Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 29 May 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mozilla inadvertently publishes thousands of user IDs srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 6:04pm
Story 9 Free and Open Source Software Stories to Watch in 2011 srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 6:02pm
Story AriOS: Light Interface Lotsa Apps Ubuntu Remaster srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 6:01pm
Story 7 Predictions For Open Source in 2011 srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 4:21pm
Story LinuxUser's kernel column #95 by Jon Masters srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 4:20pm
Story Year in Review: Open source srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 4:16pm
Story The Games Geeks Play! srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 4:15pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 5:45am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 5:37am
Story You asked for it, Banshee gets DVD support srlinuxx 28/12/2010 - 3:38am

n/a

Giant Robots And Killer Licenses

Filed under
OSS

Maybe I should have titled this Why you should fear proprietary software. I generally leave pointing people to other stories to . . . er, um, well, other people. These stories, however, highlight so beautifully why open source software, open protocols, and open data formats are so important.

LinuxWorld Analysts Cite Hottest Open Source Trends

Filed under
Linux

What are some of the hottest trends in the Linux/open source market today? Avid activity among some resellers, abundant virtualization, and a growing tendency to mixed open source/proprietary deployments, according to a trio of top industry analysts, who helped to preview LinuxWorld San Francisco in an IDG-sponsored teleconference on Tuesday.

Also: Analysts: What to Look For at LinuxWorld

MythTV and AM2 on Linux war stories, a continuing saga

Filed under
Software

As you may recall from my last entry, I exchanged my cable box from a Scientific Atlanta 8000HD to a Scientific Atlanta 8300HD. The latter, new box continues to output a signal from the cable connection even if I have it in HDTV mode. It probably also continues to output AVI and S-Video. This finally opened up a way for me to use my cable box with a MythTV box.

The new platform maze

Filed under
Hardware

I own an old, quite customised Thinkpad a21m laptop, which I still use intensively when I’m out of town: with 256 Mb of RAM, a 750 MHz Pentium 3 chip and a 1024x768 screen running off an ATI chip, I can run pretty much all recent GNU/Linux distros around. I also have built a nice living-room warmer based off an Athlon64 X2 3800+ with a big, fat hard disk and more RAM than you can shake a stick at (well, almost). Is there a problem here?

Unix or Linux commands for changing user rights

Filed under
HowTos

Recently I received the question via email — “…How do I change user rights under UNIX? I am using Red Hat Enterprise Linux and my background includes Windows network…”

n/a

Ubuntu Linux On Thinkpad T43p: Wow!

Filed under
Ubuntu

After reading report after report of people using Ubuntu Linux on various flavors of desktop and laptop computers, I've finally decided to give it a try.

Emacs tips: Customize your Emacs experience

Filed under
HowTos

One of the principal advantages of Emacs over competing editors is how flexible and customizable it is. In fact, in several other "Emacs tips" columns, you may find references to customizing your setup. It's a big topic, so this is a quick start guide to the fundamentals: the .emacs file and basic customization techniques.

rPath Named as Finalist for LinuxWorld San Francisco 2006 Product Excellence Awards

Filed under
Linux

rPath’s solutions named as finalists in three categories – Best Open Source Solution, Best Utility Grid Computing Solution and Best Virtualization Solution

n/a

KateOS 3.0 Released & Tested

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

KateOS 3.0 was released early this morning and happily Tuxmachines was granted a preview. This release brings lots of new changes as well as a great looking new theme. Performance and stability remain, as always, well above par. KateOS has always been one of our favorite distributions, and this release doesn't change that either. What is new this release?

The cosmonaut's crusade for free computers

Filed under
Ubuntu

What would you do if you'd made £400m in the last tech boom? Relax and take it easy?

Well, for Mark Shuttleworth, the choice was easy, writes Ben King.

Google: the Godfather of Open Source?

Filed under
Google

It's well known that Google runs its vast array of servers using a custom version of GNU/Linux. But this is only one aspect of its support for free software. Others include its Summer of Code, now well established as an incubator of both coding talent and projects, and more recently its open source code repository, which offers a useful alternative to Sourceforge.net. Similarly, in porting Picasa to GNU/Linux, Google has made contributions to Wine, while open source projects in Sri Lanka have been the beneficiaries of more direct help, to the tune of $25,000.

But Google is also operating behind the scenes to bolster free software in other ways.

The ODF debate: A real world view

Filed under
OSS

What exactly is meant by document portability? Does it mean that a document created in one application can be viewed using a different application on another operating system? Does it mean that the document can be viewed and edited within another application on the same or another OS platform? Or does it simply mean that you can be sure that the document you create today can be read in the future using proprietary products from the same software vendor?

GP2X: It's all fun and games

Filed under
Gaming

The GP2X is an open, Linux-based handheld games console manufactured by Game Park Holdings of South Korea. It has a typical handheld control layout, a good quality backlit screen, built-in stereo speakers, headphone socket, and several connectivity and expansion options. My son is completely taken with the device, and it has won me over too. At £125 (or $190), you're not going to find a less expensive handheld device that can be expanded into a full-blown computer.

SPI board drops Perens

Filed under
OSS

Open source developer and evangelist Bruce Perens says he is not overly concerned about being voted off the board of Software in the Public Interest, the non-profit open source organization he founded a decade ago.

User interfaces should teach, not hide

Filed under
Software

Today, I finally decided that my gVim editor needed a smaller font, and the process of getting it to work right has made me notice a fundamental flaw in the way we think about user interfaces. Essentially it’s just this: GUIs should teach, not obfuscate or hide the underlying mechanism.

Discovering Linux - The Experiences of a Linux Newbie

Filed under
Reviews

The concept of open-source, free software is very appealing. Many of the Linux-distros are very good, but I still haven't found one that fits my needs perfectly. Also, my needs will propably change as I become more aquainted to Linux. At this time, my favourite distro is propably Mandriva One, though it would've been Ubuntu if they had had support for restricted formats.

PCLinuxOS 0.93a Junior Available for download

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS 0.93a Junior is our next step up from MiniMe. As you know MiniMe comes with just a basic desktop allowing full user customization. Junior comes with a set of pre-selected programs for Web Browsing, Email, Instant Messaging, Blogging, IRC chat, Music, Graphics, Video (additional software required for encrypted DVD playback and proprietary formats), Digital Camera, Games, Ftp, Bit torrent transfer, CD/DVD burning and more.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Rise of Open Cloud Architecture and Over-the-Top (OTT) Network Services
  • Amazon’s Giving Away the AI Behind Its Product Recommendations
    Amazon has become the latest tech giant that’s giving away some of its most sophisticated technology. Today the company unveiled DSSTNE (pronounced “destiny”), an open source artificial intelligence framework that the company developed to power its product recommendation system. Now any company, researcher, or curious tinkerer can use it for their own AI applications.
  • Genode OS Framework release 16.05
    The current release marks the most profound API revision in the project's history. The new API is designed to reinforce the best practices for implementing Genode components. It is the result of countless experiments and the practical experiences made while developing over hundred genuine components during the past ten years.
  • Old projects and the free-software community
    The Community Leadership Summit (CLS) is an annual event for community managers, developer evangelists, people who work on public-facing forums, and those with a general interest in engagement or community development for free-software projects. The 2016 edition was held in Austin, Texas the weekend before OSCON. Several sessions at CLS 2016 dealt with the differences exhibited between old and new free-software projects where community management is concerned. One of those tackled the problem of how to foster community around an older software project, which poses a distinct set of challenges.
  • Thunderbird powered by SoftMaker
    Thunderbird, powered by SoftMaker, is a custom version of the popular email client featuring enhancements that come all in the form of extensions. [...] SoftMaker, a company best known for its SoftMaker Office suite, announced recently that it plans to include the Thunderbird email client into the 2016 version of the office suite.
  • The Document Liberation Project: What we do
    The Document Liberation Project: empowering creators to free their data from proprietary formats.
  • EMC Releases UniK Software for Cloud and IoT App Deployments
  • Microsoft Research Awards Demonstrate Commitment to Open Source [Ed: Microsoft openwashing and claims to be about research rather than cheating, bribery, witch-hunting etc.]
  • The open-source generation gap
    OSI General Manager Patrick Masson was one of the session's attendees, and he pushed back on that last point. There is too much "open-washing" these days, he said, but it does not come from the OSI. There is still only one Open Source Definition; the dilution of the term comes from others who use "open" to describe organizations, workflows, processes, and other things unrelated to software licensing. "We have open hardware and open data, but also 'open cola' and 'open beer.' That blurs over an important distinction. Not everything fits." [...] Among the other points raised during the session, attendees noted that it was important that the community distinguish between minting new project contributors and minting new free-software activists, and that it was important for projects to put a check on flamewar-style debates—particularly those that focus on dismissing certain technologies. It is easy for experienced developers to become attached to a language or framework, but there will always be new languages and projects popping up that are the entry points for new coders. Project members deriding language Y because it is not language X may only serve to tell newcomers that they are not welcome.
  • A discussion on combining CDDL and GPL code
    Within the context of an event dedicated to discussing free and open-source software (FOSS) legalities, such as the Free Software Legal & Licensing Workshop (LLW), the topic of conflicting licenses was bound to come up. The decision by Canonical to start shipping the ZFS filesystem with its Ubuntu server distribution back in February led to a discussion at LLW about distributing the kernel combined with ZFS. Discussions at LLW are held under the Chatham House Rule, which means that names and affiliations of participants are only available for those who have agreed to be identified. This year's LLW was held in Barcelona, April 13-15.
  • Mobile Age: using mobility and open data to include senior citizens in open government
    Helping older European people to be part of the open government process and encouraging their access to civic participation through mobility are the main goals of the Mobile Age project, launched last February.
  • All European scientific articles to be freely accessible by 2020
    And, according to the new Innovation Principle, new European legislation must take account of its impact on innovation. These are the main outcomes of the meeting of the Competitiveness Council in Brussels on 27 May.
  • Council of the European Union calls for full open access to scientific research by 2020
    A few weeks ago we wrote about how the European Union is pushing ahead its support for open access to EU-funded scientific research and data. Today at the meeting of the Council of the European Union, the Council reinforced the commitment to making all scientific articles and data openly accessible and reusable by 2020.
  • Hackaday Prize Entry: An Interface For The Headless Linux System
    Connecting a headless Raspberry Pi to a wireless network can be quite a paradoxical situation. To connect it to the network, you need to open an SSH connection to configure the wireless port. But to do so, you need a network connection in the first place. Of course, you can still get command-line access using a USB-to-UART adapter or the Pi’s ethernet port – if present – but [Arsenijs] worked out a much more convenient solution for his Hackaday Prize entry: The pyLCI Linux Control Interface.
  • RepRap, Open Source and 3DPrinting
    The RepRap project started in 2005 by Adrian Bowyer – “Mister RepRap”, when the patent about this technology expired. 3DPrintings isn’t a new technology, history dates that the first model of stereolithography printing emerged in 1984. The main idea around RepRap projects is to produce 3DPrinters that can auto-replicate most of the parts itself. And in 2006, the RepRap 0.2 successfully printed the first part of itself and in 2008, the first 3d model was printed by an end-user. Currently, the printer more replicated and customized of the 67 printers that are listed on RepRap website, is the Prusa Mendel, the model created by Josef Průša, that was disponibility to the public in 2011 and had a lot of development since.
  • Here is a web interface for switching on your light
    Like I mentioned in a previous post, I wanted to try out a more hackable wifi plug. I got a Kankun “smart” plug. Like the other one I have the software is horrible. The good news is that they left SSH enabled on it.
  • LeMaker Guitar review
    Anyone who has worked with the Compute Module will find the LeMaker Guitar immediately familiar. The system-on-chip processor, an Actions S500, sits alongside 1GB of memory, a combined audio and power management unit, and 8GB of NAND flash storage on an over-sized small-outline DIMM (SODIMM) form factor circuit board. This board then connects to a baseboard, supplied with the Guitar, which provides more accessible connectivity than the SODIMM’s 204 electrical contacts.
  • Open Source Vs Personal Life — Should GitHub Remove Contribution Graph?
    Should GitHub remove contribution graph from the personal profile of the contributors or the developers? This step might be taken for the personal well-being of the developers. Open source is good but personal life cannot be ignored either.

Leftovers: BSD

Security Leftovers

Red Hat News

  • Why SELinux is inherently complex
    The root of SELinux's problems is that SELinux is a complex security mechanism that is hard to get right. Unfortunately this complexity is not (just) simply an implementation artifact of the current SELinux code; instead, it's inherent in what SELinux is trying to do.
  • SELinux is beyond saving at this point
    SELinux has problems. It has a complexity problem (in that it is quite complex), it has technical problems with important issues like usability and visibility, it has pragmatic problems with getting in the way, and most of all it has a social problem. At this point, I no longer believe that SELinux can be saved and become an important part of the Linux security landscape (at least if Linux remains commonly used). The fundamental reason why SELinux is beyond saving at this point is that after something like a decade of SELinux's toxic mistake, the only people who are left in the SELinux community are the true believers, the people who believe that SELinux is not a sysadmin usability nightmare, that those who disable it are fools, and so on. That your community narrows is what naturally happens when you double down on calling other people things; if people say you are an idiot for questioning the SELinux way, well, you generally leave.
  • Systemd 230 Is Upsetting Some Over Its KillUserProcess Setting
    Systemd 230 was released just last week and it has taken heat not only for opening up FBDEV to potential security issues, which already reverted, but also for changing the default behavior of user processes. Systemd 230 made a change where KillUserProcess defaults to yes. This terminates user processes that are part of the user session scope when the user logs out. This is causing problems for ssh-agent, screen, and other common Linux processes.
  • Basics you must know for RHCSA Exam preparation
  • Test Fedora 24 Beta in an OpenStack cloud
    Although there are a few weeks remaining before Fedora 24 is released, you can test out the Fedora 24 Beta release today! This is a great way to get a sneak peek at new features and help find bugs that still need a fix.
  • State of syslog-ng 3.8 rpm packaging
  • My Fedora Badges intern
    For the past two weeks I was lucky to have an intern, who worked on Fedora Badges. Badges is a great way to start as a Fedora design contributor, as they have low entry level. Templates are ready, graphics is available to download, all the resources available here.