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Friday, 19 Jan 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story AMD Releases OpenCL 2.0 Catalyst Linux Driver Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 5:32pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 4:35pm
Story 7 local governments announced to build with Code for America Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 4:11pm
Story Linux Foundation Certified Engineer Will Sheldon on What It's Like to Pass the Exam Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 4:04pm
Story openSUSE 13.2 Beta 1 vs. Fedora Linux Benchmarks Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 3:56pm
Story The story of Aaron Swartz and his fight for open Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 3:54pm
Story There's Wayland Changes Needed Before GNOME Will Be 100% Ported Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 3:51pm
Story elementary OS Freya beta review Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 2:53pm
Story The hair loss cure for new Linux users Roy Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 9:36am
Story Tizen Samsung Gear S will be arriving in the US this fall Rianne Schestowitz 25/09/2014 - 9:19am

More Productive “Open With” method

Filed under
Ubuntu

ubuntuproductivity.com: In switching from the Mac OS Leopard to Ubuntu Linux there was one Mac feature I seriously missed—the ability to drag-and-drop a file onto any application icon to open it. On Linux (at least the setup I am running—Ubuntu 8.04 Linux with the Gnome 2.22 desktop) this does not seem to be possible.

OpenOffice.org 3.0 beta goes live

Filed under
OOo

tectonic.co.za: The OpenOffice.org development team has released the second beta of the forthcoming OpenOffice.org 3.0 office suite. The latest beta includes a number of new features that will make the wait for 3.0 worth it.

Linux can save us

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: In case you haven't noticed, the economy is collapsing. You can't afford to drive anywhere. to drive there for much longer. Some of you may be losing your houses. Your job may also be at stake. How long do you think people will be paying Microsoft for its imperfect operating systems and office suites?

Firefox 3.1 alpha 1 code freeze is next Monday

Filed under
Moz/FF

blogs.zdnet.com: Firefox 3 has only recently shipped but the first public milestone for its successor is fast approaching. The Mozilla team is expecting that the code freeeze for alpha 1 of Firefox 3.1, code named Shiretoko, will be next Monday and that alpha 1 be available for early adopter testing on July 25.

Also: Mozilla Developer News July 15

Kernel Release Numbering Redux

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap.org: For many years, each Linux kernel release was assigned a series of three numbers, X.Y.Z, with an even Y indicating a "stable" release, and an odd Y indicating an "unstable" development release. Z was incremented for each individual kernel release. The "stable" 1.0.0 Linux kernel was released in March of 1994. New development was then continued in the "unstable" 1.1.z branch, until the "stable" 1.2.0 Linux kernel was release in March of 1995.

Kernel space: Multiqueue networking

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld.com: One of the useful features in new networking hardware is extra transmit queues, to give a latency advantage to outgoing audio and video packets. A new kernel feature lets device driver writers use multiple queues per device.

What went wrong with the KDE 4 release?

Filed under
KDE

linux.com: When KDE 4.0 was released in January, it was supposed to be the foundation for a new era of desktop development. But as 4.x versions began finding their way into distributions, negative reactions began to obscure other ones. With the upcoming 4.1 release due at the end of this month, it's hard to avoid wondering: what happened?

Linux 2.6.26 brings embedded improvements

linuxdevices.com: A new stable kernel is out. Three months in the making, Linux 2.6.26 boasts read-only bind mounts, "big-iron" KVM ports, USB webcam support, 802.11s mesh WiFi, built-in support for remote kernel debugging, and a host of embedded architecture improvements, among other enhancements.

Unboxing openSUSE 11.0

Filed under
SUSE
Humor

zdnet.co.uk/blog: Yes! We got our hands on the hottest, most talked-about technological must-have... it is, of course, the boxed version of openSUSE 11.0! Prepare yourselves for an exclusive unboxfest:

KDE 4.1 RC1 Release Announcement

Filed under
KDE

kde.org: The KDE Community today released the Release Candidate for KDE 4.1. This release will is the last milestone towards KDE 4.1 due for final release on July 29th 2008, six months after the release of KDE 4.0.

Persistent Configuration Options For X.Org Drivers

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: In recent times, the xorg.conf (or formerly, XFree86.conf) file once used for configuring all static X-related server options has been shrinking in size. Thanks to more reliable EDID (Extended Display Identification Data) on LCD panels, it's generally no longer needed to manually specify mode-lines within this X.Org configuration file.

Apple sues clone maker Psystar

Filed under
Mac
Legal

cnet.com: Apple has sued Psystar, the company that for months has been selling the Open Computer, a Mac clone. Of course, if anything, the surprising thing is not that Apple is suing Psystar, but what took them this long?

Myah OS: Not quite ready

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Myah OS is a desktop-oriented distribution built from the ground up around a custom package manager. When things go right, it has the potential to be an easy to use, simplistic deskop operating system. As you will see, however, not everything always goes right.

Automate backups on Linux

Filed under
News

The loss of critical data can prove devastating. If you use Linux, you already have access to extremely powerful tools for creating custom backup solutions. The solutions in this article can help you perform simple to more advanced and secure network backups using open source tools that are part of nearly every Linux distribution.

Evidence mounts for August Eee PC carnage with $299 Dell E launch

Filed under
Hardware

digitimes.com & engadget.com: Dell is planning to introduce a low-cost notebook in August to join the low-cost notebook market, according to the market sources. The notebook will be manufactured by Compal Electronics, according to the sources.

An Early Look At OpenSolaris 2008.11

Filed under
OS

phoronix.com: Over the weekend we had posted our synopsis of Solaris Express Community Edition Build 93, which brings a great deal of needed changes to the Solaris Nevada code-base in order to bring its packages up-to-date. While OpenSolaris 2008.05 is only two months old, work at Sun is already underway in preparing for the second OpenSolaris release, which will be known as OpenSolaris 2008.11.

A Reader’s Guide to the Red Hat/Firestar Settlement

Filed under
Linux
Legal

redhat.com: Last month, we announced that Red Hat had settled a patent infringement case with an agreement that was significant in fashioning a new model for protection for the open source community. We demonstrated that it is possible to satisfy the letter and spirit of GPL licensing in resolving patent litigation.

Linux guru? then switch to Arch Linux!

Filed under
Linux

antonywilliams.com: It's official, I've ditched Debian (and Ubuntu) completely. All my computers are now running Arch Linux. Why did I switch? It's more stable, faster, updated more frequently and more customisable. Let me explain some of the main differences.

Too many Linux distributions?

Filed under
Linux

celettu.wordpress: That’s one you often hear, right? There are too many Linux distributions, and that’s a problem. To some people, who then feel compelled to blog about it. Most of the times, the reasons stated are confusion for new Linux users, and lack of a unified install method for all Linuxes.

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More in Tux Machines

Meltdown and Spectre Linux Kernel Status - Update

I keep getting a lot of private emails about my previous post previous post about the latest status of the Linux kernel patches to resolve both the Meltdown and Spectre issues. These questions all seem to break down into two different categories, “What is the state of the Spectre kernel patches?”, and “Is my machine vunlerable?” Read more

today's leftovers

OSS: Jio, VMware Openwashing, and Testing Jobs

  • Jio is committed to use open source technology: Akash Ambani
    Speaking at the India Digital Open Summit 2018, Akash Ambani, Director of Reliance Jio Infocomm, said that open source is very important for his company. “The year 2017 was the tipping point for AR and VR globally. In India, AR and VR are in the initial stages of adoption but at Jio, we believe it will grow at a 50 percent compounded rate for the next five years,” Akash said. He also spoke on the evolution of artificial intelligence and blockchain.
  • VMware and Pivotal’s PKS Distribution Marries Kubernetes with BOSH [Ed: It looks like the author has been reduced to Microsoft propaganda and other openwashing puff pieces sponsored by proprietary software giants. We have given up on several writers who used to support GNU/Linux. Seeing their activity, it seems as though they ended up with neither gigs nor credibility (used to get far more writing assignments from LF, often for Microsoft openwashing).]
  • Hehe, still writing code for a living? It's 2018. You could be earning x3 as a bug bounty hunter
    Ethical hacking to find security flaws appears to pay better, albeit less regularly, than general software engineering. And while payment remains one of the top rationales for breaking code, hackers have begun citing more civic-minded reasons for their activities. A survey of 1,700 bug bounty hunters from more than 195 countries and territories by security biz HackerOne, augmented by the company's data on 900 bug bounty programs, has found that white-hat hackers earn a median salary that's 2.7 times that of typical software engineers in their home countries. In some places, the gap is far more pronounced. In India, for example, hackers make as much as 16 times the median programmer salary. In the US, they earn 2.4 times the median.

Security: Spectre and Meltdown, Industrial System Sabotage, VDP, Windows in Healthcare

  • Some thoughts on Spectre and Meltdown
     

    Contrast that with what happened this time around. Google discovered a problem and reported it to Intel, AMD, and ARM on June 1st. Did they then go around contacting all of the operating systems which would need to work on fixes for this? Not even close. FreeBSD was notified the week before Christmas, over six months after the vulnerabilities were discovered. Now, FreeBSD can occasionally respond very quickly to security vulnerabilities, even when they arise at inconvenient times — on November 30th 2009 a vulnerability was reported at 22:12 UTC, and on December 1st I provided a patch at 01:20 UTC, barely over 3 hours later — but that was an extremely simple bug which needed only a few lines of code to fix; the Spectre and Meltdown issues are orders of magnitude more complex.  

  • Menacing Malware Shows the Dangers of Industrial System Sabotage
     

    At the S4 security conference on Thursday, researchers from the industrial control company Schneider Electric, whose equipment Triton targeted, presented deep analysis of the malware—only the third recorded cyberattack against industrial equipment. Hackers [sic] were initially able to introduce malware into the plant because of flaws in its security procedures that allowed access to some of its stations, as well as its safety control network.

  • 25 per cent of hackers don't report bugs due to lack of disclosure policies
     

    One of the standout discoveries was that almost 25 per cent of respondents said they were unable to disclose a security flaw because the bug-ridden company in question lacked a vulnerability disclosure policy (VDP).

  • 'Professional' hack [sic] on Norwegian health authority compromises data of three million patients [iophk: "Windows TCO"]