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Tuesday, 30 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Distributing Software Modules Using rsync

Filed under
Software

Distributing software packages to all of our servers is a tedious task. Currently, a release manager makes a connection to each server and transfers files using ftp. This involves entering passwords multiple times, waiting for transfers to complete, changing directories, and keeping files organized. We developed a shell script that makes the job easier.

Straddling the Open Source/Proprietary Fence

Filed under
OSS

Given the jaw-dropping occurrences in the open source world last year (Red Hat’s acquisition of JBoss, Oracle’s announcement of “Unbreakable Linux,” and Novell’s patent pact with Microsoft, to name a few), InfoWorld’s Neil McAllister says balancing open and proprietary, commercial and free, will be the critical task for enterprise IT managers this year and for a time to follow.

U of R offers open source course

Filed under
OSS

Open source software is typically available for free and is set up so that programmers around the world can tinker with the code and make improvements. Now, the University of Regina has joined the fray, launching its first senior-level course in open source software development.

The Road to KDE 4: SVG Rendering in Applications

Filed under
KDE

Since KDE 4 development is in full swing with plans for a KDE 4.0 release sometime later this year, I thought I'd put together a weekly piece entitled The Road to KDE 4. The idea is to have a short overview of one or two of the features that show progress in KDE 4. For my first issue, the goal is to show off some of the great SVG work that has taken place so far.

New Year, New Look for PC-BSD 1.3

Filed under
BSD

Linux isn't the only open source operating system vying for the desktop; BSD in the form of the PC-BSD effort is too. The new PC-BSD also sports a new look and a new base system using the KDE 3.5.5 desktop.

Audi's new luxury cars engineered on Linux

Filed under
Linux

For several years, German automobile manufacturer Audi AG, a subsidiary of the Volkswagen Group, has been steadily migrating its engineering systems over to Linux. The company hopes to finish the job in 2007 and have the bulk of its servers and workstations running 64-bit Linux by the end of the year.

Migrating MII Server to Apache on Red Hat Linux

Filed under
HowTos

For people migrating from Windows to Linux, the Apache Web server is entirely different world from Microsoft Internet Information Server. Apache can be alienating to IIS / Windows administrators, because migrating to Apache is more than just copying files.

Also: ZENworks vs. Red Hat Network: Cost vs. flexibility

Linux software installation to improve

Filed under
Linux

Installing a new application on Linux can be challenging, even for experts. Now, the LSB (Linux Standard Base) project and its parent organization, the FSG (Free Standards Group), have a plan for how to make it easier for both users and developers.

January Issue of PCLinuxOS Magazine Available

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PCLOS

The 5th Issue of PCLinuxOS Magazine is online and ready to consume. This month's topics include: Creating an Update CD or DVD, Linux Users Owe Microsoft, Guide to Installing Diablo II LOD, Desktop Changes, and Partition Tables Explained.

Book review: OpenOffice.org 2 Guide

Filed under
Reviews

OpenOffice.org expert Solveig Haugland has published a massive new manual called the OpenOffice.org 2 Guide. This 520-page tome will be useful both for OOo newbies and power users who are interested in learning arcane features of the office suite.

XGI Technology Drivers Revisited

Filed under
Software

It has been one year to the day since XGI Technology had last released a Volari Linux display driver and about 14 months since we had first delivered word of XGI considering open-source 3D display drivers. Where do things now stand for XGI Technology? We will tell you all of the details today where things are for this Taiwan graphics company.

Open source personal tracking system gets first test

Filed under
Misc

An open source wireless tracking system for following people around buildings got its first public use last week at the Chaos Communication Congress in Berlin.

Red Hat buoyant as shares soar

Filed under
Linux

Shares in Red Hat rose by 25 per cent after the company released details of its third-quarter results.

Tunneling MySQL connections through SSH

Filed under
Linux
HowTos

This is a description of how to set up a secure tunnel between your MySQL Server and a locally running MySQL Administrator using Putty. By creating a secure tunnel to your MySQL server using Putty, you can grant localhost access to powerful applications like MySQL Administrator while at the same time, make your server appear as if it is not even there. In effect, make your MySQL server disappear from the outside world.

infoRSS: An unobtrusive RSS feed manager for Thunderbird and Firefox

Filed under
Software

With so many RSS aggregators to choose from, you can pick the one that fits your specific needs. If you don't want to install anything on your machine and you need to be able to access your news feeds from anywhere, you can opt for a Web-based solution like Netvibes. If you prefer a dedicated desktop RSS reader chock-full of features, then something like RSSOwl or BlogBridge is the way to go. But if you don't want to get used to a whole new application, you might want to give infoRSS a try. Unlike other RSS aggregators, infoRSS is a Thunderbird/Firefox extension that runs inside your email client or browser.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Install Sun Looking glass Desktop environment in Ubuntu
  • Install Firefox 2.0 on Fedora Core 6

  • Combine multiple PDFs into one file in Ubuntu Linux
  • Cut & Paste Source Code to Console
  • Mount Remote Directories Securely with SSH
  • How To Create A Local Debian/Ubuntu Mirror With apt-mirror
  • Archiving With The zip And unzip Commands
  • Change language in Firefox and Swiftfox web browsers
  • How to Install Netgear wg111v2 wireless dongle card on Ubuntu Edgy

  • How to configure a scanner's buttons on Linux
  • Using sh -c with find
  • How to get Linux to prompt before removing a file in the CLI

  • Create A Desktop Background Wallpaper Changer For Xfce

Microsoft Vista not an option

Filed under
Microsoft

I HAVE REALISED that I can not move to Vista, ever, Microsoft is forcing me to Linux. I can't legitimately use its software without becoming a criminal or spending tens of thousands of dollars. It simply is not worth it.

A Non-Techie Discovers Free, Legal Software

Filed under
OSS

With all the sophisticated open source software out there, it's been easy to cut my ties to the world of paid software. I'm not quite a fully developed open source junkie though. Yet.

How to protect buggy programs from security vulnerabilities under Linux and UNIX

Filed under
HowTos

A Buffer overflows is a serious security problem. It allows an attacker to inject executable code of their choice into an already-running application. With such problems in mind, Berger created a new program that prevents crashing and makes users safer, he says. Dubbed DieHard, it protects applications from as-yet unfixed bugs and security vulnerabilities.

Running GNU/Linux Debian s390 under a i386

Filed under
HowTos

Using the hercules emulator it is possible to have your system emulate an IBM mainframe! Here we'll give a brief overview of using the emulator to install a pre-made image of Woody, giving you a Debian GNU/Linux S390 system.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • A Quick Hands-On With Chatty, A Desktop Twitch Chat Client
    Chatty is a desktop Twitch Chat client for Windows, macOS and Linux written in Ja
  • HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 Adds Support for Linux Mint 18, Fedora 24
    The open-source HP Linux Imaging and Printing (HPLIP) project has been updated on August 29, 2016, to version 3.16.8, a maintenance update that adds support for new printers and GNU/Linux operating systems. According to the release notes, HP Linux Imaging and Printing 3.16.8 adds support for new all-in-one HP printers, including HP OfficeJet Pro 6970, HP OfficeJet Pro 6960, HP OfficeJet 250 Mobile, HP DeskJet 3700, as well as HP DeskJet Ink Advantage 3700. Also new in the HPLIP 3.16.8 update is support for the recently released Linux Mint 18 "Sarah" Cinnamon, MATE, Xfce, and the upcoming KDE editions, the Fedora 24 Linux operating system, as well as the Debian GNU/Linux 8.5 "Jessie" distribution. So if you're using any of these OSes, you can now update to the latest HPLIP release.
  • MPlayer-Based MPV 0.20.0 Video Player Released with New Options and Commands
    The popular, open-source, and cross-platform MPV video player software received a new update, version 0.20.0, which comes only two weeks after the previous 0.19.0 maintenance release. MPV 0.20.0 is not a major update, and, according to the release notes, it only implements a couple of new options and commands, such as "--video-unscaled=downscale-big" for changing the aspect ratio. Additionally, the MPlayer-based video playback application also gets the "--image-display-duration" option for controlling the duration of image display, and a new "dcomposition" flag for controlling DirectComposition.
  • FFmpeg 3.1.3 "Laplace" Open-Source Multimedia Framework Now Available for Linux
    The major FFmpeg 3.1 "Laplace" open-source and cross-platform multimedia framework has received recently its third maintenance update, version 3.1.3, which brings updated components. FFmpeg 3.1 was announced two months ago, at the end of June, and it introduced a multitude of new features to make the popular multimedia backend even more reliable and handy to game and application developers. Dubbed Laplace, FFmpeg 3.1 is currently the most advanced FFmpeg release, cut from Git master on June 26, 2016.
  • GNU Scientific Library 2.2 released
    Version 2.2 of the GNU Scientific Library (GSL) is now available. GSL provides a large collection of routines for numerical computing in C. This release contains new linear algebra routines (Pivoted and Modified Cholesky, Complete Orthogonal Decomposition, matrix condition number estimation) as well as a completely rewritten nonlinear least squares module, including support for Levenberg-Marquardt, dogleg, double-dogleg, and Steihaug-Toint methods. The full NEWS file entry is appended below.

today's howtos

Leftovers: OSS

  • Report: If DOD Doesn't Embrace Open Source, It'll 'Be Left Behind'
    Unless the Defense Department and its military components levy increased importance on software development, they risk losing military technical superiority, according to a new report from the Center for a New American Security. In the report, the Washington, D.C.-based bipartisan think tank argues the Pentagon, which for years has relied heavily on proprietary software systems, “must actively embrace open source software” and buck the status quo. Currently, DOD uses open source software “infrequently and on an ad hoc basis,” unlike tech companies like Google, Amazon and Facebook that wouldn’t exist without open source software.
  • The Honey Trap of Copy/Pasting Open Source Code
    I couldn’t agree more with Bill Sourour’s article ‘Copy.Paste.Code?’ which says that copying and pasting code snippets from sources like Google and StackOverflow is fine as long as you understand how they work. However, the same logic can’t be applied to open source code. When I started open source coding at the tender age of fourteen, I was none the wiser to the pitfalls of copy/pasting open source code. I took it for granted that if a particular snippet performed my desired function, I could just insert it into my code, revelling in the fact that I'd just gotten one step closer to getting my software up and running. Yet, since then, through much trial and error, I’ve learned a thing or two about how to use open source code effectively.
  • Affordable, Open Source, 3D Printable CNC Machine is Now on Kickstarter
    The appeals of Kickstarter campaigns are many. There are the rewards for backers, frequently taking the form of either deep discounts on the final product or unusual items that can’t be found anywhere else. Pledging to support any crowdfunding campaign is a gamble, but it’s an exciting gamble; just browsing Kickstarter is pretty exciting, in fact, especially in the technological categories. Inventive individuals and startups offer new twists on machines like 3D printers and CNC machines – often for much less cost than others on the market.
  • Open Standards and Open Source
    Much has changed in the telecommunications industry in the years since Standards Development Organization (SDOs) such as 3GPP, ITU and OMA were formed. In the early days of telecom and the Internet, as fundamental technology was being invented, it was imperative for the growth of the new markets that standards were established prior to large-scale deployment of technology and related services. The process for development of these standards followed a traditional "waterfall" approach, which helped to harmonize (sometimes competing) pre-standard technical solutions to market needs.

Leftovers: BSD

  • The Voicemail Scammers Never Got Past Our OpenBSD Greylisting
    We usually don't see much of the scammy spam and malware. But that one time we went looking for them, we found a campaign where our OpenBSD greylisting setup was 100% effective in stopping the miscreants' messages. During August 23rd to August 24th 2016, a spam campaign was executed with what appears to have been a ransomware payload. I had not noticed anything particularly unusual about the bsdly.net and friends setup that morning, but then Xavier Mertens' post at isc.sans.edu Voice Message Notifications Deliver Ransomware caught my attention in the tweetstream, and I decided to have a look.
  • Why FreeBSD Doesn't Aim For OpenMP Support Out-Of-The-Box