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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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openSUSE 10.3 and KDE 4.0

Filed under
KDE
SUSE

kdedevelopers: Did anyone miss a news splash these days about openSUSE 10.3 not shipping KDE 4.0 as default KDE desktop like some other distro? Or maybe not as we have not been telling everyone the last half year that we would.

Linux: Discussing the Really Fair Scheduler

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Ingo Molnar reviewed Roman Zippel's Really Fair Scheduler code, suggesting that much of the work was similar to that which was being done by Peter Zijlstra, "all in one, we don't disagree, this is an incremental improvement we are thinking about for 2.6.24. We do disagree with this being positioned as something fundamentally different though.

Too many Linux distros?

Filed under
Linux

raiden's blogs: One of the things that's been repeated over and over and over again, and mostly by critics of Linux, is that Linux has too many distributions. Honestly, that's not really true.

VirtualBox 1.5 released with seamless Windows integration

Filed under
Software

liquidat: The newest version now features seamless integration of Microsoft Windows guests. That means that you can use MS Windows programs outside of the virtual machine window. They appear just as any other window at the screen.

Once again, reality trumps idealism

Filed under
OS

jem report: Recently a Linux kernel developer tried to relicense an OpenBSD network driver under the GPL, but was caught early in the process and the error was properly addressed with public rebuke. In an unrelated incident, the vice president of the FreeBSD Foundation reiterated that open source software as originally and traditionally exemplified through BSD operating systems, and free software as presented by the Free Software Foundation, are not the same thing.

Running Linux Applications In An Embedded, Real-Time Environment

Filed under
Software

webdotdev.com: This paper starts with a discussion of the architectural features of the Linux kernel, with particular emphasis on showing where there is a good match with the requirements of the embedded market and where problems exist. The paper then goes on the present a comparison of the different approaches that have been used to adapt Linux for real time and embedded systems.

Portable Security for the Practical Paranoid

Filed under
Software
Security

opensourcelearning.info: Recently I have been thinking about my online security. It lead me on a brief search for portable applications which at least give me the feeling that I am more secure that I am now.

Open Source Evolutionary

Filed under
OSS

redmond developer: Miguel de Icaza's path from programmer to free software evangelist to Novell Inc. vice president has unfolded like the lives of many luminaries -- he fell into it by chance and seized the opportunities.

Productivity enhancers for Thunderbird

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: As with Firefox, you can extend Thunderbird's functionality by installing extensions. Mozilla's official extension repository has quite a few nifty tools on offer, and which ones you choose to install depends entirely on your needs. There are, however, a few extensions that you might find indispensable no matter how you use Thunderbird.

BBC confirms Doctor Who series five

Filed under
SciFi

the register: The BBC has announced there will be a fifth series of Doctor Who, although it won't be until 2010 and David Tennant is doubtful to reprise his role as the Time Lord.

Open Source Gaming Review: Battle Tanks

Filed under
Gaming

Raiden's Realm: Battle Tanks is a fun little arcade style combat game that takes an old cliched concept and makes it more fun than you can wrap your little fingers around.

Yearning for the days of rolling your own

Filed under
Linux

techrepublic blogs: It used to be, you know - back in the day, that you almost always had to roll your own Linux kernel. Inevitably there was a feature you needed or a bit of hardware unsupported in the standard kernel. Be it a specific networking card, sound card, wireless…you name it…we were all compiling kernels. In fact, it became a sort of right of passage in order to join the ranks of the Linux elite.

People of openSUSE: Benjamin Weber

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse news: Today you can read which answers to the ‘People of openSUSE’ questions Benji Weber provides. 21 years old, British, and a student studying Computer Science at the University of Warwick. Just completed a work placement year doing software development.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 218

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Tips and tricks: Correcting screen resolutions

  • News: Ubuntu's Hardy Heron, FreeBSD's graphical "finstall", Debian's new packages database, MagDriva
  • Released last week: Linux From Scratch 6.3, ALT Linux 4.0
  • Upcoming releases: Fedora 8 Test 2, openSUSE 10.3 Beta 3
  • Donations: lighttpd receives €290.00
  • New additions: Draco GNU/Linux
  • New distributions: Slackel Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Ubuntu and ThinkPad X60, an ideal match

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic: With my older IBM ThinkPad R50e starting to show its age, I recently decided to upgrade to a newer ThinkPad, this time under the Lenovo name. There was a time when installing Linux on a notebook computer was a plug-and-pray operation. Not so on the X60.

Introducing BlackRoute

Filed under
Linux

softpedia: BlackRoute is yet another Slackware-based Linux distribution for security and forensic analysis, created for x86 compatible architectures. What is so special about BlackRoute is the fact that it tries to create an Open Source Linux distribution for advanced users, security and network specialists and system administrators.

Linux Gazette September 2007 (#142) Issue Ready

Filed under
Linux

The 142nd issue of Linux Gazette is now online. Highlights include Preventing Domain Expiration, Writing PostgreSQL Functions in C, and SMTP Authentication with Postfix. Read Here.

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New Emojis Come, Celtx Goes Away

Development News

Security Leftovers

  • How To Improve The Linux System’s Security Using Firejail
    As you already know, Linux kernel is secure by default. But, it doesn’t mean that the softwares on the Linux system are completely secure. Say for example, there is a possibility that any add-ons on your web browser may cause some serious security issues. While doing financial transactions over internet, some key logger may be active in browser which you are not aware of. Even though, we can’t completely give the bullet-proof security to our Linux box, we still can add an extra pinch of security using an application called Firejail. It is a security utility which can sandbox any such application and let it to run in a controlled environment. To put this simply, Firejail is a SUID (Set owner User ID up on execution) program that reduces the risk of security breaches by restricting the running environment of untrusted applications.
  • “Httpd and Relayd Mastery” off to copyedit
  • Kalyna Block Cipher

Containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs

  • Setting the Record Straight: containers vs. Zones vs. Jails vs. VMs
    I’m tired of having the same conversation over and over again with people so I figured I would put it into a blog post. Many people ask me if I have tried or what I think of Solaris Zones / BSD Jails. The answer is simply: I have tried them and I definitely like them. The conversation then heads towards them telling me how Zones and Jails are far superior to containers and that I should basically just give up with Linux containers and use VMs. Which to be honest is a bit forward to someone who has spent a large portion of her career working with containers and trying to make containers more secure. Here is what I tell them:
  • [Old] Hadoop Has Failed Us, Tech Experts Say

    The Hadoop community has so far failed to account for the poor performance and high complexity of Hadoop, Johnson says. “The Hadoop ecosystem is still basically in the hands of a small number of experts,” he says. “If you have that power and you’ve learned know how to use these tools and you’re programmer, then this thing is super powerful. But there aren’t a lot of those people. I’ve read all these things how we need another million data scientists in the world, which I think means our tools aren’t very good.”