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Monday, 19 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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OpenSUSE 11.0: A Solid, Up-to-Date Linux Desktop

Filed under
SUSE

linuxplanet.com: openSUSE 11.0 is based on the Linux kernel version 2.6.25 and provides a cornucopia of features. If you choose to download the full DVD, you can expect a whopping 4.5 GBs for the iso-format file. Other options include a Live CD and over the network.

Jim Zemlin: The New Center of Linux Gravity

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Standing at the headwaters of the ecosystem that is Linux is the Linux Foundation and its executive director Jim Zemlin. The Linux Foundation was forged out of the merger of the Open Source Development Labs (OSDL) and the Free Standards Group in 2007 as a new group with a new mandate for Linux.

Why use Shell in Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

computingtech.blogspot: The real measure of a Linux user expertise comes from your abilities at the shell. In our modern age, the GUI is mistakenly considered “progress.” Most modern Linux distributions prefer you to use the GUI to do nearly everything. However, it’s well worth developing at least some command-line shell skills, for a number of reasons:

Ubuntu 8.10 To Use Linux 2.6.27 Kernel?

Filed under
Ubuntu

phoronix.com: Generating buzz this morning with the release of the Linux 2.6.27-rc4 kernel is word that Ubuntu may switch to the Linux 2.6.27 kernel for their forthcoming 8.10 "Intrepid Ibex" release.

Microsoft + Novell = Monopoly 2.0?

Filed under
Microsoft
SUSE

opensource.org: Microsoft's silence on the topic of what they can do for Open Source has now been shattered by the news that they will follow none of the suggestions by any of the leaders in the open source community. Rather, they will spend another $100M on software they have no intention of ever actually using.

Blatantly Supporting Linux. Sort of.

Filed under
Hardware

blog.linuxtoday: More hardware manufacturers than ever support Linux in some way- they supply binary drivers, or support and sponsor FOSS drivers. Even better, some actually admit it publicly. Though some still act like you want to peek up their skirts when you ask about Linux.

Displaying System Information On Linux Or Unix With Cfg2html

Filed under
Software

linuxshellaccount.blogspot: The script (which is available for free) is called cfg2html and, from my experience so far, I must say it does a fantastic job of reporting what's reportable and making for a very easy-to-read html server analysis (even if I do have to page-down 50 times to look at absolutely everything it reports on).

phpMinAdmin is a powerful minimalist MySQL editor

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you've ever worked with and manipulated MySQL databases, chances are you've used phpMyAdmin to manage your databases from a Web interface. But phpMyAdmin can be a little complex; if you want a lightweight alternative, try phpMinAdmin.

Taking it further: XEN and OpenVZ

Filed under
HowTos

In a prior tutorial I showed you how to install XEN on CentOS 5.2 to isolate services. This is a good aproach when you have a dedicated server and you want to isolate your services. However, what will you do if you have a dedicated server and you rent Virtual Machines (VMs)?

Travelocity's parent company hails Red Hat Enterprise Linux 5

Filed under
Linux

techtarget.com: Sabre Holdings Corp., the $3 billion online network best known for Travelocity, has adopted Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) as the corporate standard for its global ticketing and airline services businesses and will implement RHEL 5 in all future acquisitions.

AMD Catalyst 8.8 Linux Driver, Exciting New Features

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Today AMD has announced another Catalyst driver release for Linux and this is arguably the most significant driver update since last October's release when AIGLX support was added. Catalyst 8.8 delivers CrossFire support on Linux, OverDrive overclocking support, adaptive anti-aliasing support, and other improvements.

Novell might infringe the GPL

Filed under
SUSE

beranger.org: Red Hat makes publicly available to anyone, in free access (here), the complete source code for all the packages included in RHEL, including the sources for the commercially-available updates. Novell only makes publicly available to anyone, in free access (here and here), only the source code for the packages "as of release."

Twitter Clients For Ubuntu 8.04 Desktop

Filed under
Ubuntu
HowTos

In this article I will show how to install and use two clients for the popular microblogging platform Twitter on an Ubuntu 8.04 desktop. The first one is Twitux, the second Twitter client is gtwitter. Both clients have similar features, so it is up to you which one you want to install.

Ultraportable laptops: Their rise and possible fall

Filed under
Hardware

computerworld.com: For some users, the new generation of ultraportable notebooks comes close to embodying the Holy Grail for road warriors. Their laptop-like keyboards make them more usable for typing tasks than smart phones, but they are lighter and cheaper than traditional laptops. However, while pundits and technology journalists have lavished attention on these products, skeptics have raised questions.

28 Coolest Firefox About:Config Tricks

Filed under
Moz/FF

maketecheasier.com: You may have installed countless add-on in Firefox to enhance your using experience, but if you want to get the most out of Firefox, you really have to hack your way into the about:config.

Using Linux for Photography, where we stand

Filed under
Software

jcornuz.wordpress: I feel like it is time for a little rant indepth analysis summary of where we stand. I mean of where Linux stands as far as photography is concerned.

Isn't Linux just UNIX under a different name?

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: What's the big deal about Linux? Isn't it at heart just a PC-based version of UNIX – the ‘70’s hit operating system which has outlived the predictions of its demise throughout the ‘90’s? If you’ve come from a Solaris or HP/UX or AIX background isn’t a PC-based UNIX a bit, well, passé?

5 Great Alternative Linux Music Players

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: Amarok, Rhythmbox and Banshee are a few of the popular music players in Linux. They are great in features and have received plenty of good reviews. But what is unknown to many is that there are a lot of other music players for Linux which are also great in features, but are hidden in some corners of the world.

Also: 8 Free, Open Source Tools for Video Playback and Encoding

Linux popularity across the globe

Filed under
Linux

pingdom.com: The Linux landscape is constantly changing and has a strong community of both developers and users. But where is Linux the most popular, and where are the different Linux distributions the most popular?

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • MySQL Drizzle Project

  • Red Hat: The money's in JBoss, not the desktop
  • How the Internet All Began…
  • Open source and the ‘fear factor’ mentality
  • Opera patches 7 bugs but keeps one secret
  • openSUSE to add SELinux Basic Enablement in 11.1
  • A starring role for open source in Government
  • SLE 11 Beta Testing - Apply If Interested…
  • Help your favorite "public interest" free software project win $10,000
  • Atlanta Linux Fest 2008
  • Pidgin IM Client 2.5.0 Released
  • Shadowgrounds Linux Game Update
  • Linux gains backup utility
  • Dragon Multimedia Player For Linux
  • Open Source: Why BusinessWeek is Wrong And Compiere Is Right
  • Ubuntu: Old Hat?
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More in Tux Machines

How Linux became my job

I've been using open source since what seems like prehistoric times. Back then, there was nothing called social media. There was no Firefox, no Google Chrome (not even a Google), no Amazon, barely an internet. In fact, the hot topic of the day was the new Linux 2.0 kernel. The big technical challenges in those days? Well, the ELF format was replacing the old a.out format in binary Linux distributions, and the upgrade could be tricky on some installs of Linux. Read more

Linux 4.16-rc2

It's been a quiet week, and rc2 is out. I take the fairly quiet rc be a good sign for 4.16, but honestly, rc2 is often fairly calm. That's probably because people are taking a breather after the merge window, but also simply because it might take a while to find any issues. But let's be optimistic, and just assume - at least for now - that it's because all is well. The diffstat is fairly odd, but that often happens with small rc's just because then just a couple of pulls will skew things easily in one or two directions. This time the patch is about one third architecture updates (arm64, x86, powerpc), one third tooling (mostly 'perf') and one third "rest". And yes, the bulk of that rest is drivers (gpu, nvme, sound, misc), but those drivers are still distinctly *not* the bulk of the whole patch. Go out and test, it all looks fine. Read more Also: Linux 4.16-rc2 Kernel Released

OpenStreetMap in IkiWiki and Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble

  • OSM in IkiWiki
    Since about 15 years ago, I have been thinking of creating a geo-referenced wiki of pubs, with loads of structured data to help searching. I don't know if that would be useful for anybody else, but I know I would use it! Sadly, the many times I started coding something towards that goal, I ended blocked by something, and I keep postponing my dream project.
  • Why OpenStreetMap is in Serious Trouble
    That said, while I still believe in the goals of OpenStreetMap, I feel the OpenStreetMap project is currently unable to fulfill that mission due to poor technical decisions, poor political decisions, and a general malaise in the project. I'm going to outline in this article what I think OpenStreetMap has gotten wrong. It's entirely possible that OSM will reform and address the impediments to its success- and I hope it does. We need a Free as in Freedom geographic dataset.

Linux KPI-Based DRM Modules Now Working On FreeBSD 11

Thanks to work done by Hans Petter Selasky and others, this drm-next-kmod port is working on FreeBSD 11 stable. What's different with this package from the ports collection versus the ported-from-Linux Direct Rendering Modules found within the FreeBSD 11 kernel is that these DRM modules are using the linuxkpi interface. Read more