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Thursday, 18 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Tizen Samsung Gear S will be arriving in the US this fall Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 9:19am
Story After XP, is an open source operating system for you? Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 9:16am
Story Puppet-wearing devs: There's now an app (or two) for that Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 9:15am
Story Dan Allen and Sarah White: Documentation Dearth Dooms Open Source Projects Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 9:01am
Story Practical Tiny Core in the Fire Service Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 8:58am
Story Intel Publishes Open-Source "Skylake" Mesa Graphics Driver Support Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 8:53am
Story What's new in OpenStack Juno Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 8:50am
Story Elive 2.3.6 beta released Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 8:46am
Story Tiny i.MX6 module takes Linux into harsh environments Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 8:40am
Story Is Oracle Using Canonical to Counter Red Hat? Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 8:39am

Windows Now Open Source

Filed under
Linux

linuxtreat.blogspot: The news is here, today 'LinuxTreat' in association with other open-source developer had released some flavor of Windows for free. If you are shocked, here are some screen shots of this 'Open Windows Flavor' with their description.

More Productive “Open With” method

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntuproductivity.com: In switching from the Mac OS Leopard to Ubuntu Linux there was one Mac feature I seriously missed—the ability to drag-and-drop a file onto any application icon to open it. On Linux (at least the setup I am running—Ubuntu 8.04 Linux with the Gnome 2.22 desktop) this does not seem to be possible.

OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta goes live

Filed under
OOo

tectonic.co.za: The OpenOffice.org development team has released the second beta of the forthcoming OpenOffice.org 3.0 office suite. The latest beta includes a number of new features that will make the wait for 3.0 worth it.

Linux can save us

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: In case you haven't noticed, the economy is collapsing. You can't afford to drive anywhere. to drive there for much longer. Some of you may be losing your houses. Your job may also be at stake. How long do you think people will be paying Microsoft for its imperfect operating systems and office suites?

Firefox 3.1 alpha 1 code freeze is next Monday

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: Firefox 3 has only recently shipped but the first public milestone for its successor is fast approaching. The Mozilla team is expecting that the code freeeze for alpha 1 of Firefox 3.1, code named Shiretoko, will be next Monday and that alpha 1 be available for early adopter testing on July 25.

Also: Mozilla Developer News July 15

Kernel Release Numbering Redux

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: For many years, each Linux kernel release was assigned a series of three numbers, X.Y.Z, with an even Y indicating a "stable" release, and an odd Y indicating an "unstable" development release. Z was incremented for each individual kernel release. The "stable" 1.0.0 Linux kernel was released in March of 1994. New development was then continued in the "unstable" 1.1.z branch, until the "stable" 1.2.0 Linux kernel was release in March of 1995.

Kernel space: Multiqueue networking

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: One of the useful features in new networking hardware is extra transmit queues, to give a latency advantage to outgoing audio and video packets. A new kernel feature lets device driver writers use multiple queues per device.

What went wrong with the KDE 4 release?

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: When KDE 4.0 was released in January, it was supposed to be the foundation for a new era of desktop development. But as 4.x versions began finding their way into distributions, negative reactions began to obscure other ones. With the upcoming 4.1 release due at the end of this month, it's hard to avoid wondering: what happened?

Linux 2.6.26 brings embedded improvements

linuxdevices.com: A new stable kernel is out. Three months in the making, Linux 2.6.26 boasts read-only bind mounts, "big-iron" KVM ports, USB webcam support, 802.11s mesh WiFi, built-in support for remote kernel debugging, and a host of embedded architecture improvements, among other enhancements.

Unboxing openSUSE 11.0

Filed under
SUSE
Humor

zdnet.co.uk/blog: Yes! We got our hands on the hottest, most talked-about technological must-have... it is, of course, the boxed version of openSUSE 11.0! Prepare yourselves for an exclusive unboxfest:

KDE 4.1 RC1 Release Announcement

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE Community today released the Release Candidate for KDE 4.1. This release will is the last milestone towards KDE 4.1 due for final release on July 29th 2008, six months after the release of KDE 4.0.

Persistent Configuration Options For X.Org Drivers

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: In recent times, the xorg.conf (or formerly, XFree86.conf) file once used for configuring all static X-related server options has been shrinking in size. Thanks to more reliable EDID (Extended Display Identification Data) on LCD panels, it's generally no longer needed to manually specify mode-lines within this X.Org configuration file.

Apple sues clone maker Psystar

Filed under
Mac
Legal

cnet.com: Apple has sued Psystar, the company that for months has been selling the Open Computer, a Mac clone. Of course, if anything, the surprising thing is not that Apple is suing Psystar, but what took them this long?

Myah OS: Not quite ready

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Myah OS is a desktop-oriented distribution built from the ground up around a custom package manager. When things go right, it has the potential to be an easy to use, simplistic deskop operating system. As you will see, however, not everything always goes right.

Automate backups on Linux

Filed under
News

The loss of critical data can prove devastating. If you use Linux, you already have access to extremely powerful tools for creating custom backup solutions. The solutions in this article can help you perform simple to more advanced and secure network backups using open source tools that are part of nearly every Linux distribution.

Evidence mounts for August Eee PC carnage with $299 Dell E launch

Filed under
Hardware

digitimes.com & engadget.com: Dell is planning to introduce a low-cost notebook in August to join the low-cost notebook market, according to the market sources. The notebook will be manufactured by Compal Electronics, according to the sources.

An Early Look At OpenSolaris 2008.11

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: Over the weekend we had posted our synopsis of Solaris Express Community Edition Build 93, which brings a great deal of needed changes to the Solaris Nevada code-base in order to bring its packages up-to-date. While OpenSolaris 2008.05 is only two months old, work at Sun is already underway in preparing for the second OpenSolaris release, which will be known as OpenSolaris 2008.11.

A Reader’s Guide to the Red Hat/Firestar Settlement

Filed under
Linux
Legal

redhat.com: Last month, we announced that Red Hat had settled a patent infringement case with an agreement that was significant in fashioning a new model for protection for the open source community. We demonstrated that it is possible to satisfy the letter and spirit of GPL licensing in resolving patent litigation.

Linux guru? then switch to Arch Linux!

Filed under
Linux

antonywilliams.com: It's official, I've ditched Debian (and Ubuntu) completely. All my computers are now running Arch Linux. Why did I switch? It's more stable, faster, updated more frequently and more customisable. Let me explain some of the main differences.

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