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Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

What Does MS Want? -- Brains for Sale?

Filed under
OSS

groklaw: I found a video on the Novell-Microsoft Interop Ability page that clears up for me at least part of what Microsoft wants from deals like the deal with Novell. Just what is that bridge Microsoft has had with academia, I wondered? What does Microsoft have in mind for Open Source businesses that sign up for that bridge?

Also: Novell reveals Microsoft’s open source strategy
And: What's behind Microsoft's open-source deals?

Should We Fight for Ogg Vorbis?

LinuxJournal: I'm a big fan of Richard Stallman and his work – even though, the first time I interviewed him, he proceeded to criticise my questions before answering them, not a journalistic experience I'd had before. Without his vision and sheer bloody-mindedness in the face of indifference and outright hostility, we would not have the vast array of free software we enjoy today.

KDE/Linux everywhere?

Filed under
KDE

/home/liquidat: Today I saw that a drugstore where I bought a CD was using a KDE based system for managing there CDs and DVDs. This lead to the question how many hidden KDE installations - and Linux installations in general - are out there.

Ubuntu 7.10 to make Multi-Monitor Setup Easier

Filed under
Ubuntu

CyberNetNews: Besides for those features there is one thing that I am super excited to see implemented, and that’s a user interface (UI) for managing dual monitors. Everyday I hook my laptop up to a 24" external monitor so that I can get a dual-screen setup.

Vista Effects On Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

Raiden's Realm: The great new operating system promised by Microsoft turns out to be a disaster. I've been going against the multi-billion dollar standard by pressing businesses to take a serious look at open source software. I use Linux almost exclusively for my own business operations.

Linux: Linus on the GPL, BSD, Tivo and the FSF

Filed under
OSS

kernelTRAP: A lengthy debate that began with a suggestion to dual license the Linux kernel under the GPLv2 and the GPLv3 [story] continues on the Linux Kernel Mailing List. Throughout the ongoing thread Linux creator Linus Torvalds has spoken out on the GPLv2, the upcoming GPLv3, the BSD license, Tivo, the Free Software Foundation, and much more.

Welcome to the world of Online Desktop

Filed under
OS

tech trouble?: There were some online services available now that can provide you Desktop like environment (some call it WebOS) through a web browser - with applications and storage spaces - that you can customize and access anytime from any computer and from any where in the world!

The worst open source project names

Filed under
Humor

tipotheday.com: The GIMP. It sounds more like something you'd drag out of a dark box in your hidden underground lair than an image manipulation program -- and yet, someone, somewhere, thought it was a great name. It still secures first place on my list, but we'll move on to the more interesting ones now.

Novell opens office for SMBs

Filed under
SUSE

Register: Novell is gunning for a chunk of the office market share from Microsoft with the release of its open workgroup suite for small businesses.

What's stopping ThinkFree from liberating businesses from Microsoft Office?

Filed under
Software

computerworld: Trucking firm Ryder System Inc. is one of ThinkFree Inc.'s best customers. It is also a maddening example of the obstacles that ThinkFree and its pioneering founder and CEO, T.J. Kang, face trying to convince CIOs that its online office software is ready for big business.

What the world needs now is Google Linux

Filed under
Linux

the Inquirer: IF ANYONE CAN TAKE ON MICROSOFT it's Google. Both companies make squillions out of doing not much at all, which is the key to having your share price sit on top of the roof.

Microsofts next partners: Mandriva and TurboLinux

Filed under
Linux

opensourcelearning: Microsoft is on the march. Novell, Xandros, Linspire, hiring Tom Hanrahan straight from the Open Source Development Labs. There should be no doubt that Microsoft has a strategy to….. Yes, to do what to Linux?

Converting All Your MS Outlook PST Files To Maildir Format

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft
HowTos

There are several non-commercial methods to achieve roughly the same goal, and in this tutorial we use IMAP (more specifically, courier-imap) to convert all our emails from PST to the Maildir format.

Controlling your Linux system processes

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: All modern operating systems are able to run many programs at the same time. For example, a typical Linux server might include a Web server, an email server, and probably a database service. Each of these programs runs as a separate process. What do you do if one of your services stops working? Here are some handy command-line tools for managing processes.

Linux community getting its second wind

Filed under
Linux

networkworld: Linux is entering its second phase of growth, which will be defined by better cooperation among developers, new licensing options, and a stronger operating system, according the leaders of the nonprofit Linux Foundation.

Microsoft's next Linux partner is...?

Filed under
Linux

linux-watch: Believe it or not, on my way to the Linux Foundation Collaboration Summit at the Googolplex this week, I realized that I knew at least one more Linux distributor would form a partnership with Microsoft, and that the most likely one was Linspire. So, who's next?

FSM Crossword 1

Filed under
OSS

FreeSoftware Mag: Here's the first cryptic crossword from Free Software Magazine. Most clues should lead you to words somehow associated with free software, but one or two "everyday" words have been slipped in to act as decoys. Smile

The Manager’s View of GPL Version 3: Two (and a Half) Things to Like and Two More to Look Out For

Filed under
OSS

CIO: The GNU Public License, one of the oldest and most widely selected open-source licenses, is about to get its second makeover. There’s been a lot of uncertainty about the GPL’s differences in version 3, and exactly what they mean for end users, developers and corporations.

Linspire deal: What will ESR and Shuttleworth do now?

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: A few months back, the self-styled open source advocate Eric S. Raymond made a grand announcement about switching Linux distributions and moving from Fedora to Ubuntu. What Raymond did not let on at that time - February 2007 - was that he had joined the board of Freespire.

Linux leaders plot counterattack on Microsoft

Filed under
Linux

Reuters: The high priests of free software have congregated at Google Inc. headquarters this week to debate the future of the movement and face down recent patent threats by Microsoft Corp.

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More in Tux Machines

CentOS vs Ubuntu: Which one is better for a server

Finally decided to get a VPS but can’t decide which Linux distro to use? We’ve all been there. The choice may even be overwhelming, even for Linux distros, considering all the different flavors and distros that are out there. Though, the two most widely used and most popular server distros are CentOS and Ubuntu. This is the main dilemma among admins, both beginners and professionals. Having experience with both (and more) distros, we decided to do a comparison of CentOS and Ubuntu when used for a server. Read more

This Script Updates Hosts Files Using a Multi-Source Unified Block List With Whitelisting

If you ever tinker with your hosts file, you should try running this script to automatically keep the file updated with the latest known ad servers, phishing sites and other web scum.

Read more

via DMT/Linux Blog

today's leftovers

  • FLOSS Weekly 417: OpenHMD
    Fredrik Hultin is the Co-founder of the OpenHMD project (together with Jakob Bornecrantz). OpenHMD aims to provide a Free and Open Source API and drivers for immersive technology, such as head-mounted displays with built-in head tracking. The project's aim is to implement support for as many devices as possible in a portable, cross-platform package.
  • My next EP will be released as a corrupted GPT image
    Endless OS is distributed as a compressed disk image, so you just write it to disk to install it. On first boot, it resizes itself to fill the whole disk. So, to “install” it to a file we decompress the image file, then extend it to the desired length. When booting, in principle we want to loopback-mount the image file and treat that as the root device. But there’s a problem: NTFS-3G, the most mature NTFS implementation for Linux, runs in userspace using FUSE. There are some practical problems arranging for the userspace processes to survive the transition out of the initramfs, but the bigger problem is that accessing a loopback-mounted image on an NTFS partition is slow, presumably because every disk access has an extra round-trip to userspace and back. Is there some way we can avoid this performance penalty?
  • This week in GTK+ – 31
    In this last week, the master branch of GTK+ has seen 52 commits, with 10254 lines added and 9466 lines removed.
  • Digest of Fedora 25 Reviews
    Fedora 25 has been out for 2 months and it seems like a very solid release, maybe the best in the history of the distro. And feedback from the press and users has also been very positive.
  • Monday's security updates
  • What does security and USB-C have in common?
    I've decided to create yet another security analogy! You can’t tell, but I’m very excited to do this. One of my long standing complaints about security is there are basically no good analogies that make sense. We always try to talk about auto safety, or food safety, or maybe building security, how about pollution. There’s always some sort of existing real world scenario we try warp and twist in a way so we can tell a security story that makes sense. So far they’ve all failed. The analogy always starts out strong, then something happens that makes everything fall apart. I imagine a big part of this is because security is really new, but it’s also really hard to understand. It’s just not something humans are good at understanding. [...] The TL;DR is essentially the world of USB-C cables is sort of a modern day wild west. There’s no way to really tell which ones are good and which ones are bad, so there are some people who test the cables. It’s nothing official, they’re basically volunteers doing this in their free time. Their feedback is literally the only real way to decide which cables are good and which are bad. That’s sort of crazy if you think about it.
  • NuTyX 8.2.93 released
  • Linux Top 3: Parted Magic, Quirky and Ultimate Edition
    Parted Magic is a very niche Linux distribution that many users first discover when they're trying to either re-partition a drive or recover data from an older system. The new Parted Magic 2017_01_08 release is an incremental update that follows the very large 2016_10_18 update that provided 800 updates.
  • How To Use Google Translate From Commandline In Linux
  • How to debug C programs in Linux using gdb
  • Use Docker remotely on Atomic Host
  • Ubuntu isn’t the only version of Linux that can run on Windows 10
  • OpenSUSE Linux lands on Windows 10
  • How to run openSUSE Leap 42.2 or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server 12 on Windows 10

Leftovers: Software and Games