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Tuesday, 25 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Simplified Mandatory Access Control Kernel

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "Smack is the Simplified Mandatory Access Control Kernel," Casey Schaufler said posting the third version of his patchest. He explained, "Smack implements mandatory access control (MAC) using labels attached to tasks and data containers, including files, SVIPC, and other tasks. Smack is a kernel based scheme that requires an absolute minimum of application support and a very small amount of configuration data."

Improving checkpatch

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "This version brings a number of new checks, and a number of bug fixes," Andy Whitcroft noted in his announcement for version 0.10 of checkpatch.pl, used by Linux kernel developers to scan their code for common mistakes. Ingo Molnar expressed concern, "your checkpatch patch itself produces 22 warnings."

Main Menue Applet: Preferences and Administration

Filed under
Software

The gnome main menu applet was created as another effort for people to try and use awn and get rid of all their gnome bars. Well as another stride in this direction more has been added to this applet.

KDE Commit-Digest for 30th September 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Beginnings of a list view, and an applet browser integrated into Plasma. Optimisations in Konqueror. More work, including image practice support in Parley. XMP metadata support in Digikam, with new splashscreens announced.

Jews, Gentiles, and the Open Source Definition

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: On the one hand, you have the free software purists (of which I'm increasingly part) who demand strict adherence to The Law (of open source). On the other, you have a growing "gentile" body of open-source converts, some of which don't want to have to live by old-school "ordinances" of open source.

Did you ever wonder..?

Filed under
OSS

oneandoneis2: There's an interesting article linked from places like Linux Devices and Linux Watch on the whole GPL v2 / GPL v3 thing. But it reminded my of something I wondered about a while ago: Namely, if software companies had had more faith in copyright in the early days, would GNU or Linux ever have happened?

Linux means community also

Filed under
Linux

linuxgeeksunited.blogspot: One of the most common conversations when people discuss Linux is the freedom it brings. One thing that doesn't get discussed a lot though, when talking about Linux is community.

Linux distribution

Filed under
Linux

mintlinux.blogspot: A Linux distribution, often simply distribution or distro, is a member of the Linux family of Unix-like operating systems comprising the Linux kernel, the non-kernel parts of the GNU operating system, and assorted other software. Because most (if not all) of the kernel and software packages are free and open source, Linux distributions have taken a wide variety of forms.

Linux channel support boost

Filed under
Linux

itp.net: The regional Linux market has received a major boost after open source leader Red Hat committed itself to opening a regional support centre for the Middle East before the end of the year.

Also: Red Hat Changes Marketing Chief

Bluefish - Linux just gets better.

Filed under
Ubuntu

webologist.co.uk: I have installed several new applications on my Ubuntu system this weekend, but only now it struck me that it now actually seems easier to install application on Linux than on Windows.

Loop-based Music Composition With Linux, Pt. 2

Filed under
Software

Linux Journal: In this second and final part I'll demonstrate some of the loop-specific tools I've found in Ardour, Reaper, and Audacity. Tutorials and links to project demos are included, so warm up your headphones and let's get loopy.

Open Source: TinyMe

Filed under
Linux

fareast.linuxdiary.com: If you are interested in getting that really old machine up and running again, with as little as ~32MB of ram, then there is a shiny new competitor to PuppyLinux and Damn Small Linux: TinyMe.

Desktop tune-up. Four cool Linux tricks

Filed under
Linux

tectonic: Kick-start your week with four easy (but still cool) tricks on your Linux desktop. Install the media server you've always wanted but never got around to doing, or fine-tune your hardware to squeeze out a few more hours of battery power ... All this an more in this week's How To Roundup.

Top Ten Side Effects of Switching to Linux

Filed under
Linux

Linux Online: Studies done by a prestigious think tank in Silicon Valley have identified the most common behavioral changes in people who have switched to Linux. They were nice enough to share their information with us.

Portables to power PC industry

Filed under
OLPC

BBC: The XO laptop may have been created to help children in developing nations, but its influence is likely to be felt far beyond the classroom. The PC industry is going to be among the first to feel its impact in November 2007 when, for a week, the gadget goes on sale to almost anyone that wants one.

Windows vs. Ubuntu

Filed under
OS

alatinworld.blogspot: I, for one, am a fan of Windows and Microsoft through and through. The other day, however, I was having computer problems when a technician told me that I should back up everything on my computer because it sounded like my copy of Windows had been damaged.

Cuba's Move Toward Freedom, as in Software

Filed under
OSS

Linux Insider: The Cuban government proclaimed its intention to exchange its computer operating systems for free software in 2005, but the state agencies that are in charge of the switch have done little to make it happen.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • PyMOTW: copy

  • HeX: Full Screen Terminal
  • Howto make Ubuntu to read feeds for you
  • Fixing the Ubuntu Gutsy boot splash issue

Linux and Me, Part 3: Software and Virtualization

Filed under
Linux

carsonspost.wordpress: This is the third post in a series where I examine experience with the Linux Operating System. This post will have a look at the software that I have found available to the Linux user, comparing it to what is available on Windows, and what to do when you need that Windows program but are running Linux.

Why GPLv3 Will Supplant GPLv2

Filed under
OSS

linux journal: Some evidence suggests that GPLv3 uptake is coming along nicely, while other reports indicate a reluctance to adopt it (but note also Matt Asay's neat reconciliation of these contradictory messages). To see what's likely to happen in the long term, it's useful to look back at the past history of licence adoption.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat After Graphics People

GNOME News

  • Desk Changer is a Wallpaper Slideshow Extension for GNOME
    Have you been looking for a GNOME wallpaper slideshow extension? If so, you can stop. In the comments to our recent post on the way GNOME handles wallpapers a number of readers asked whether GNOME had an image slideshow feature built in, without the need for third-party apps and the like. The answer is yes, GNOME does. Sort of.
  • Minwaita: A Compact Version of Theme Adwaita for Gnome Desktop
    As you may already know that Ubuntu is switching back to Gnome, this is the transition time for Ubuntu to switch back. Some creators are motivated and creating themes for Gnome desktop, which is a good thing and hopefully we shall see plenty of Gnome themes and icons around soon. As its name shows "Minwaita" it is minimal/compact version of Adwaita theme, the theme is available after some enhancements to make Gnome more sleek and more vanilla Gnome experience without moving to away from Adwaita's design. This theme is compatible with Gnome 3.20 and up versions. This theme was released back in November, 2016 and still in continuous development that means if you find any problem or bug in the theme then report it to get it fixed in the next update. Obsidian-1 icons used in the following screenshots.
  • Gnome Pomodoro Timer Can Help You Increase Productivity
    If you are struggling with focus on something, it could be your work or study then try Pomodoro technique, this method developed by Francesco Cirillo in the late 1980s. The technique uses a timer to break down work into intervals, traditionally 25 minutes in length, separated by short breaks. You can read more about Pomodoro here.
  • Widget hierarchies in GTK+ 4.0
    In GTK+3, only GtkContainer subclasses can have child widgets. This makes a lot of sense for “public” container children like we know them, e.g. GtkBox — i.e. the developer can add, remove and reorder child widgets arbitrarily and the container just does layout.

Red Hat News

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian