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Monday, 20 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story What’s a Linux Distro and How Are They Different? srlinuxx 15/01/2013 - 5:13pm
Story The comeback of Elive srlinuxx 15/01/2013 - 5:10pm
Story Peculiar Games Being Ported To Linux srlinuxx 15/01/2013 - 2:59am
Story RIP, Aaron Swartz srlinuxx 15/01/2013 - 2:52am
Story Fedora 18 finally to be released with game-changing features srlinuxx 14/01/2013 - 11:35pm
Story Best Movie Collection Managers For Linux srlinuxx 14/01/2013 - 10:44pm
Story How Forking Perl 5 Could Work srlinuxx 14/01/2013 - 10:41pm
Story How to Overcome Common Ubuntu Hassles srlinuxx 14/01/2013 - 10:30pm
Story Fedora 17 Xfce Spin Review - eXtremely eXcellent srlinuxx 14/01/2013 - 10:28pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 490 srlinuxx 14/01/2013 - 7:38pm

desktop zooming

Filed under
KDE

Aaron Seigo: our three level desktop zooming is now working in plasma. wee! the idea is this: plasmoids (launchers, icons, widgets, games, mini-apps, etc) exist in groups. a group can be displayed to take up the full area of the screen. when you zoom out, you see these various groups and the plasmoids within them shrink to mere icons.

Ingimp's tools may improve FOSS usability

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Since May, ingimp, a modified version of the GIMP, has collected daily logs on what users do with the program in the hope of improving its usability. What ingimp is really designed to do is develop the software and practices to put free and open source software usability testing on a professional footing "without placing an undue burden on either the developers or users."

hardinfo on Fedora

Filed under
Software

liquidat: I just discovered hardinfo in the Fedora repositories while I was checking for some data about my own packages and was curious what the program is capable of. And judging from the first looks the tool is indeed very helpful.

stellarium, A real-time realistic planetarium

Filed under
Software

linux by example: Stellarium is an education tools for those who enjoy astronomy. Stellarium present you the starry sky in different period of time, different locations and different directions in 3D.

Installation of Google Earth on the Inspiron E1505N

Filed under
Software

about.com: Today I installed and test drove the latest version of Google Earth on my Dell Inspiron E1505 running Ubuntu 7.04 (Feisty Fawn). The process was remarkably pleasant and straight-forward.

Easing Configuration with Java

Filed under
News

Configuration can be a maintenance mess and add to a developer's burden. This article introduces a framework with which developers can define their application's configuration in terms of high-level interface.

Ten commandments for Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

Matt Asay: I ended my presentation by suggesting that the Ubuntu community "make Ubuntu better, not simply a clone of yesterday's mistakes." To get there, I warned Canonical/Ubuntu to:

AWN Applet Dialog test case

Filed under
Software

aarobone: Here's a quick video of my first test case of a "Topaz" style dialog in my AWN Monitor applet. I had to create a patch for the core AWN codebase in order to get the position tracking stuff to work...its not perfect but it works.

OSI Approves New Open-Source License

Filed under
OSS

eWeek: The Open Source Initiative approved on July 25 its first new license in quite some time: the Common Public Attribution License, which is essentially the Mozilla Public License with a new attribution clause.

What Do We Really Want From Linux?

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: In my last blog post about the real-world cost of Linux, I was struck by the contrast between my words and fellow InformationWeek blogger Alexander Wolfe’s take on all this. He’s lamented the broad variety of distributions out there, and found fault with the way those who create Linux distributions seem unwilling to accept what users really want.

GPL whiz Moglen nails Web 2.0 O'Reilly on 'frivolous' charges

Filed under
OSS

the register: O'Reilly invited Free Software Foundation lawyer Eben Moglen to participate in a discussion about "licensing in the Web 2.0 era" at this week's OSCON. The conference organizers did their best to fix the conversation. Even though everyone laughs at O'Reilly's Web 2.0 moniker to his face, the conference promoter still takes the phrase very seriously and expects others to do the same.

So You Want to Be a Linux Developer - Part 1

Filed under
OSS

Linux Insider: Are you driving progress forward? Are you presenting papers educating your peers at open source events? Can you write papers explaining what you do and how to use your code? Do you participate in a wide variety of activities that enhance open source? Those things are all important to consider and something the Linux Foundation looks at closely.

Linux Bible 2007 Edition: Install/Run 10+ GNU/Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

Every Flavor Bean: The Wiley book, Linux Bible - 2007 Edition, by Christopher Negus, the author of popular book Red Hat Linux Bible, got at least one thing right: it gives the reader an option to select one of many GNU/Linux distributions available today according to his or her requirements/taste.

A first look at Tracker 0.6.0

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: Tracker 0.6.0 was released earlier this week. The latest version of the open source search and indexing system includes an assortment of long-awaited features. I tested Tracker 0.6.0 on my desktop computer, which runs Ubuntu 7.04.

On Debian Maintainers

Filed under
Linux

No Title: I suppose most of our New Maintainers will aim to become a Debian Maintainer just to bridge the time until they’re full Debian Developers. And I predict that this is also the major target audience for this new Debian Maintainers class.

Fuzz testing with zzuf

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Fuzz testing, which uses random input to test software for bugs, has been the biggest thing to happen in IT security in quite awhile. Now you can quickly and easily direct your own fuzz testing ops, thanks to a cool little program called zzuf.

Virtual Hosting With PureFTPd And MySQL On CentOS 5.0

Filed under
HowTos

This document describes how to install a PureFTPd server that uses virtual users from a MySQL database instead of real system users. This is much more performant and allows to have thousands of ftp users on a single machine.

The inadvertent Linux user

Filed under
Linux

ITPro: While Linux is still taking off relatively slowly in the desktop world, the same is not true in the mobile space where many are predicting that we will be presented with a mobile Linux Odyssey in 2012.

Jim Zemlin touts the 'second phase' of Linux

Filed under
Linux
Interviews

computerworld: In January, two of the most established Linux and open-source advocacy groups, the Open Source Development Lab and the Free Standards Group, merged, forming the San Francisco-based Linux Foundation. Yesterday, Zemlin spoke with Computerworld at the Ubuntu Live Conference, discussing what his group will focus on as Linux and other open-source applications continue to be embraced by corporate IT departments.

Linux: It's Not Just for Servers Anymore

Filed under
Linux

wired.com: After years of being relegated to server racks and the desktops of ultrageeks, Linux is finally making some headway as a viable alternative to Windows on the consumer desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop GNU/Linux/Chromebook

  • A Minimal Chrome OS Theme for Tint2
    I used to (and sort-of-still-do, I guess) run a sister site focused on Google Chrome, Chromecast and Chromebooks, i.e. the Chrome ecosystem. As such I am a fan of Chromebooks and Chrome OS, a Linux-based distribution based on Gentoo. The appearance of Chrome OS has waxed and waned in sync with Google’s ambitions and positioning for the OS, going form hyper-minimal to a full desktop clone (with the desktop-y Chrome Apps platform) through to a Material Design inspired Android + Chrome hybrid today.
  • Off-The-Shelf Hacker: Linux for Cheap Hardware, Then and Now
    Most people, don’t realize how prolific Linux has become. With the Embedded Linux Conference just a week away, I’ve been reflecting on how Linux has provided a sort of computing “circle of life” experience for me. It’s powered my computational hardware 20 years ago and continues to do so today.
  • [Video] XPS 13 Review | Linux Action Show 457
  • GParted 0.28.1
    This release of GParted restores the ability to move/resize primary partitions when an extended partition exists. The move/resize regression was introduced in version 0.28.0. This release also includes some minor bug fixes.
  • Antergos Linux : The beauty built on Arch
    Hi guys, welcome to the 16th segment of "Introduction with Linux Distro". Most of us know or heard about Arch Linux, which is one of the most widely used Linux distribution. For some reason, few users find it hard to install and use Arch. But in Linux world, there is almost always some alternative to your desired distribution. In today's segment, we will be introducing an Arch-based distribution which turned it completely on user-friendly side. So, let's get to know about Antergos Linux.

Kernel Space/Linux

Leftovers: Software

  • Picard 1.4 released
    The last time we put out a stable release was more than 2 years ago, so a lot of changes have made it into this new release. If you’re in a hurry and just want to try it out, the downloads are available from the Picard website.
  • Linux Digital Audio Workstations: Open Source Music Production
    Linux Digital Audio Workstations When most people think of music programs, they’ll usually think Mac OS or Windows. However, there are also a few Linux digital audio workstations. The support and features of these programs can vary, but they’re a good choice to setup a cheap recording studio. Some of them are even good competitors for paid programs, offering features such as multitrack recording, MIDI, and virtual instruments. Keep in mind that many audio editing programs for Linux rely on the Jack backend. You’ll need a dedicated system to install these programs on, since it doesn’t work properly in a virtual machine. In the following article, we’ll cover audio editing programs that are available for Linux. We’ll talk about the available features, as well as help you decide which program to use for your needs.
  • i2pd 2.12 released
    i2pd (I2P Daemon) is a full-featured C++ implementation of I2P client. I2P (Invisible Internet Protocol) is a universal anonymous network layer. All communications over I2P are anonymous and end-to-end encrypted, participants don't reveal their real IP addresses.
  • 4 Command-Line Graphics Tools for Linux
    For the most part, they’re wrong. Command-line image tools do much of what their GUI counterparts can, and they can do it just as well. Sometimes, especially when dealing with multiple image files or working on an older computer, command-line tools can do a better job. Let’s take a look at four command-line tools that can ably handle many of your basic (and not-so-basic) image manipulation tasks.
  • CloudStats - Best Server Monitoring Tool for Linux Servers
    CloudStats is an effective tool for Linux server monitoring and network monitoring. With CloudStats you get whole visibility into key performance criteria of your Linux Server. You can proactively track different server metrics like CPU, disk and memory usage, services, apps, processes and more. The best thing is that you don’t need to have any special technical skills – this tool for server monitoring is very easy to install and run from any device.
  • New Inkscape 0.92.1 fixes your previous works done with Inkscape
    This blog-post is about a happy-end after a previously published blog-post named New Inkscape 0.92 breaks your previous works done with Inkscape published on 20 January. A lot of reactions did happen about this previous blog-post and the news get quickly viral. That's why I thought it was nice to make another blog post to "close this case".
  • Qt 5.10 To Have Built-In Vulkan Support
    With Qt 5.8 there was experimental Direct3D 12 support that left some disappointed the toolkit didn't opt for supporting Vulkan first as a cross-platform, high-performance graphics API. Fortunately, with Qt 5.10, there will be built-in Vulkan support. Going back nearly one year there has been Vulkan work around Qt while with Qt 5.10 it's becoming a reality. However, with Qt 5.9 not even being released until the end of May, Qt 5.10 isn't going to officially debut until either the very end of 2017 or early 2018.
  • Rusty Builder
    Thanks to Georg Vienna, Builder can now manage your Rust installations using RustUp!
  • GNOME MPlayer knows how to grow your playlist size

today's howtos