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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:30pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:29pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:28pm
Story The First Vivid-Based Ubuntu Touch Image Has Been Released Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:22pm
Story Security-Minded Qubes OS Will Satisfy Your Yen for Xen Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:02pm
Story Sad News! ;-) Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 9:44pm
Story Android creator Andy Rubin is leaving Google Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 9:11pm
Story NVIDIA's Linux Driver On Ubuntu 14.10 Can Deliver Better OpenGL Performance Than Windows 8.1 Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 9:00pm
Story Tizen IVI version 3.0 Milestone M3-Oct2014 has been released Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 8:55pm
Story Linux 3.16.y.z extended stable support Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 8:38pm

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 267

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Interviews: Kris Moore, PC-BSD lead developer

  • News: Fedora and Red Hat servers compromised - CentOS unaffected, Novell extends "interoperability" deal; openSUSE ads SELinux support, gNewSense celebrates second birthday, user-visible changes in NetBSD 5.0
  • Released last week: antiX MEPIS 7.5, gNewSense 2.1
  • Upcoming releases: Tentative release dates for FreeBSD 6.4, 7.1
  • Site news: Translation to Urdu, status reclassification
  • New additions: openmamba GNU/Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Swedish Television Rumored to Expose Microsoft’s Mojave Campaign

Filed under
Microsoft

inux-foundation.org/weblogs/jzemlin: While everyone is talking about the fact that Jerry Sienfled has signed up to pitch Microsoft Vista it is worth noting another ad campaign that Microsoft launched last week entitled the “Mojave Experiment.”

openSUSE 11 - Desktop Emphasis

Filed under
SUSE

superphysics.awardspace: I had said earlier that I was really going to put this one to the blade. Why? Because openSUSE 10.3 happens to be my favourite distro so far, and I was under the hope that this would be a good if not better. And I would test this with KDE 4, because that is the only real reason I would shift to 11.0 from 10.3.

Better bookmark tagging with HandyTag, Tagmarks, and TagSifter

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: The bookmark tagging feature introduced in Firefox 3 is not particularly difficult in use: when bookmarking a Web page, enter the tags you like into the Tags field of the bookmarking dialog window and you are pretty much done. Tagging provides a more flexible way of keeping track of bookmarks than traditional folders.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Ubuntu Eee 8.04.1 release - live - Day 2

  • Ubuntu 8.04 Hardy Heron - Second Chance, Wireless Works and was Easy
  • 3 Things in Linux you should NOT Install
  • Unix and Linux Online Language Translation Script
  • Open Source Software and Patents: An Uneasy Journey of Discovery and Understanding
  • Linux Outlaws 52 - Not Sponsored by Dell

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Reworking Shell Scripts

  • Easy File Sharing
  • HOWTO: Easy music sharing (or anything else you want)
  • Enable sendmail mailstats
  • Manage a Linux RAID 10 Storage Server
  • How To Install And Setup Jinzora Media Server In Ubuntu
  • 20 sureshot steps to install Ubuntu from USB
  • Using the Bcfg2 SSHbase plugin

First Impressions of Ubuntu 8.04

Filed under
Ubuntu

randombloggings.wordpress: When I purchased a laptop a little over a year ago I wanted nothing to do with Vista. As a result I was determined to create a dual-boot setup with Windows XP (so I could play some games) and Ubuntu (so I could actually have a working system).

Open source still looking to shake off concerns

Filed under
OSS

networkworld.com: Although open source software has gained a place in enterprise networks alongside proprietary software, it can't seem to shake doubts about security and intellectual-property issues that have long dogged the movement.

EasyTag: a graphical interface to managing your music files’ tags

Filed under
Software

debaday.debian.net: EasyTag is a graphical utility to edit the descriptive ID3 tags for your music files. One will think primarily of MP3 files, but it also does other formats, such as Ogg, FLAC, MP4/AAC, MusePack, Monkey’s Audio files and WavPack files (APE tag).

Mozilla turbocharges Firefox, touts major speed gains

Filed under
Moz/FF

computerworld.com: Mozilla Corp. said Friday it has added the fruits of a two-month JavaScript turbo power project to the latest preview of its next browser, Firefox 3.1, that boosts some benchmark speeds by nearly 40 times over Firefox 3.0.

Greens urge end to software patents

stuff.co.nz: The Green Party has called for an overhaul of patent laws that would prevent software being patented. The party's policy on information technology was released by MP Metiria Turei.

Why does Apple Always Seem to Get a Break???

Filed under
OS

linux-foundation.org/weblogs/jzemlin: Walking around Linuxworld this year it was interesting to see the number of Apple notebooks in the halls and various sessions. It wasn’t necessarily that there were more Apple notebooks than Linux machines, but it was a good number and begs the question: why do open source people seem to cut Apple some slack when it comes to their very closed proprietary platform?

Ubuntu: Can Your Business Trust A Free System

Filed under
Ubuntu

bloggista.com: Got to be honest, the first time I heard about Ubuntu was sometime April of this year over at Archon-Digital’s blog when he made an article of his switch to Ubuntu. Even after reading his post, I still didn’t get the idea of what exactly Ubuntu is all about.

New Linux-powered Kindle on its way

Filed under
Hardware

practical-tech.com: The Kindle, Amazon’s Linux-powered electronic paper book will have at least one new version out for the 2008 holiday season. The second generation Kindle is expected to have both an improved user-interface and a larger screen.

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #105

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #105 for the week of August 17th - August 23rd, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Major update of Ubuntu Brainstorm: Call for testing, Ubuntu New Jersey 2008 BBQ/LAN party, and Happy Birthday Linux.

Ubuntu 8.10 - My Thoughts So Far

Filed under
Ubuntu

joeb454.co.uk: I know it’s only Alpha 4, but I decided to install it on my laptop last night because I can, and I had nothing else to do. So far so good, it’s got to be said! There’s a few issues I’ve noticed though, these are:

Debating the Firefox SSL Certificate

Filed under
Moz/FF

pcworld.com: Debate is reaching a fever pitch over a new security feature in Firefox 3.0 that throws out a warning page to users when a Web site's SSL certificate is expired or has not been issued by a trusted third party.

Open source moves into the mainstream

Filed under
OSS

nzherald.co.nz: If your business hasn't yet dipped its toe into the open-source software waters, it's as behind the times as a company five years ago that was not yet on the internet.

Another OLPC man goes his own way

Filed under
OLPC

itwire.com: Another stalwart of the One Laptop per Child Project has gone his own way - after telling project founder Nicholas Negroponte that he (Negroponte) had failed to go beyond the stage of a prototype.

openSUSE Election Committee Founded

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: We now have founded an openSUSE Election Committee. The openSUSE election committee will organize and oversee the first openSUSE Board election, the board has authorized it to decide any open questions on the elections.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Today in Techrights

Security Leftovers

  • One-stop counterfeit certificate shops for all your malware-signing needs

    The Stuxnet worm that targeted Iran's nuclear program almost a decade ago was a watershed piece of malware for a variety of reasons. Chief among them, its use of cryptographic certificates belonging to legitimate companies to falsely vouch for the trustworthiness of the malware. Last year, we learned that fraudulently signed malware was more widespread than previously believed. On Thursday, researchers unveiled one possible reason: underground services that since 2011 have sold counterfeit signing credentials that are unique to each buyer.

  • How did OurMine hackers use DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks? [Ed: False. They did not attack Wikileaks; they attacked the DNS servers/framework. The corporate media misreported this at the time.
    The OurMine hacking group recently used DNS poisoning to attack WikiLeaks and take over its web address. Learn how this attack was performed from expert Nick Lewis.
  • Intel didn't give government advance notice on chip flaws

    Google researchers informed Intel of flaws in its chips in June. The company explained in its own letter to lawmakers that it left up to Intel informing the government of the flaws.

    Intel said that it did not notify the government at the time because it had “no indication of any exploitation by malicious actors,” and wanted to keep knowledge of the breach limited while it and other companies worked to patch the issue.

    The company let some Chinese technology companies know about the vulnerabilities, which government officials fear may mean the information was passed along to the Chinese government, according to The Wall Street Journal.

  • Intel hid CPU bugs info from govt 'until public disclosure'

    As iTWire reported recently, Intel faces a total of 33 lawsuits over the two flaws. Additionally, the Boston law firm of Block & Leviton is preparing a class action lawsuit against Intel chief executive Brian Krzanich for allegedly selling a vast majority of his Intel stock after the company was notified of the two security flaws and before they became public.

  • Intel did not tell U.S. cyber officials about chip flaws until made public [iophk: "yeah right"]

    Current and former U.S. government officials have raised concerns that the government was not informed of the flaws before they became public because the flaws potentially held national security implications. Intel said it did not think the flaws needed to be shared with U.S. authorities as hackers [sic] had not exploited the vulnerabilities.

  • LA Times serving cryptocurrency mining script [iophk: "JS"]

    The S3 bucket used by the LA Times is apparently world-writable and an ethical hacker [sic] appears to have left a warning in the repository, warning of possible misuse and asking the owner to secure the bucket.

  • Facebook's Mandatory Malware Scan Is an Intrusive Mess

    When an Oregon science fiction writer named Charity tried to log onto Facebook on February 11, she found herself completely locked out of her account. A message appeared saying she needed to download Facebook’s malware scanner if she wanted to get back in. Charity couldn’t use Facebook until she completed the scan, but the file the company provided was for a Windows device—Charity uses a Mac.

  • Tinder plugs flaw that enabled account takeover using just a phone number

    As Tinder uses Facebook profile pics for its users to lure in a mate or several, the 'dating' app is somewhat tied to the social network. When a swipe-hungry Tinder user comes to login to their account they can either do so via Facebook or use their mobile number.

  • `

Android Leftovers