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Sunday, 22 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Linux Mint 17.1 Xfce released Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 9:35pm
Story Android Leftovers Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 7:40pm
Story SlimPort Nano-Console Brings Android to Big Screens Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 7:33pm
Story VW shows Android Auto in car system at CES 2015 Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 7:28pm
Story CES 2015: LG announces G Flex 2 with improved specs and user experience Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 7:26pm
Story Do You Work in the Data Center? Here Are Three Open Source Projects You Need to Know About Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 5:54pm
Story LibreCalc, The 3D Printed Linux Calculator Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 5:52pm
Story FreeBSD Finishes Switching Over To GNOME 3.x Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 12:25pm
Story Nope. Munich Never Happened. – Deny, Deny, and Deny Some More Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 12:21pm
Story KDE Frameworks 5.1 & Plasma 2.1 – First Impressions Roy Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 12:08pm

How Linux Helped Chickens, Environmentalists, and a Pirate

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: I’ve worked with a Japanese company called Plat’Home, maker of small, tough, eco-friendly servers, for the past nine months or so. They ran a contest this summer about ideas. They called it the “Will Linux Work? Contest.” They collected ideas from Linux lovers on how they would use Linux in interesting and sometimes challenging ways.

Hell freezes over: Ballmer considering open-source browser

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

cnet.com: I fully expected to die never having heard a positive word escape Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer's lips with regard to open source. Based on Ballmer's comments made in Sydney on Friday, however, it may be time for me to start picking out my funeral arrangements.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Why Microsoft fears Linux

  • What Outsourcers Can Learn from Open-Source Communities
  • Fedora 10 preview release shines like a star
  • Is Sun taking open source a little too far?
  • Open Sources Episode 2: This time we pay attention
  • Follow The Netbook Road
  • Netbook conundrum -- Windows or Linux?
  • Sun still radiating open source
  • Fork you very much: Gist brings revision tracking to pastes
  • Road-Tripping With Linux
  • DRM firmware adopted by mobile Linux stack
  • OIN: Making the world 'safe for Linux'
  • New critical vulnerabilities in VLC media player
  • Debian Linux
  • Decided to stay on Ubuntu 8.04
  • Mandriva Testcases
  • The Case for a New Open Source License
  • Dell Inspiron Mini 9 battery consumption test
  • Kiss Firefox EULA goodbye
  • At ApacheCon, Microsoft jumps on open source bandwagon

10 Cool Linux Apps You Maybe Didn’t Know About

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Ubuntu comes pre-installed with a wealth of apps - covering almost every task you need to do, while still managing to fit on a CD. Are you ready to discover some pretty cool apps that don’t get the attention they deserve? Let’s check them out.

GNU/Linux is user-friendly - and logical too

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Over at iTWire, we are often in the position where we disagree with a fellow writer and say so. This morning, I found my colleague Davey Winder's piece "Opinion: why Linux sucks at being user friendly" to be a litle too general to pass without comment.

some howtos & such:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Comparison of Python virtual machines

  • What to do if every kernel update break your bootloader settings
  • auto-apt : on-demand package installer
  • 3 More Things Every Good Linux Adminstrator Knows
  • Automatically mount encrypted filesystems at login with pam_mount
  • Tables in OpenOffice.org Impress: New and Unstylish
  • Why Firefox Rocks on Linux: Great Firefox Tricks, Part III
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux
  • More Quick Ways To Find CPU Bottlenecks On Linux

Amarok Insider - Issue 13 Released

Filed under
Software

kde.org: Issue 13 of Amarok Insider, the official Amarok newsletter is out. It discusses the evolution of Amarok's interface, reveals the release plans, covers some of the biggest features of the upcoming version 2.0, and much more. Download links for Windows and OS X versions of the Amarok 2.0 beta are included.

Fluxbox - Why You Might Want to Try It

Filed under
Fluxbox

fosswire.com: When you think about desktop environments on Linux/Unix, you’ll probably think GNOME and KDE. Rather than using an integrated suite of programs, you can simply use a standalone window manager and then just run any of the apps you want. Fluxbox is such a window manager.

Wi-Fi Linux network bug found, fixed

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: These days, most of us can use our Wi-Fi cards on Linux using native drivers. Some of us, though, are still stuck with using Windows drivers on Linux. This kludge is usually done by using the Windows driver with NDISwrapper. Unfortunately, it's recently been discovered that there's a crack in the kludge.

IBM Lotus Adds Mac OS X, Ubuntu Linux Support To Symphony Apps

Filed under
Software

crn.com: Expanding its efforts to offer an alternative to Microsoft's Office desktop applications, IBM is making its free Lotus Symphony office productivity suite available for Apple's Mac OS X and Canonical's Ubuntu Linux.

Creative Gives In, They Open-Source Their X-Fi Driver

Filed under
OSS

phoronix.com: The Sound Blaster X-Fi sound card driver for Linux from Creative Labs was awful. That's simply the nicest way to put it. However, Creative Labs today has finally turned this situation around and they have open-sourced the code to this notorious driver.

Collabora funds development of open source video editor PiTiVi

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Open source multimedia specialist Collabora is hiring developers to work on the nonlinear video editor PiTiVi. The Cambridge, UK-based company contributes heavily to the GStreamer media framework and other GStreamer-dependent projects, so PiTiVi is a natural fit -- and it fills a sorely needed niche on the Linux desktop.

openSUSE 11.1 countdown

Filed under
SUSE

dev-loki.blogspot: The openSUSE release countdown banners have been updated, with new languages (pt_BR, hu, id, bg, jp and wa) as well as counting down to 11.1. And as it is rendered on the server, it always points to the right number of remaining days before 11.1 release.

More Work On Red Hat's Wayland Project

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Since publishing the world's first look at Wayland, a nano display server for Linux with an integrated compositing manager, there has been much interest in this emerging Red Hat project. While this project is still in its infancy, below are a few more notes about recent changes with Wayland.

Will Linux ever be a mainstream desktop play?

Filed under
Linux

cnet.com: I strongly suspect that there are inherent tradeoffs between the flexibility and choice associated with open source and the unified approach (epitomized by Apple) that tends to be associated with good user interface design. But the bigger issue with mainstreaming the Linux PC has nothing to do with design and everything with where we are in technology history.

No More Doom And Gloom, Please

Filed under
Linux

linuxcanuck.wordpress: It seems that more and more bloggers are writing doom and gloom articles or attention grabbing headlines to that effect. Recently one blogger has taken it upon himself to write about the virtues of Windows 7 and make pronouncements that it will kill Linux on netbooks and “instant on” computers. Others write that the success of Ubuntu will kill other distros and poses a threat to Linux as a whole. I say, enough already.

Why Linux sucks at being user friendly

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: Forget the OS wars, Apple and Microsoft do not need to wield any weapons today. Linux seems to be doing a good enough job of shooting itself in the foot when it comes to appealing to your average PC user.

Mac OS X 10.5 vs. Ubuntu 8.10 Benchmarks

Filed under
Linux

phoronix.com: Last week we published Ubuntu 7.04 to 8.10 benchmarks from a Lenovo ThinkPad T60 and had found Ubuntu's performance degraded peculiarly over the past year and a half. This time around we're switching out the hardware we're testing on to Intel's newer Core 2 series and we're comparing the performance of the x86 and x86_64 editions of Ubuntu 8.10 against Apple's Mac OS X 10.5.5.

The Future of Gnome

Filed under
Software

workswithu.com: Neil Patel of Canonical recently posted an outline of the new user interface concepts that Gnome developers envisioned during the “Gnome User Experience” conference in Boston a couple of weeks ago. But are the concepts a good move?

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Ryzen 7 2700X CPUFreq Scaling Governor Benchmarks On Ubuntu Linux

With this week's Ryzen 5 2600X + Ryzen 7 2700X benchmarks some thought the CPUFreq scaling driver or rather its governors may have been limiting the performance of these Zen+ CPUs, so I ran some additional benchmarks this weekend. Those launch-day Ryzen 5 2600X / Ryzen 7 2700X Ubuntu Linux benchmarks were using the "performance" governor, but some have alleged that the performance governor may now actually hurt AMD systems... Ondemand, of course, is the default CPUFreq governor on Ubuntu and most other Linux distributions. Some also have said the "schedutil" governor that makes use of the kernel's scheduler utilization data may do better on AMD. So I ran some extra benchmarks while changing between CPUFreq's ondemand (default), performance (normally the best for performance, and what was used in our CPU tests), schedutil (the newest option), and powersave (if you really just care about conserving power). Read more