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Monday, 23 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Ubuntu 8.10 has something for everyone

Filed under
Ubuntu

greenhughes.com: As you might know,a new version of Ubuntu was released a few days ago adding some new features and polish to this already fine operating system, and I've been trying out not only Ubuntu itself, but also some other members of the Ubuntu family.

Test your Linux IQ

Filed under
Linux

infoworld.com: You've installed every major Linux distribution on every major brand of hardware. You even carry a USB stick loaded with Linux in your front pocket. For you, the Year of the Linux Desktop was 1996. But how much do you really know about the free OS? Test your mettle with these 20 questions.

Examining Alternative Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

informit.com: Have you tried the major Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora/RHEL, and OpenSUSE/SLED? Were they not quite right for your needs? The major distros are not the only game in town. Find out the good, the bad, and the ugly about three of the best-known alternatives to the "big" user distros.

Ubuntu 9.04 Release Schedule

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: The Ubuntu 9.04 (codename Jaunty Jackalope) development will start in 4 days, on November 6th, and will conclude next year on April 23rd, with the final release.

Free Imaging software - CloneZilla & PartImage - Tutorial

Filed under
Software
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: This article introduces a pair of excellent, free imaging software solutions that you can use to backup your complete systems.

Gaming and Linux software RAID – Your path to pwnage

Filed under
Software

headshotgamer.com: Hard drives are often forgotten as there isn't a huge amount you can do, apart from buy a Western Digital VelociRaptor. There is one more option though, using two (or more) inexpensive drives and RAID them together to increase the speed dramatically. This way you can get to high speed nirvana without destroying your budget.

Slow startup? Bootchart reveals all

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Ever wondered what takes your Linux box so long to boot up? You can see for certain with the Bootchart package. Bootchart logs the entire startup process and produces a clean, graphical representation of its results suitable for everything from troubleshooting to good old-fashioned bragging rights.

The Linux learning curve is flatter than ever

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: One of the biggest so called barriers to adopting Linux is what is called the learning curve. Many people describe the learning curve for Linux to be a steep one. It used to be but not any more.

odds & ends & stuff

Filed under
News
  • Linux *is* granny-compatible, since long

  • Upgraded to Ubuntu 8.10, thumbs up
  • Three years of Ubuntu
  • German Foreign Ministry starts open source blitzkreig
  • Software Respositories in openSUSE explained
  • Linux 2.6.28-rc3
  • Open Source Software
  • A few quick tips for apt
  • The path of least resistance
  • Get Cable, Dish and Local TV Listings Using Bash

Top 40 Firefox plugins, extensions and add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF

tech.blorge.com: Firefox is a very useful and feature-rich browser, we all know that. But aside from being a robust Web browser, Firefox is appealing to more sophisticated users because of the support that it gets from third-party applications developers.

Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

celettu.wordpress: I honestly wasn’t sure if I’d write a review… Still, I figure that if you hate Ubuntu you won’t have read any of them, and if you don’t…you can’t have enough Ubuntu!

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #115

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #115 for the week of October 26th - September 1st, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Ubuntu 8.10 released, Ubuntu 8.10 Server: significant new features, and Over 6 million Forums posts and counting.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • using KVM on Mandriva 2009.0

  • Half Life & Condition Zero on openSUSE 11.0
  • NDISwrapper in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex
  • Find the correct number of entries in a directory
  • Detect if daemon is really running

Tips and tricks to tune up KDE 4.1

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

techradar.com: Have you been clinging to KDE 3.5 like a polar bear to the last Arctic ice shelf? If so, now's a good time to consider jumping on to the mainland. The recently released KDE 4.1 is a vast improvement over the original.

What can KOffice 2 Beta 2 offer us?

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: KDE4 isn’t the only application under development rush in the KDE world. KDevelop 4 and KOffice 2 are also being migrated to Qt4 and enriched with new features. This time I’m going to check what KOffice 2 Beta 2 can offer.

Do you really need to install Ubuntu 8.10?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ubuntu fans rejoice, the latest release is upon us in the form of version 8.10, Intrepid Ibex. But can't you just run a software update in Hardy Heron? I'll tell you what's different down to the package level between an upgraded Hardy installation and a fresh Intrepid installation so you can evaluate for yourself.

Ultamatix

Filed under
Software

mjg59.livejournal: First, let me make one thing clear. This isn't constructive criticism. This is just criticism. It's directed at software that's so wrong-headed that there's no way to make it significantly better, and everyone involved would be much better spending their time doing something else instead of trying to fix any of what I'm about to describe.

Linux Hater's Blog dead, long live the redux

Filed under
Linux
Web

itwire.com: On October 25, 2008, the Linux Hater's Blog reached the "eof", or end of file. But if you've been hassled endlessly by Linux lovers and are sick to death of Linux this and Linux that, fear not - the Linux Hater's Redux is born.

openSUSE 11.1: Plasma Desktop Toolbox

Filed under
KDE

kdedevelopers.org: Discussions about the usefulness of the Plasma desktop toolbox arise regularly. Usually it focus on the "Zoom Out"/Activities feature which as also Plasma developers admit is not as far implemented and nicely integrated as of KDE 4.1 as everyone wants it to be.

Features of Phoronix Test Suite 1.4

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Phoronix Test Suite 1.4 "Orkdal" will be released tomorrow, and while this release is coming just two months after the release of Phoronix Test Suite 1.2, there are in fact quite a few changes for this Q4'08 release.

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More in Tux Machines

GitLab Web IDE

  • GitLab Web IDE Goes GA and Open-Source in GitLab 10.7
    GitLab Web IDE, aimed to simplify the workflow of accepting merge requests, is generally available in GitLab 10.7, along with other features aimed to improve C++ and Go code security and improve Kubernets integration. The GitLab Web IDE was initially released as a beta in GitLab 10.4 Ultimate with the goal of streamlining the workflow to contribute small fixes and to resolve merge requests without requiring the developer to stash their changes and switch to a new branch locally, then back. This could be of particular interest to developers who have a significant number of PRs to review, as well as to developers starting their journey with Git.
  • GitLab open sources its Web IDE
    GitLab has announced its Web IDE is now generally available and open sourced as part of the GitLab 10.7 release. The Web IDE was first introduced in GitLab Ultimate 10.4. It is designed to enable developers to change multiple files, preview Markdown, review changes and commit directly within a browser. “At GitLab, we want everyone to be able to contribute, whether you are working on your first commit and getting familiar with git, or an experienced developer reviewing a stack of changes. Setting up a local development environment, or needing to stash changes and switch branches locally, can add friction to the development process,” Joshua Lambert, senior product manager of monitoring and distribution at GitLab, wrote in a post.

Record Terminal Activity For Ubuntu 16.04 LTS Server

At times system administrators and developers need to use many, complex and lengthy commands in order to perform a critical task. Most of the users will copy those commands and output generated by those respective commands in a text file for review or future reference. Of course, “history” feature of the shell will help you in getting the list of commands used in the past but it won’t help in getting the output generated for those commands. Read
more

Linux Kernel Maintainer Statistics

As part of preparing my last two talks at LCA on the kernel community, “Burning Down the Castle” and “Maintainers Don’t Scale”, I have looked into how the Kernel’s maintainer structure can be measured. One very interesting approach is looking at the pull request flows, for example done in the LWN article “How 4.4’s patches got to the mainline”. Note that in the linux kernel process, pull requests are only used to submit development from entire subsystems, not individual contributions. What I’m trying to work out here isn’t so much the overall patch flow, but focusing on how maintainers work, and how that’s different in different subsystems. Read more

Security: Updates, Trustjacking, Breach Detection

  • Security updates for Monday
  • iOS Trustjacking – A Dangerous New iOS Vulnerability
    An iPhone user's worst nightmare is to have someone gain persistent control over his/her device, including the ability to record and control all activity without even needing to be in the same room. In this blog post, we present a new vulnerability called “Trustjacking”, which allows an attacker to do exactly that. This vulnerability exploits an iOS feature called iTunes Wi-Fi sync, which allows a user to manage their iOS device without physically connecting it to their computer. A single tap by the iOS device owner when the two are connected to the same network allows an attacker to gain permanent control over the device. In addition, we will walk through past related vulnerabilities and show the changes that Apple has made in order to mitigate them, and why these are not enough to prevent similar attacks.
  • What Is ‘Trustjacking’? How This New iOS Vulnerability Allows Remote Hacking?
    This new vulnerability called trustjacking exploits a convenient WiFi feature, which allows iOS device owners to manage their devices and access data, even when they are not in the same location anymore.
  • Breach detection with Linux filesystem forensics
    Forensic analysis of a Linux disk image is often part of incident response to determine if a breach has occurred. Linux forensics is a different and fascinating world compared to Microsoft Windows forensics. In this article, I will analyze a disk image from a potentially compromised Linux system in order to determine the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the incident and create event and filesystem timelines. Finally, I will extract artifacts of interest from the disk image. In this tutorial, we will use some new tools and some old tools in creative, new ways to perform a forensic analysis of a disk image.