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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Arguments against Linux and the opinion of a non-technical user srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 6:12pm
Story 20 Best KDE Applications srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 6:10pm
Story The Six Biggest Websites On The Internet Compared srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 6:08pm
Story The two faces of UK open source srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 6:06pm
Story Why Does the Linux Desktop So Lack Proprietary Apps? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 5:11pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 409 srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 3:03pm
Story Linux: Not for Lovers? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 3:00pm
Story Ubuntu breaks from the Linux pack srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 2:58pm
Story Do we still need the FSF, GNU and GPL? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 2:56pm
Story MegaGlest Amazing Strategy Game Chris7mas 13/06/2011 - 5:42am

Best Games of 2006

Filed under
Gaming

The last 12 months have proved to be among the most eventful in the history of videogames. Lots of videogames proved themselves to be must-have purchases but which ones have been selected by our panel of experts?

Virtual Linux

Filed under
Linux

Virtualization means many things to many people. A big focus of virtualization currently is server virtualization, or the hosting of multiple independent operating systems on a single host computer. This article explores the ideas behind virtualization and then discusses some of the many ways to implement virtualization. We also look at some of the other virtualization technologies out there, such as operating system virtualization on Linux.

Directory Services as the Foundation of Organizational Infrastures

Filed under
Software

If you have followed any of my last six installments about LDAP, then you know we've taken a technical approach to the subject. I wrote the majority of the material in this series as part of an O'Reilly book entitled "Linux System Administration" or simply LSA. I just wanted to make you aware of the possibilities.

Knoppix v5.1.0 LiveCD Screenshots

Filed under
Linux

In time for the new year, Knoppix 5.1.0 has been released. Even with Windows users, Knoppix is an incredibly GNU/Linux LiveCD that offers a great deal of desktop functionality and features.

Linux hard drive benchmark & bottleneck testing software suite for performance

Filed under
HowTos

The stress test of hardware (hard drive benchmarks) is a simplistic test. There are a number of benchmarking applications software that can be used as hard disk (storage) stress testing. My favorite is Bonnie++ software.

How to install 3D-Desktop using Beryl

Filed under
HowTos

Windows Vista provides two entirely new features to manage windows using Windows Flip and Windows Flip 3D. Linux is already using this technology. 3D-Desktop is an OpenGL program for switching virtual desktops in a seamless 3-dimensional manner on Linux. This workshop describes the 3D Desktop installation on Mandriva 2007 using Beryl and Nvidia graphics cards.

Windows screwup forces Ubuntu shift

Filed under
Ubuntu

YOU NEVER QUITE wrap your head around how anti-consumer Microsoft's policies are until they bite you in the bum. Add in the customer antagonistic policies of its patsies, HP in this case, and vendors like Promise, and you have quite a recipe for pain. Guess what I did today?

'$100 laptop' software may prove revolutionary

Filed under
Misc

Forget windows, folders and boxes that pop up with text. When students in Thailand, Libya and other developing countries get their $150 computers from the One Laptop Per Child project in 2007, their experience will be unlike anything on standard PCs.

Amarok Weekly News Issue 4 Released

Filed under
Software

Late but worthy -- that's how one can call this issue of Amarok Weekly News. It talks about new or updated Amarok features, and continues to provide tips and links to interesting scripts. As a bonus, kind of a New Year gift, we provide you an experimental RSS feed, for your pleasure. Enjoy!

Float your conky

Filed under
HowTos

Just about every conky setup I see has it pegged to the desktop, immovable and locked into place. To that end, I cooked up a .conkyrc that I can use the ALT key and the left mouse button (the standard window drag combo) to move conky around the desktop.

Enterprise Linux 2006--A Year Of Deals

Filed under
Linux

In the enterprise Linux space, 2006 was marked by greater expansion of Linux into vertical markets, new products, and most notably, a string of surprise business deals among vendors. The year also bore witness to an increasing trend, of sorts, among Novell, Oracle, and other software companies to justify their actions on the basis of "customer demand."

Ubuntu User's Open Letter to Free Software Foundation

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Free Software Foundation is recommending gNewSense and Ututo as beginners' Linux distributions. Ubuntu user and member Ryan Lortie has written an Open Letter to the FSF raising some big points dealing with the goals of the FSF and how to accomplish them. We bring you the full text.

Linux That Looks Like Windows: Bad!

Filed under
Linux

A few articles have appeared recently discussing the copying of the Windows interface to Linux to ease user migration, such as this one. This is nothing new - Windows-like Linux desktop environments such as LXP and xpde have been in existence for a few months/years. I think these projects are great because the developers are enjoying their work and I’m sure that some people use their products, but I don’t believe that this is the right way to attract Windows users to desktop Linux.

Suse 10.2, parts 6 & 7

Filed under
SUSE

Beagle is Gnome's answer to built-in desktop indexing and search. The heart of Beagle appears to be beagled, the Beagle daemon. I went out earlier today to run a number of errands leaving europa on and running with openSuse. When I returned home several hours later, I came back to an unresponsive machine.

Also: Media support, mixed at best

Installing OpenBSD for the first time

Filed under
BSD
HowTos

There are dozens of ways to install OpenBSD. The following tasks will help you install OpenBSD on an i386-compatible computer for the first time, using one of the most common scenarios.

The Buzz About Aldrin

Filed under
Software

For the past month I've been building and playing with Leonard 'paniq' Ritter's Aldrin, a music production system that combines a tracker-style composition interface with audio synthesis and processing modules called machines.

Comparing remote backup options

Filed under
HowTos

I have always been interested in backups. Most recently, I have been trying to decide how to best implement the concept of "Separation". This requires that I store my data in multiple geographic locations to prevent a local disaster from destroying all copies of my data.

Also: The easy way to resize hard drive partitions

Suse 10.2, part 5: Fixing an annoying boot splash screen

Filed under
SUSE

When you first start Suse Linux, you're presented with a Grub splash screen menu that allows you to select between one or more boot options. If you're like me, you've got at least four; Windows XP, openSuse 10.2, floppy, and openSuse 10.2 failsafe. The problem with the current boot screen is somebody decided it would be cool to have the bland blue Suse boot screen 'randomly' trade places with a penguin-themed boot screen background, complete with running and tumbling penguins.

Using mixmaster to send anonymous email

Filed under
HowTos

This is a document that explains how to install mixmaster and how to use it to send email. Mixmaster is described by the debian package system as An anonymous remailer is a computer service that privatizes your email. A remailer allows you to send electronic mail to a Usenet news group or to a person without the recipient knowing your name or your email address. Anonymous remailers provide protection against traffic analysis.

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More in Tux Machines

Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years. Read more

Rise of the Forks: Nextcloud and LibreOffice

  • ownCloud-Forked Nextcloud 10 Now Available
  • Secure, Monitor and Control your data with Nextcloud 10 – get it now!
    Nextcloud 10 is now available with many new features for system administrators to control and direct the flow of data between users on a Nextcloud server. Rule based file tagging and responding to these tags as well as other triggers like physical location, user group, file properties and request type enables administrators to specifically deny access to, convert, delete or retain data following business or legal requirements. Monitoring, security, performance and usability improvements complement this release, enabling larger and more efficient Nextcloud installations. You can get it on our install page or read on for details.
  • What makes a great Open Source project?
    Recently the Document Foundation has published its annual report for the year 2015. You can download it as a pdf by following this link, and you can now even purchase a paper copy of the report. This publication gives me the opportunity to talk a bit about what I think makes a great FOSS project and what I understand may be a great community. If it is possible to see this topic as something many people already went over and over again, think again: Free & Open Source Software is seen as having kept and even increased its momentum these past few years, with many innovative companies developing and distributing software licensed under a Free & Open Source license from the very beginning. This trend indicates two important points: FOSS is no longer something you can automagically use as a nice tag slapped on a commodity software; and FOSS projects cannot really be treated as afterthoughts or “nice-to-haves”. Gone are the days where many vendors could claim to be sympathetic and even supportive to FOSS but only insofar as their double-digits forecasted new software solution would not be affected by a cumbersome “community of developers”. Innovation relies on, starts with, runs thanks to FOSS technologies and practices. One question is to wonder what comes next. Another one is to wonder why Open Source is still seen as a complex maze of concepts and practices by so many in the IT industry. This post will try to address one major difficulty of FOSS: why do some projects fail while others succeed.

Red Hat News

  • Red Hat Virtualisation 4 woos VMware faithful
    It is easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn’t forgotten about you. Red Hat Virtualisation (RHV) 4.0 refreshes Red Hat’s open source virtualisation platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat’s product line. It is a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat’s virtualisation efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company’s intention to woo VMware customers.
  • Forbes Names Red Hat One of the World's Most Innovative Companies
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it has been named to Forbes' “World’s Most Innovative Companies” list. Red Hat was ranked as the 25th most innovative company in the world, marking the company's fourth appearance on the list (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Red Hat was named to Forbes' "World's Most Innovative Growth Companies" list in 2011.
  • Is this Large Market Cap Stock target price reasonable for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • World Wide Web became what it is thanks to Linux
    Linux is used to power the largest websites on the Internet, including Google, Facebook, Amazon, eBay, and Wikipedia.
  • SFC's Kuhn in firing line as Linus Torvalds takes aim
    A few days after he mused that there had been no reason for him to blow his stack recently, Linux creator Linus Torvalds has directed a blast at the Software Freedom Conservancy and its distinguished technologist Bradley Kuhn over the question of enforcing compliance of the GNU General Public Licence. Torvalds' rant came on Friday, as usual on a mailing list and on a thread which was started by Software Freedom Conservancy head Karen Sandler on Wednesday last week. She suggested that Linuxcon in Toronto, held from Monday to Thursday, also include a session on GPL enforcement.
  • Linux at 25: A pictorial history
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.