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Sunday, 23 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: Virtualisation

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: Some changes in openSUSE 10.3 have ensured that if you are interested in just about any type of popular virtualisation, then openSUSE is the operating system to be on. From Xen to VirtualBox, QEMU and KVM — it’s all availabe in the new version. Today we’ll be going through a few of these.

Local open-source provider thrives

Filed under
Linux

dailytarheel.com: The world's largest provider of Linux-based open-source software is based in Raleigh and has a workforce that draws heavily from the Triangle's technology-savvy workforce.

Windows alternatives gain ground

Filed under
SUSE

theglobeandmail.com: Last winter, when it was time to upgrade its Windows 98 and 2000 operating systems Whitelaw Twining, a boutique law firm in Vancouver, instead chose Novell's SUSE, a version of Linux.

Gadget retailer IWOOT goes open source

Filed under
SUSE

ITPro: Online gadget specialist I Want One of Those (IWOOT) has chosen to deploy SUSE Linux Enterprise Server from Novell as part of its ongoing open source strategy.

A clearlooks popsquares desktop

Filed under
HowTos

kmandla.wordpress: A long time ago I was messing with xscreensaver and found you could paint the root window — the desktop — with a screensaver, and use it like an animated wallpaper image. I was experimenting with them on the Thinkpad today, and this time I set popsquares to use Tango colors.

Open source geeks asked to 'stand up and be counted'

Filed under
OSS

builder.au: Australians working with open source software are urged to participate in an online census launched this week to discover the capabilities of the local industry.

New payment service now works with Linux

Filed under
Linux

tectonic: South African payment gateway service, MyGate, have developed a service that allows e-commerce merchants running Linux to access credit card security services that were developed for Windows platforms.

Finding Bugs With CFS

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: A potential bug reported against the Completely Fair Scheduler suggested that it was causing a network slowdown, measured with the 'Iperf' bandwidth performance benchmarking tool. The performance hit was quickly tracked to the previously discussed changes in how CFS handles sched_yield().

Enable Automatic Time Synchronization In Ubuntu And Kubuntu

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HowTos

watchingthenet: If you are running KDE in Kubuntu or Gnome in Ubuntu, you can easily set up the clock to synchronize the time to any time source on the Internet. Doing so will keep the time on your System accurate and keep you from missing any appointments!

Making a backup reminder script

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HowTos

linux.com: I like to back up the data on my laptop computer as often as possible, just in case I have trouble with it. I have some large files on the laptop that prevent me from scheduling an Internet backup to my home machine, so I have written a script that reminds me to periodically plug in an external USB drive; then upon clicking continue, the reminder script runs my custom backup script.

Can Ubuntu Linux replace Windows Vista for consumers?

Filed under
OS

techlogg.com: But upon using Ubuntu for the first few days, I felt I’d stumbled on this utopian world where software wasn’t about companies check up on you and give you passwords and licenses, it was about creativity, about collaboration.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Hand-Me-Down Linux: The Notebook Edition

  • What else did Evans survey say?
  • Alexander Wolfe: In Debate Over Desktop Linux, It All Comes Down To Money
  • Gauging Microsoft threat to Europe's Linux users
  • SELinux — is it *really* too complex?
  • OLPC revisited - a skeptics view
  • Open source vs. proprietary software bugs: which get squashed fastest?

Technical Advisory Board Election Results

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: James Bottomley announced the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board election results from September 5th, "sorry this has taken so long to get out ... I just, er, forgot." He noted that there were eight candidates.

Creating dynamic swap space

Filed under
HowTos

debian administration: When a GNU/Linux machine runs out of physical memory it will start to use any configured swap-space. This is usually a sign of trouble as swap files and partitions are significantly slower to access than physical memory, however having some swap is generally better than having none at all. Using a dynamic system can ease the maintainance of this size.

The trouble with artwork and free software licenses

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Are you a crafter of icons, sounds, backgrounds and splash screens, or even window manager themes? Selecting the right license for your artwork to coexist with free software is no trivial task.

Also: Artwork/Incoming/GutsyIdeas

Linux Mint Celena - Initial review

Filed under
Linux

techzone: The download was slick and the LiveCD booted to a very impressive looking desktop. The artwork was awesome, I was simply bowled over. However, an error popped up informing me that Linux Mint Menu has quit unexpectedly.

Novell's Linux business spikes since Microsoft deal

Filed under
SUSE

computerworld: Novell's Linux business has soared 243 percent since last November when the company signed its controversial deal with Microsoft. And, that growth doesn't seem to be short-lived.

Linspire adds paid support option to Freespire

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Linspire has announced the immediate availability of its first commercial paid support offerings for Freespire 2.0 users. Linspire has now made competitively priced paid support options available at its Freespire support site.

Sabayonlinux: How things are going

Filed under
Linux

planet.sabayonlinux.org: Well, this morning I was thinking that I need to blog a little bit more, so here I am. Things are going well on the Sabayon side, we released a nearly perfect miniEdition last week and that’s a good thing from the QA side. Talking about future releases:

openSUSE 10.3 RC 1 Report

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE
-s

OpenSUSE 10.3 final is due out in just a few days, so let's take a look at the progress. Folks have been testing this release candidate and posting their thoughts here and there. My own testing was delayed primarily due to the some of the joys of running Gentoo fulltime, but I was finally able to devote my full attention to openSUSE 10.3 RC1. As per my usual, I downloaded the DVD iso delta. This time it was 422 MB. I don't usually test everything with these developmental releases, but what I have tested is looking good.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

  • Debian Developers Make Progress With RISC-V Port
    Debian developers continue making progress with a -- currently unofficial -- port of their Linux operating system to RISC-V. There is a in-progress Debian GNU/Linux port to RISC-V along with a repository with packages built for RISC-V. RISC-V for the uninitiated is a promising, open-source ISA for CPUs. So far there isn't any widely-available RISC-V hardware, but there are embedded systems in the works while software emulators are available.
  • 2×08: Pique Oil
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 KDE
  • deepin 15.4 Released, With Download Link & Mirrors
    deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux operating system has been released at April 19th 2017. I list here one official download link and two faster mirrors from Sourceforge. I listed here the Mega and Google mirrors as well but remember they don't provide direct download. The 15.4 provided only as 64 bit, the 32 bit version has already dropped (except by commercial support). I hope this short list helps you.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Overlayfs snapshots
    At the 2017 Vault storage conference, Amir Goldstein gave a talk about using overlayfs in a novel way to create snapshots for the underlying filesystem. His company, CTERA Networks, has used the NEXT3 ext3-based filesystem with snapshots, but customers want to be able to use larger filesystems than those supported by ext3. Thus he turned to overlayfs as a way to add snapshots for XFS and other local filesystems. NEXT3 has a number of shortcomings that he wanted to address with overlayfs snapshots. Though it only had a few requirements, which were reasonably well supported, NEXT3 never got upstream. It was ported to ext4, but his employer stuck with the original ext3-based system, so the ext4 version was never really pushed for upstream inclusion.
  • Five days and counting
    It is five days left until foss-north 2017, so it is high time to get your ticket! Please notice that tickets can be bought all the way until the night of the 25th (Tuesday), but catering is only included is you get your ticket on the 24th (Monday), so help a poor organizer and get your tickets as soon as possible!
  • OpenStack Radium? Maybe…but it could be Formidable
    OK the first results are in from the OpenStack community naming process for the R release. The winner at this point is Radium.
  • Libreboot Wants Back Into GNU
    Early this morning, Libreboot’s lead developer Leah Rowe posted a notice to the project’s website and a much longer post to the project’s subreddit, indicating that she would like to submit (or resubmit, it’s not clear how that would work at this point) the project to “rejoin the GNU Project.” The project had been a part of GNU from May 14 through September 15 of last year, at which time Ms. Rowe very publicly removed the project from GNU while making allegations of misdeeds by both GNU and the Free Software Foundation. Earlier this month, Rowe admitted that she had been dealing with personal issues at the time and had overreacted. The project also indicated that it had reorganized and that Rowe was no longer in full control.
  • Understanding the complexity of copyleft defense

    The fundamental mechanism defending software freedom is copyleft, embodied in GPL. GPL, however, functions only through upholding it--via GPL enforcement. For some, enforcement has been a regular activity for 30 years, but most projects don't enforce: they live with regular violations. Today, even under the Community Principles of GPL Enforcement, GPL enforcement is regularly criticized and questioned. The complex landscape is now impenetrable for developers who wish their code to remain forever free. This talk provides basic history and background information on the topic.

  • After Bill Gates Backs Open Access, Steve Ballmer Discovers The Joys Of Open Data
    A few months ago, we noted that the Gates Foundation has emerged as one of the leaders in requiring the research that it funds to be released as open access and open data -- an interesting application of the money that Bill Gates made from closed-source software. Now it seems that his successor as Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer, has had a similar epiphany about openness. Back in 2001, Ballmer famously called GNU/Linux "a cancer". Although he later softened his views on software somewhat, that was largely because he optimistically claimed that the threat to Microsoft from free software was "in the rearview mirror". Not really: today, the Linux-based Android has almost two orders of magnitude more market share than Windows Phone.
  • New Open Door Policy for GitHub Developer Program
    GitHub has opened the doors on its three year old GitHub Developer Program. As of Monday, developers no longer need to have paid accounts to participate. "We're opening the program up to all developers, even those who don't have paid GitHub accounts," the company announced in a blog post. "That means you can join the program no matter which stage of development you're in,"
  • MuleSoft Joins the OpenAPI Initiative: The End of the API Spec Wars
    Yesterday, MuleSoft, the creators of RAML, announced that they have joined the Open API Initiative. Created by SmartBear Software and based on the wildly popular Swagger Specification, the OpenAPI Initiative is a Linux Foundation project with over 20 members, including Adobe, IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Salesforce.