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About Tux Machines

Wednesday, 28 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 1 14/08/2011 - 7:57am
Story Mate review on Arch Linux srlinuxx 14/08/2011 - 3:22am
Story Installing Aptosid on the Asus A53E-XN1 srlinuxx 14/08/2011 - 3:13am
Story How Linux handles hardware problems srlinuxx 14/08/2011 - 2:20am
Story Three Quake like drop-down terminals for Linux mcasperson 14/08/2011 - 1:03am
Story Firefox 7 Might Use 50 to 75 Percent More Memory srlinuxx 2 13/08/2011 - 9:52pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04 vs Windows 7 vs OS X 10.7 srlinuxx 13/08/2011 - 6:54pm
Story openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 188 is out srlinuxx 13/08/2011 - 6:49pm
Story Manage Your Twitter & Identi.ca Accounts With Choqok srlinuxx 13/08/2011 - 6:45pm
Story PCLinuxOS Zen Mini 2011 Review srlinuxx 13/08/2011 - 6:40pm

Windows Vista, The best thing that ever happened to Linux?

Filed under
OS

Microsoft Windows Vista has hit town in a big way, with worldwide release parties, massive media attention and plenty of controversy. It has been five years since Microsoft released Windows XP and a lot has changed, Microsoft needs a big win with Vista and they are pulling out all the stops. Microsoft however have taken many risks and the next six months could be very telling.

SCO vs Groklaw's Pamela Jones

Filed under
Legal

For three and a half years, a blogger named Pamela Jones has led a relentless online crusade against software maker SCO Group. Now the Lindon, Utah, software company is fighting back by seeking to take a deposition from Jones.

Graphical Redesign of PCLinuxOS for 2007

Filed under
PCLOS

PCLinuxOS has been steadily improving since its initial release. It is always great to watch the progress a distrobution can make with a dedicated and professional team behind the scenes. PCLinuxOS is no exception and its next big release, currently in beta, promises to deliver a powerful new OS.

Mark Shuttleworth: Accessibility building momentum

Filed under
Software

I was really pleased to read about an accessibility review of ORCA in a KDE blog post. It’s a pointer to a bit of study on the integration of ORCA in Gnome and the good news is, it’s really very positive. Thanks to super work on AT-SPI, a11y is starting to shape up on the Linux desktop, and the source of the blog post suggests that BOTH the desktop heavyweights care about it.

IM Clients for Linux

Filed under
Software

If you use Linux, there are a lot of Instant Messaging clients for you to choose from. And this is not an easy choice at all. There is the features vs stability problem all the time. In order to simplify your choice, I've decided to come up with the most know.

…they’re brewing up some polish…

Filed under
SUSE

I’m inspecting easly internal betas of the first service pack for SLED10, and it’s looking very cool. Before getting into some of its features, I want to give a little preview what apparently will be an overall theme for the service pack: stupendous amounts of polish.

Red Hat joins the Vendor Interop Alliance: Much ado about...?

Filed under
Linux

Today Red Hat announced that has joined the Vendor Interop Alliance, the group that Microsoft chartered with other top software companies, but which has not involved Red Hat to date.

A big thank you to the Ubuntu Technical Board

Filed under
Ubuntu

I was *very* pleasantly pleased to read about a decision by the Ubuntu Technical Board to exclude proprietary drivers by default in Ubuntu. I agree 100% with their reasoning, and 100% with the way that it will be implemented.

Penguins Descend On NYC For LinuxWorld

Filed under
Linux

This year's gathering of LinuxWorld, East Coast Edition is very different than its predecessors. For starters, the event is in New York City. Moreover, the event isn't even your standard LinuxWorld and bears the long moniker of LinuxWorld Open Solutions Summit.

Novell and Microsoft swing both ways

Filed under
SUSE

The possibilities for recursive virtualisation have just increased, with Novell and Intel announcing that you can now run Windows unmodified on Novell's SUSE Linux, via Xen and an Intel VT-capable processor, while Microsoft says an upcoming service pack will let its Virtual Server run SUSE Linux as a virtualised guest.

Also: Europeans don't care for virtualisation

Ubuntu Migration Manager

Filed under
Software

Still in an early stage of development, but hopefully ready for Feisty Fawn. Yesterday Migration-assistant 0.3.1 was uploaded to main and the accompanying changes were merged into Ubiquity.

Klik: the un-packaging system

Filed under
Linux

Klik is unique among software installation systems for Linux, in that each package installed through klik is self-contained, isolated from the rest of the operating system. Klik isn't a package management system; rather it's an application that lets you download and run software without installing it.

Read more

Review: Frets on Fire

Filed under
Gaming

You suck on electric guitar. If you are not aware of that now, you will be after playing Frets on Fire -- a cross-platform, GPLed music game from Unreal Voodoo, where your PC's keyboard is the instrument and you play lead.

Read more

Make move to open source

Filed under
Linux

With the launch of Microsoft's Vista operating system Jan. 30, I can't help but wonder why people have such unrelenting faith in the faulted system. I wonder why more people haven't heard of a sexy little Finnish operating system called Linux, a free, highly compatible, highly functional system for which there exist only 40 known viruses.

Network-Attached Storage With FreeNAS

Filed under
BSD
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can set up a network-attached storage server with FreeNAS. FreeNAS is based on the FreeBSD operating system and supports CIFS (samba), FTP, NFS, RSYNC, SSH, local user authentication, and software RAID (0, 1, 5). It comes with a powerful web interface and uses very little space on the hard drive - about 32MB.

KateOS 3.2: Installation Made Easy

Filed under
Linux

In a recent blog entry I mentioned that one of my favorite relatively unheard of Linux distributions was KateOS. Well, this morning I woke up to find out that a new Beta release of KateOS Live is now available.

Big Linux users pay cash to Microsoft, claims bloke

Filed under
Microsoft

CUSTOMERS USING Linux are paying a kind of "protection money" to Microsoft to prevent them being sued over Volish code which is allegedly under the bonnet, a guy has alleged.

Open source software lets Genuitec forgo venture capital

Filed under
OSS

One business that relies heavily on open source software is Genuitec, the company that produces the proprietary subscription-based MyEclipse interactive development environment. Low-cost MyEclipse adds functionality to Eclipse, an open source application development software framework. Genuitec co-founder and Vice President of Technology Todd Williams says his company is able to keep prices affordable because it avoided using venture capital money, and because Genuitec itself is built completely on open source.

First Look: BOSS - The Indianized Linux

Filed under
Linux

BOSS is Linux operating system distribution, brought to you by CDAC to address your Indic Computing problems. It incorporates all kinds of Indic language resources.

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More in Tux Machines

Networking and Security

  • FAQ: What's so special about 802.11ad Wi-Fi?
    Here are the broad strokes about 802.11ad, the wireless technology that’s just starting to hit the market.
  • 2.5 and 5 Gigabit Ethernet Now Official Standards
    In 2014, multiple groups started efforts to create new mid-tier Ethernet speeds with the NBASE-T Alliance starting in October 2014 and MGBASE-T Alliance getting started a few months later in December 2014. While those groups started out on different paths, the final 802.3bz standard represents a unified protocol that is interoperable across multiple vendors. The promise of 2.5 and 5 Gbps Ethernet is that they can work over existing Cat5 cabling, which to date has only been able to support 1 Gbps. Now with the 802.3bz standard, organizations do not need to rip and replace cabling to get Ethernet that is up to five times faster. "Now, the 1000BASE-T uplink from the wireless to wired network is no longer sufficient, and users are searching for ways to tap into higher data rates without having to overhaul the 70 billion meters of Cat5e / Cat6 wiring already sold," David Chalupsky, board of directors of the Ethernet Alliance and Intel principal engineer, said in a statement. "IEEE 802.3bz is an elegant solution that not only addresses the demand for faster access to rapidly rising data volumes, but also capitalizes on previous infrastructure investments, thereby extending their life and maximizing value."
  • A quick fix for stupid password reset questions
    It didn’t take 500 million hacked Yahoo accounts to make me hate, hate, hate password reset questions (otherwise known as knowledge-based authentication or KBA). It didn't help when I heard that password reset questions and answers -- which are often identical, required, and reused on other websites -- were compromised in that massive hack, too. Is there any security person or respected security guidance that likes them? They are so last century. What is your mother’s maiden name? What is your favorite color? What was your first pet’s name?
  • French hosting provider hit by DDoS close to 1TBps
    A hosting provider in France has been hit by a distributed denial of service attack that went close to one terabyte per second. Concurrent attacks against OVH clocked in at 990GBps. The attack vector is said to be the same Internet-of-Things botnet of 152,464 devices that brought down the website of security expert Brian Krebs. OVH chief technology officer Octave Klaba tweeted that the network was capable of attacks up to 1.5TBps.
  • Latest IoT DDoS Attack Dwarfs Krebs Takedown At Nearly 1Tbps Driven By 150K Devices
    If you thought that the massive DDoS attack earlier this month on Brian Krebs’ security blog was record-breaking, take a look at what just happened to France-based hosting provider OVH. OVH was the victim of a wide-scale DDoS attack that was carried via network of over 152,000 IoT devices. According to OVH founder and CTO Octave Klaba, the DDoS attack reached nearly 1 Tbps at its peak. Of those IoT devices participating in the DDoS attack, they were primarily comprised of CCTV cameras and DVRs. Many of these types devices' network settings are improperly configured, which leaves them ripe for the picking for hackers that would love to use them to carry our destructive attacks.

Android Leftovers

  • Goodbye QWERTY: BlackBerry stops making hardware
    BlackBerry CEO John Chen has been hinting at this move for almost a year now: today BlackBerry announced it will no longer design hardware. Say goodbye to all the crazy hardware QWERTY devices, ultra-wide phones, and unique slider designs. Speaking to investors, BlackBerry CEO John Chen described the move as a "pivot to software," saying, "The company plans to end all internal hardware development and will outsource that function to partners. This allows us to reduce capital requirements and enhance return on invested capital." The "Outsourcing to partners" plan is something we've already seen with the "BlackBerry" DTEK50, which was just a rebranded Alcatel Idol 4. Chen is now betting the future of the company on software, saying, "In Q2, we more than doubled our software revenue year over year and delivered the highest gross margin in the company's history. We also completed initial shipments of BlackBerry Radar, an end-to-end asset tracking system, and signed a strategic licensing agreement to drive global growth in our BBM consumer business." BlackBerry never effectively responded to the 2007 launch of the iPhone and the resulting transition to modern touchscreen smartphones. BlackBerry took swings with devices like the BlackBerry Storm in 2008, its first touchscreen phone; and the BlackBerry Z10 in 2013, the first BlackBerry phone with an OS designed for touch, but neither caught on. BlackBerry's first viable competitor to the iPhone didn't arrive until it finally switched to Android in 2015 with the BlackBerry Priv. It was the first decent BlackBerry phone in some time, but the high price and subpar hardware led to poor sales.
  • Oracle's 'Gamechanger' Evidence Really Just Evidence Of Oracle Lawyers Failing To Read
    Then on to the main show: Oracle's claim that Google hid the plans to make Android apps work on Chrome OS. Google had revealed to Oracle its "App Runtime for Chrome" (ARC) setup, and it was discussed by Oracle's experts, but at Google I/O, Google revealed new plans for apps to run in Chrome OS that were not using ARC, but rather a brand new setup, which Google internally referred to as ARC++. Oracle argued that Google only revealed to them ARC, but not ARC++ and that was super relevant to the fair use argument, because it showed that Android was replacing more than just the mobile device market for Java. But, here's Oracle's big problem: Google had actually revealed to Oracle the plans for ARC++. It appears that Oracle's lawyers just missed that fact. Ouch.
  • Understanding Android's balance between openness and security
    At the 2016 Structure Security conference, Google's Adrian Ludwig talked about the balance between keeping Android as open as possible, while also keeping it secure.
  • Google's Nougat Android update hits the sweet spot: Software 'isn't flashy, but still pretty handy'
    Nougat, Google's latest update of its Android smartphone software, isn't particularly flashy; you might not even notice what's different about it at first. But it offers a number of practical time-saving features, plus a few that could save money — and perhaps even your life. Nougat is starting to appear on phones, including new ones expected from Google next week.
  • How to change the home screen launcher on Android
  • Andromeda: Chrome OS and Android will merge
  • Sale of Kodi 'fully-loaded' streaming boxes faces legal test
  • Android boxes: Middlesbrough man to be first to be prosecuted for selling streaming kits

Endless OS 3.0 is out!

So our latest and greatest Endless OS is out with the new 3.0 version series! The shiny new things include the use of Flatpak to manage the applications; a new app center (GNOME Software); a new icon set; a new Windows installer that gives you the possibility of installing Endless OS in dual-boot; and many bug fixes. Read more

Expandable, outdoor IoT gateway runs Android on i.MX6

VIA’s “Artigo A830” IoT gateway runs Android on an i.MX6 DualLite SoC and offers HDMI, GbE, microSD, numerous serial and USB ports, plus -20 to 60° operation. As the name suggests, the VIA Technologies Artigo A830 Streetwise IoT Platform is designed for outdoor Internet of Things gateway applications. These are said to include smart lockers, vending machines, information kiosks, and signage devices that run “intensive multimedia shopping, entertainment, and navigation applications.” The outdoors focus is supported with an extended -20 to 60°C operating range, as well as surge and ESD protection for surviving challenges such as a nearby lightning strike. Read more