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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 21 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 6 new things Fedora 21 brings to the open source cloud Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 10:02am
Story New focus on open-source software for SMEs Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 10:00am
Story SDN, IoT, Drones on the Menu for the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 9:41am
Story Latest NORKS Linux and Android distros leak Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 9:41am
Story Linus Tells Wired Leap Second Irrelevant Rianne Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 8:57am
Story The year Linux invaded CES: 5 major Linux appearances at CES 2015 Rianne Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 8:55am
Story Linux-enabled smart fridge invites cool accessory designs Rianne Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 12:20am
Story Ubuntu GNOME 15.04 Finally Gets GNOME 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 12:10am
Story Wine Announcement Rianne Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 12:04am
Story Big names like Google dominate open-source funding Rianne Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 11:58pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Keep Track of Your Time with Hamster Applet

  • Super Grub Disk To The Rescue
  • List Open Files
  • Using dnsmasq for DNS and DHCP services
  • Recover Deleted Files From Your Linux System
  • Folding@Home on Ubuntu
  • conquer your file associations in kde
  • Recover grub bootloader with Vista, Xp and Linux
  • A Few Ways To Gauge Possible Memory Bottlenecks In SUSE Linux

Diebold faces GPL infringement lawsuit over voting machines

Filed under
OSS
Legal

arstechnica.com: Artifex Software, the company behind the open source Ghostscript PDF processing software, has filed a lawsuit against voting machine vendor Diebold and its subsidiary Premier Election Solutions. Artifex says that Diebold violated the GPL by incorporating Ghostscript into commercial electronic voting machine systems.

Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5.3 beta boosts virtualization capabilities

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Raleigh, N.C.-based Red Hat Inc.has introduced the beta of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 5.3, which includes improvements in virtualization, clustering and file systems, along with support for the latest hardware drivers.

Funtoo: Metro 1.1 Released

Filed under
Gentoo

blog.funtoo.org: I’ve just released version 1.1 of Metro and updated the QuickStart Guide to reflect this new version.

TV-B-Gone: Not Your Average Open Source Success Story

Filed under
Hardware

ostatic.com: There is an interesting story regarding open source hardware making the rounds today. Have you ever heard of TV-B-Gone?

Beta 3 of Amarok 2.0 released

Filed under
Software

kde.org: The Amarok team announces the third beta release of Amarok 2.0, codename Ataksak. It includes a database importer for users of Amarok 1.4, who want to keep their statistics and ratings, as well as a lot of bugfixes and improvements.

Mandriva appoints Hervé Yahi as Chairman – Chief Executive Officer

Filed under
MDV

mandriva.com (PR): Mandriva, the leading European Linux publisher, today announced the appointment of Hervé Yahi as Chairman – CEO.

Linux Desktop Education Deployments Planned in 29 US States

Filed under
Linux

linuxpr.com (PR): Omni and Userful today announced that over 50 academic institutions from 29 US States and 10 countries worldwide have signed up to deploy Multi-station SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktops through the "Free the Penguins" education initiative.

GNUveau Networks builds solar-powered Linux computer networks

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Scott Johnson of GNUveau Networks has developed a solar-powered Internet "hub" system (running Ubuntu GNU/Linux) that he builds to order in his Daytona Beach, Florida, home. His objective is to bring computers and the Internet to places that have no connectivity, no phone service, and no electricity.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 277

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: An overview of Ubuntu editions

  • News: Fedora unveils Plymouth, Sugar spin, Sabayon hints at major new features, Yellow Dog launches beta testing, NetBSD prepares to branch 5.0, CrossOver Linux
  • Released last week: Ubuntu 8.10, OpenBSD 4.4
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 10 Preview, Ubuntu 9.04 release schedule
  • Donations: GoblinX receives US$250
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

some shorts

Filed under
Linux
  • Gentoo: USE=kerberos removed from the default profiles

  • Linux Void: Episode 11 - Hawking Pumpkins
  • (Poll) Which OS do you prefer?
  • How to install latest Amarok and digikam in Fedora 9

Is Ubuntu's Popularity Endangering the Linux Ecosystem?

Filed under
Linux
Ubuntu

junauza.com: After I have read iTWire's recent article entitled "Is Ubuntu killing other distributions?" I remembered asking myself the same question when I noticed how Ubuntu is taking over the Linux world.

IPv6 in Linux

linuxdevices.com: This article discusses the advantages of IPv6, which in addition to a larger address space promises to increase standby time in devices, and improve performance in routers. It discusses IPv6 technology, as well as how IPv6 has been implemented in the Linux kernel.

Ubuntu Intrepid Ibex raises the bar

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux.com: Each new Ubuntu release has raised the standard by which other Linux distros are judged. With the new Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex, the focus is on mobility and 3G network support. I found Intrepid to be a fast and stable release, yet I experienced some minor issues that keep it from absolute perfection.

Ubuntu disappointment and data disasters

pcpro.co.uk/blogs: Ubuntu 8.10 made its appearence this week, and while everybody was busy touting the network manager’s new-fangled ability to handle mobile broadband connections, what nobody seemed to be mentioning was that it doesn’t actually work very well.

States Stand Aside as Open Source Bandwagon Rolls By

technewsworld.com: While some state governments have explored the idea of using open source software in their systems, the same gripes continue to hold back its adoption: Quality, compatibility and security. Some states make use of open source, but all stop short of mandating its use.

Open source Ogg Theora video codec completes beta phase

Filed under
Software

heise-online.co.uk: After a one year beta phase, the Xiph Foundation's free Ogg Theora video codec has been released in its final, "mainline", version 1.0. Rather than redesigning the open source compression algorithm from scratch, Xiph.org worked on enhancing the "Truemotion VP3.2" codec released under an open source licence by On2 Technologies.

Compiz Fusion News: Tons of new developments!

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress: The Compiz Fusion Community News for Nov 4, 2008 is now available. Topics include Improved startup time for compiz, Compiz 0.7.8 released, and Three new plugins.

OpenOffice 3.0 - the only option for masochistic Linux users

Filed under
OOo

theregister.co.uk: In a brilliant execution of public relations, OpenOffice.org 3.0 was released without enough capacity to handle the demand for downloads. Servers buckled under the traffic, and some of us in the media took the bait. Are people really getting that excited over an open source productivity suite?

What's up with the GNOME Linux Desktop?

Filed under
Software

internetnews.com: It takes money and it takes new ideas to build a better desktop, both of which are being raised by the open source GNOME Foundation. GNOME is one of the most popular Linux desktop GUIs and is included in nearly every Linux distribution.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

  • CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes
    Harry (Lei) Zhang, together with the CTO of HyperHQ, Xu Wang, will present “CRI: The Second Boom of Container Runtimes” at KubeCon + CloudNativeCon EU 2018, May 2-4 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The presentation will clarify about more about CRI, container runtimes, KataContainers and where they are going. Please join them if you are interested in learning more.
  • Meet Gloo, the ‘Function Gateway’ That Unifies Legacy APIs, Microservices, and Serverless
    Gloo, a single binary file written in Go, can be deployed as a Kubernetes pod, in a Docker container, and now also on Cloud Foundry. The setup also requires a copy of Envoy, though the installation process can be greatly simplified through additional software developed by the company, TheTool. The user then writes configuration objects to capture the workflow logic.
  • Why is the kernel community replacing iptables with BPF?

    The Linux kernel community recently announced bpfilter, which will replace the long-standing in-kernel implementation of iptables with high-performance network filtering powered by Linux BPF, all while guaranteeing a non-disruptive transition for Linux users.

  • The developer of Helium Rain gave an update on their sales, low overall sales but a high Linux percentage
    Helium Rain [Steam, Official Site], the gorgeous space sim from Deimos Games is really quite good so it's a shame they've seen such low overall sales. In total, they've had around 14,000€ (~$17,000) in sales which is not a lot for a game at all. The good news, is that out of the two thousand copies they say they've sold, a huge 14% of them have come from Linux. It's worth noting, that number has actually gone up since we last spoke to them, where they gave us a figure of 11% sales on Linux.
  • Want to try Wild Terra Online? We have another load of keys to give away (update: all gone)
    Wild Terra Online [Steam], the MMO from Juvty Worlds has a small but dedicated following, now is your chance to see if it's for you.
  • Arch Linux Finally Rolling Out Glibc 2.27
    Arch Linux is finally transitioning to glibc 2.27, which may make for a faster system. Glibc 2.27 was released at the start of February. This updated GNU C Library shipped with many performance optimizations particularly for Intel/x86_64 but also some ARM tuning and more. Glibc 2.27 also has memory protection keys support and other feature additions, but the performance potential has been most interesting to us.
  • Installed nvidia driver
  • Stephen Smoogen: Fedora Infrastructure Hackathon (day 1-5)
  • Design and Web team summary – 20 April 2018
    The team manages all web projects across Canonical. From www.ubuntu.com to the Juju GUI we help to bring beauty and consistency to all the web projects.
  • Costales: UbuCon Europe 2018 | 1 Week to go!!
    We'll have an awesome weekend of conferences (with 4 parallel talks), podcasts, stands, social events... Most of them are in English, but there will be in Spanish & Asturian too.
  • Tough, modular embedded PCs start at $875
    Advantech has launched two rugged, Linux-ready embedded DIN-rail computers with Intel Bay Trail SoCs and iDoor expansion: an “UNO-1372G-E” with 3x GbE ports and a smaller UNO-1372G-J with only 2x GbE, but with more serial and USB ports.

OSS Leftovers

  • IRS Website Crash Reminder of HealthCare.gov Debacle as OMB Pushes Open Source
    OMB is increasingly pushing agencies to adopt open source solutions, and in 2016 launched a pilot project requiring at least 20 percent of custom developed code to be released as open source – partly to strengthen and help maintain it by tapping a community of developers. OMB memo M-16-21 further asks agencies to make any code they develop available throughout the federal government in order to encourage its reuse. “Open source solutions give agencies access to a broad community of developers and the latest advancements in technology, which can help alleviate the issues of stagnated or out-dated systems while increasing flexibility as agency missions evolve over time,” says Henry Sowell, chief information security officer at Hortonworks Federal. “Enterprise open source also allows government agencies to reduce the risk of vendor lock-in and the vulnerabilities of un-supported software,” he adds.
  • Migrations: the sole scalable fix to tech debt.

    Migrations are both essential and frustratingly frequent as your codebase ages and your business grows: most tools and processes only support about one order of magnitude of growth before becoming ineffective, so rapid growth makes them a way of life. This isn't because they're bad processes or poor tools, quite the opposite: the fact that something stops working at significantly increased scale is a sign that it was designed appropriately to the previous constraints rather than being over designed.

  • Gui development is broken

    Why is this so hard? I just want low-level access to write a simple graphical interface in a somewhat obscure language.

OpenBSD and NetBSD

Security: Twitter and Facebook

  • Twitter banned Kaspersky Lab from advertising in Jan
     

    Twitter has banned advertising from Russian security vendor Kaspersky Lab since January, the head of the firm, Eugene Kaspersky, has disclosed.  

  • When you go to a security conference, and its mobile app leaks your data
     

    A mobile application built by a third party for the RSA security conference in San Francisco this week was found to have a few security issues of its own—including hard-coded security keys and passwords that allowed a researcher to extract the conference's attendee list. The conference organizers acknowledged the vulnerability on Twitter, but they say that only the first and last names of 114 attendees were exposed.

  • The Security Risks of Logging in With Facebook
     

    In a yet-to-be peer-reviewed study published on Freedom To Tinker, a site hosted by Princeton's Center for Information Technology Policy, three researchers document how third-party tracking scripts have the capability to scoop up information from Facebook's login API without users knowing. The tracking scripts documented by Steven Englehardt, Gunes Acar, and Arvind Narayanan represent a small slice of the invisible tracking ecosystem that follows users around the web largely without their knowledge.

  • Facebook Login data hijacked by hidden JavaScript trackers
     

    If you login to websites through Facebook, we've got some bad news: hidden trackers can suck up more of your data than you'd intended to give away, potentially opening it up to abuse.