of software projects (one of which is a desktop environment).

Kernel Log: No unstable series; Linux 2008.7; dealing with security fixes

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: Along with 2.6.27 development ramping up, there is a variety of other Linux kernel news. Shortly after the release of Linux 2.6.26, someone on the Linux Kernel Mailing List (LKML) asked what sort of changes – either potentially or already in the works – might give rise to a 2.7 development series.

Macedonia and Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

aidworkerdaily.com: A few weeks ago, while my wife was still in Macedonia, I asked her to install Ubuntu. Shortly after returning to the States my wife called her father and asked him if he had a minute so that she could explain to him how to get online. His response was, “Don’t worry about it. I figured it out on my own.”

Debian Project News - July 21st, 2008

Filed under
Linux

debian.org: Welcome to this year's 7th issue of DPN, the newsletter for the Debian community. Some of the topics covered in this issue: Updates to the Lenny release process, Debian-installer to support loading of external firmwares, Best practice for debug packages, ... and much more.

Embedding Python In Apache2 With mod_python (Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora/CentOS, Mandriva, OpenSUSE)

Filed under
MDV
SUSE
Ubuntu
HowTos

This tutorial shows how to install and use mod_python on various distributions (Debian/Ubuntu, Fedora/CentOS, Mandriva, OpenSUSE) with Apache2. mod_python is an Apache module that embeds the Python interpreter within the server.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Openmoko Inks a Distribution Deal

  • Novell SUSE Linux beats out Red Hat on cost at life sciences firm
  • AMD Catalyst 8.7 Linux Driver Released
  • Create Tomboy notes in Firefox with Tomfox
  • Weekly Mix Of Everything Linux
  • Seneca College teams with FOSS projects for hands-on learning
  • Options and Tools For OpenOffice.org. Users
  • Linux as a Hypervisor
  • openSUSE Kernel Bug Squashing Day on Wednesday, July 30
  • How To Create Or Edit Fonts In Ubuntu Hardy Heron
  • Ubuntu for business

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Patching denyhosts to allow correct plugin reporting

  • Colourful man pages in Ubuntu
  • Part 1: Building a Secure & Redundant Intranet Server With Gentoo - Apache - PHP5 - MySQL
  • Fancy Globbing With Zsh On Linux and Unix
  • Short tip: Simple .vimrc lines
  • Tweaking the Eee PC part 4
  • Add 7z (7-Zip) File Archive Support to Ubuntu
  • That edgy chroot can go … oops!
  • Running a webcam on Linux
  • Linux and Lumix digital cameras
  • Bash User Input Validation

Free and Open Source Software vs. Cloud Computing

Filed under
OSS

earthweb.com: Maybe I'm missing something, but I don't see the point of proprietary network services (or cloud computing, or Software as a Service, if you prefer). Not when you have Free software as an alternative (“Free,” in this case, being analogous to open source or GNU/Linux).

FSF organizes against Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Nobody knows yet what the Anti-Counterfeiting Trade Agreement (ACTA) will consist of, but the few available indications are so ominous that the Free Software Foundation (FSF) has started a campaign to raise public awareness of the possibilities.

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More in Tux Machines

KaOS 2018.01 KDE-focused Linux distro now available with Spectre and Meltdown fixes

It can be difficult to find a quality Linux distribution that meets your needs. This is partly because there are just too many operating systems from which to choose. My suggestion is to first find a desktop environment that you prefer, and then narrow down your distro search to one that focuses on that DE. For instance, if you like KDE, both Kubuntu and Netrunner are solid choices. With all of that said, there is another KDE-focused Linux distro that I highly recommend. Called "KaOS," it is rolling release, meaning you can alway be confident that your computer is running modern packages. Today, KaOS gets its first updated ISO for 2018, and you should definitely use it to upgrade your install media. Why? Because version 2018.01 has fixes for Spectre and Meltdown thanks to Linux kernel 4.14.14 with both AMD and Intel ucode. Read more

Today in Techrights

KDE: Linux and Qt in Automotive, KDE Discover, Plasma5 18.01 in Slackware

  • Linux and Qt in Automotive? Let’s meet up!
    For anyone around the Gothenburg area on Feb 1st, you are most welcome to the Automotive MeetUp held at the Pelagicore and Luxoft offices. There will be talks about Qt/QML, our embedded Linux platform PELUX and some ramblings about open source in automotive by yours truly ;-)
  • What about AppImage?
    I see a lot of people asking about state of AppImage support in Discover. It’s non-existent, because AppImage does not require centralized software management interfaces like Discover and GNOME Software (or a command-line package manager). AppImage bundles are totally self-contained, and come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and can be managed on the filesystem using your file manager This should sound awfully familiar to former Mac users (like myself), because Mac App bundles are totally self-contained, come straight from the developer with zero middlemen, and are managed using the Finder file manager.
  • What’s new for January? Plasma5 18.01, and more
    When I sat down to write a new post I noticed that I had not written a single post since the previous Plasma 5 announcement. Well, I guess the past month was a busy one. Also I bought a new e-reader (the Kobo Aura H2O 2nd edition) to replace my ageing Sony PRS-T1. That made me spend a lot of time just reading books and enjoying a proper back-lit E-ink screen. What I read? The War of the Flowers by Tad Williams, A Shadow all of Light by Fred Chappell, Persepolis Rising and several of the short stories (Drive, The Butcher of Anderson Station, The Churn and Strange Dogs) by James SA Corey and finally Red Sister by Mark Lawrence. All very much worth your time.

GNU/Linux: Live Patching, Gravity of Kubernetes, Welcome to 2018

  • How Live Patching Has Improved Xen Virtualization
    The open-source Xen virtualization hypervisor is widely deployed by enterprises and cloud providers alike, which benefit from the continuous innovation that the project delivers. In a video interview with ServerWatch, Lars Kurth, Chairman of the Xen Project Advisory Board and Director, Open Source Solutions at Citrix, details some of the recent additions to Xen and how they are helping move the project forward.
  • The Gravity of Kubernetes
    Most new internet businesses started in the foreseeable future will leverage Kubernetes (whether they realize it or not). Many old applications are migrating to Kubernetes too. Before Kubernetes, there was no standardization around a specific distributed systems platform. Just like Linux became the standard server-side operating system for a single node, Kubernetes has become the standard way to orchestrate all of the nodes in your application. With Kubernetes, distributed systems tools can have network effects. Every time someone builds a new tool for Kubernetes, it makes all the other tools better. And it further cements Kubernetes as the standard.
  • Welcome to 2018
    The image of the technology industry as a whole suffered in 2017, and that process is likely to continue this year as well. That should lead to an increased level of introspection that will certainly affect the free-software community. Many of us got into free software to, among other things, make the world a better place. It is not at all clear that all of our activities are doing that, or what we should do to change that situation. Expect a lively conversation on how our projects should be run and what they should be trying to achieve. Some of that introspection will certainly carry into projects related to machine learning and similar topics. There will be more interesting AI-related free software in 2018, but it may not all be beneficial. How well will the world be served, for example, by a highly capable, free facial-recognition system and associated global database? Our community will be no more effective than anybody else at limiting progress of potentially freedom-reducing technologies, but we should try harder to ensure that our technologies promote and support freedom to the greatest extent possible. Our 2017 predictions missed the fact that an increasing number of security problems are being found at the hardware level. We'll not make the same mistake in 2018. Much of what we think of as "hardware" has a great deal of software built into it — highly proprietary software that runs at the highest privilege levels and which is not subject to third-party review. Of course that software has bugs and security issues of its own; it couldn't really be any other way. We will see more of those issues in 2018, and many of them are likely to prove difficult to fix.