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Saturday, 30 Jul 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story No Ubuntu Default Extras Install srlinuxx 19/04/2011 - 4:40pm
Story Beta version of Fedora 15 includes GNOME 3 and systemd srlinuxx 19/04/2011 - 4:38pm
Story What Does Google Owe FOSS? srlinuxx 19/04/2011 - 4:37pm
Story Installing Cherokee With PHP5 And MySQL Support On Debian Squeeze falko 19/04/2011 - 11:13am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 19/04/2011 - 6:24am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 19/04/2011 - 5:59am
Story How Vidalia and GIMP found new contributors, just by asking srlinuxx 19/04/2011 - 2:39am
Story FOSS Trademarks are Probably OK srlinuxx 19/04/2011 - 2:38am
Story Kubuntu, for better or worse srlinuxx 19/04/2011 - 2:35am
Story Storage Highlights in 2.6.38 srlinuxx 18/04/2011 - 11:26pm

Fund Established for Children of Nina Reiser

Filed under
Reiser

A friend of Nina Reiser, an Oakland woman police believe was murdered, has helped set up an education fund for her two young children. Rory and Nio are living with Nina's mother, Irina Sharanova.

For love or money?

Filed under
OSS

There are really two bazaars that fire the boilers for free software: one dominated by talented amateurs who create for love; the other, by professionals who create for money. This creates a curious bi-modal nature to the free software/open source community.

Sony PlayStation 3: the Ars Technica review

Filed under
Gaming

There it is, sitting in my entertainment center: the PlayStation 3. Getting my PS3 was surprisingly easy—no long preorder line—and when the system was released I arrived at 8:00am and picked it up. Simple. I wasn't shot at and there wasn't a lot of fuss. It sounds like I was one of the lucky ones.

SCALE Readies 'Non-Commercial' Open Source Conference

Filed under
OSS

Despite the proliferation of LinuxWorld and other commercial open source shows, several regional Linux organizations continue to hold their own conferences and expos. Right now, for example, a group of open sourcers in California is readying SCALE (Southern California Linux Expo) 5x, an event slated to take place in Los Angeles on February 9 to 11 of next year.

Red Hat Doesn't Want Mono

Filed under
Linux

There are a lot of great new programs and innovations expected in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5. The Novell-led Mono project isn't one of them.

Novell Speaks Updated - Microsoft has now responded

Filed under
SUSE

Microsoft and Novell have agreed to disagree on whether certain open source offerings infringe Microsoft patents and whether certain Microsoft offerings infringe Novell patents.... We at Microsoft respect Novell's point of view on the patent issue, even while we respectfully take a different view.

Switching Jobs with a Terminal

Filed under
HowTos

While writing a script in a text editor, suddenly, I sense a strong desire to refer the bash manual. To stop the current job and return to shell prompt, press Ctrl+z, and here’s what I see:

Novell and the Brave New Open Source World

Filed under
SUSE

For some people, when Novell recently made a deal with Microsoft, they might as well have sold their soul to the devil. I'm fed up with people acting like Novell has become a heretic in the Church of Open Source.

Novell CEO addresses patent concerns

Filed under
SUSE

Novell CEO Ron Hovsepian has issued a public letter addressing concerns about the recent agreement between Novell and Microsoft and how it might impact Linux customers. The letter does not appear to be available on Novell's homepage so far, so I will reprint the full text here:

IP company sues AMD over patents

Filed under
Legal

Opti, a chip-oriented intellectual property company, said it has filed a lawsuit alleging that Advanced Micro Devices violated three patents with its Opteron processors and other products.

Consolehelper Quick HowTo

Filed under
HowTos

After a quick look at: man 8 consolehelper, man 8 userhelper, man 8 pam, and man 8 pam_console, and at the way other applications use PAM, I made my own way to add a "Root File Manager" icon in a distro that only has kdesu (which I will not use).

Del.icio.us bookmarks extension for Firefox

Filed under
Moz/FF

Organizing your favorite Web sites with bookmarks on Firefox can be tedious, especially when you want to keep your bookmarks synchronized across several computers at the same time. That's why I started using del.icio.us, the social bookmarking service now owned by Yahoo! Yahoo! recently released a del.icio.us bookmarks extension for Firefox that fully integrates del.icio.us with Firefox bookmarks.

Postfix and Spamassassin: How to filter spam

Filed under
HowTos

Postfix is a widely used mail transport agent (MTA) used on many popular Unix/Linux systems. Nowadays, networks are overwhelmed by SPAM mail, fortunately, there is a way to filter them with software such as spamassassin.

Easy video creation using only FOSS software

Filed under
Software

While digital video editing today is an affordable, popular activity for both the computer hobbyist and amateur cinematographer, many people seem to think that video creation under Linux is either impossible or too difficult for the average computer user. Not so! From video capture to editing to DVD authoring and encoding, you can create high-quality videos easily with free, open source software.

Season of Usability 2006/2007 Open

Filed under
OSS

Season of Usability 2006/2007 is a series of sponsored student projects to encourage students of usability, user-interface design, and interaction design to get involved with Freee/Libre/Open-Source Software (FLOSS) projects. If you are a student of usability, user-interface design, interaction design or related subjects send us your application.

The Happy State of ODF implementation in Massachusetts

Filed under
OSS

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia and Boston, Massachusetts are half a world apart in distance, but side by side in their commitment to adopt ODF. Sad to say, however, I am hearing from Malaysia that those who are working to see ODF adopted as a Malaysian National Standard are being confronted with the same tactics there that were so pervasive here a year ago, including the dissemination of a great deal of misinformation. I will write today on the happy state of ODF adoption in the Commonwealth.

GP2X handheld lets penguins run amok

Filed under
Gaming

ENTHUSIASTS REJOICE. The world's best underdog handheld is back is and it's better than ever. The people who brought us the GP32 handheld have recently released its successor, the GP2X and while it's certainly not everyone's cup of tea it does appear to have strong geek appeal.

Ubuntu Multimedia Center - Installation howto & Screenshots

Filed under
Ubuntu

Ubuntu Multimedia Center is a complete Linux-based operating system, freely available with community and professional support.It is also a live cd that is ubuntu derived and also free. This system was inspired by the fact that ubuntu didn’t have much of a multimedia center.Because users would have to manually download the codecs for playing mp3’s and what not.The main objective of this project is multimedia related programs available to users as easy as possible.

Aaron J. Seigo: thoughts on framing "kde"

Filed under
KDE

for the last year or so there have been two sets of thoughts squirming in the back of my mind with regards to the name "kde" and how we're going to communicate what that means in a post-4.0 world.

Ubuntu-Server 6.10 As A Firewall/Gateway For Your Small Business

Filed under
HowTos

This is a COPY&PASTE howto creating a firewall/(mail)gateway for a small network (say 10 to 15 users or so on a PIII 450MHz, 512 MB ram and two identical network interface cards, broadband connection, fully featured, for a bussines environment.

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More in Tux Machines

Parabola GNU/Linux-libre 2016.07.27 Adds LightDM as Default Display Manager

André Fabian Silva Delgado proudly announced the availability for download of the live ISO images of the Parabola GNU/Linux-libre 2016.07.27 operating system based on Arch Linux. Read more

Modular Moto Z Android phone supports DIY and RPi HAT add-ons

Motorola and Element14 have launched a development kit for creating add-on modules for the new modular Moto Z smartphone, including an adapter for RPi HATs. We don’t usually cover smartphones here at HackerBoards because most don’t offer much opportunity for hardware hacking. Yet, Lenovo’s Motorola Mobility subsidiary has spiced up the smartphone space this week by announcing a modular, hackable “Moto Mods” backplate expansion system for its new Android-based Moto Z smartphones. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Windows 10 pain: Reg man has 75 per cent upgrade failure rate
    As your humble HPC correspondent for The Register, I should probably be running Linux on the array of systems here at the home office suite. But I don't. I've been a Microsoft guy since I bought my first computer way back in 1984. You, dear readers, can rip me for being a MStard, but it works worked well for my business and personal needs. I've had my ups and downs with the company, but I think I've received good value for my money and I've managed to solve every problem I've had over the years. Until yesterday, that is. Yesterday was the day that I marked on my calendar as "Upgrade to Windows 10 Day." We currently have four systems in our arsenal here, two laptops and two desktops. The laptops are Lenovo R61 and W510 systems, and the desktops are a garden variety box based on an Asus P7P55D Pro motherboard. The other desktop is my beloved Hydra 2.0 liquid cooled, dual-processor, monster system based on the EVGA Classified SR-2 motherboard. These details turn out to be important in our story.
  • Rygel/Shotwell/GUADEC
  • How to setup HTTP2 in cPanel/WHM Linux VPS using EasyApache3
  • Pushed Fedora Graphical upgrade via Gnome software utility
  • openSUSE Tumbleweed – Review of the Week 2016/30
  • Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS Available for System76 PCs, Ubuntu 15.10 Users Must Upgrade
    As reported by us last week, Canonical announced the first point release of the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus), and it looks like the guys over System76 were pretty quick to push the update to users' computers. Ubuntu 16.04.1 LTS is the latest, most advanced version of the Xenial Xerus operating system, and we recommend that you upgrade to it as soon as possible if you didn't do it already. This is an important point release because it also opens up the upgrade path for users of the Ubuntu 14.04.4 LTS (Trusty Tahr) distribution.
  • A Reminder Of Why I Hate Ubuntu
    Yesterday I was reminded why I hate Ubuntu. I suddenly was unable to SSH into Odroid-C2. From Odroid-C2 I could do everything as normal. It turned out the IP address had changed despite my HOST declaration in Beast’s DHCP server and Odroid-C2 being set to use DHCP, or so I thought. Nope. There was a dhclient.conf file in Odroid-C2 which requested everything and the kitchen sink from DHCP, stuff I had no use of like netbios… The man page for the dhclient.conf file says it all: “The require statement lists options that must be sent in order for an offer to be accepted. Offers that do not contain all the listed options will be ignored. There is no default require list.”
  • Thin Mini-ITX board taps Braswell SoCs, offers 4K video
    IEI’s “tKINO-BW” Mini-ITX board features Intel Pentium and Celeron “Braswell” SoCs, 4K video, triple display support, and optional remote management. Over the last year, numerous Mini-ITX boards based on Intel’s “Braswell” family of 14nm SoCs have reached market, but there have been far fewer models billed as being “thin.” This somewhat arbitrary term refers to boards with low-profile coastline port layouts, generally for space-constrained embedded applications rather than big gaming boxes.

Server Administration

  • MicroBadger and the Awesome Power of Container Labels
    Containers have the power to change infrastructure architecture, making it more secure and more energy efficient. This is because containerized applications can be started, stopped or juggled from machine to machine in seconds — far faster than applications can be moved on VMs or bare metal. That speed opens up the world to intelligent container-aware tools that can control what’s running in a data center in near real time. Combined with clever tooling, containers could help make data centers less static and more like an organic body: re-assigning resources or repelling threats as and when required. But for this vision to come about, those clever tools of the future need information. They need to know things like: is a particular containerized image mission critical? Does it contain a security flaw? Can it be safely stopped? Who should be paged if it crashes?
  • 7 Tips for SysAdmins Considering a Linux Foundation Training Certification
    Open source is the new normal for startups and large enterprises looking to stay competitive in the digital economy. That means that open source is now also a viable long-term career path. “It is important to start thinking about the career road map, and the pathway that you can take and how Linux and open source in general can help you meet your career goals,” said Clyde Seepersad, general manager of training at The Linux Foundation, in a recent webinar.
  • 3 Unique Takes on the Linux Terminal at Your Command
    When I first started on my journey with Linux, back in the late 1990s, there was one inevitability: the terminal. You couldn’t escape it. The command line was a part of your daily interaction with the open source platform and that was that. Today’s Linux is a much different beast. New and seasoned users alike can work with the platform and never touch the command line or terminal. But, on the off-chance you do want to take advantage of the power that is the command line, it’s good to know there are numerous options available, some of which offer unique takes on the task. Those are the terminals I want to highlight today—the ones that offer more than just the ability to enter a command. If you’re looking for a far more efficient interaction with your terminal and OS, or you’re looking for more flexibility with your terminal, one of these will certainly fit your needs.
  • OpsDev Is Coming
    OpsDev means that the dependencies of the various application components must be understood and modeled first before the development process begins.
  • One DevOps tool for all clouds: Cloudify
    Who doesn't want one program to run multiple clouds? I know I do. Cloudify, an open-source orchestration software company, now claims it can support all the top five public clouds and Azure, OpenStack, and VMware, with its latest release, Cloudify 3.4.
  • 5 sysadmin horror stories
    The job ain't easy. There are constantly systems to update, bugs to fix, users to please, and on and on. A sysadmin's job might even entail fixing the printer (sorry). To celebrate the hard work our sysadmins do for us, keeping our machines up and running, we've collected five horror stories that prove just how scary / difficult it can be.
  • A guide to scientific computing system administration
    When developing applications for science there are times when you need to move beyond the desktop, but a fast, single node system may also suffice. In my time as a researcher and scientific software developer I have had the opportunity to work on a vast array of different systems, from old systems churning through data to some of the largest supercomputers on the planet.