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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story 20 Best KDE Applications srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 6:10pm
Story The Six Biggest Websites On The Internet Compared srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 6:08pm
Story The two faces of UK open source srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 6:06pm
Story Why Does the Linux Desktop So Lack Proprietary Apps? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 5:11pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 409 srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 3:03pm
Story Linux: Not for Lovers? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 3:00pm
Story Ubuntu breaks from the Linux pack srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 2:58pm
Story Do we still need the FSF, GNU and GPL? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 2:56pm
Story MegaGlest Amazing Strategy Game Chris7mas 13/06/2011 - 5:42am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 4:39am

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Running Internet Explorer in Ubuntu Linux

  • Tweaking grub settings : Ubuntu
  • Invalidating the Linux buffer cache
  • Recursively lists package dependencies Using apt-rdepends
  • SQL: Tips
  • Working with Your UNIX Shell

Kerberos authentication for AIX Version 5.3

Filed under
Linux

Find out how to use application programming interfaces (APIs) when writing your own custom Kerberos-based authentication applications. In this article, you'll examine different Kerberos credential cache name formats that AIX NFS V4 supports and are required for authentication purposes. You'll also look at different methods of obtaining the Kerberos credential.

Ubuntu: 32-bit v. 64-bit Performance

Filed under
Ubuntu

While 64-bit support is now considered common for both Intel and AMD processors, many Linux (as well as Windows) users are uncertain whether to use a 32-bit or 64-bit operating system with there being advantages for both paths. In this article, we will be comparing the i386 and x86_64 performance with Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy Eft and Ubuntu 7.04 Feisty Fawn Herd 1 to see how the numbers truly stack up.

Seven Things to do with a Free Vista laptop...

Filed under
Humor

Seems many bloggers woke up this morning to find Microsoft has left a laptop in their stocking. There is a minor hullabaloo rippling through Blogistan about it. Amongst others, Joel Spolsky of "Joel on Software" got one. This time, I'm not even linking to the original story; if you haven't heard about it by now, you don't care anyway.

Gmail problem limited, Google says

Filed under
Google

A problem with Google Inc.'s free e-mail service that has users increasingly reporting that their data and accounts are being irretrievably deleted is an isolated one, the internet search giant says.

2006: The year the FSF reached out to the community

Filed under
OSS

At the start of 2006, the Free Software Foundation (FSF) was largely inward-looking, focused on the GNU Project and high-level strategic concerns such as licensing. Now, without abandoning these issues, the FSF had transformed into an openly activist organization, reaching out to its supporters and encouraging their participation in civic campaigns often designed to enlist non-hackers in their causes. Yet what happened seems to bemuse even FSF employees.

Suse 10.2, part 4: KDE's Konqueror

Filed under
SUSE

I've grown to really like KDE. Working with KDE is, in a word, fun. Yes, fun. Enjoyable. A pleasure to work with. Easy to approach. Provides pleasant surprises and wonderful answers to problems I never new I really had. That's why I keep posting about Suse and KDE, especially this release.

Linux is the Future

Filed under
Interviews

Mark Shuttleworth gave an interview to Ukrainian online journal ‘Computer Review’ (Kompyuternoye Obozreniye), where he shared his thoughts about his life, Ubuntu, Space, Open source, Linux, Microsfot-Novell deal and other interesting things.

CIO study finds Linux ready for prime-time

Filed under
Linux

Nearly half of all enterprises will be running mission-critical business applications on Linux in five years' time. That's according to survey of IT directors, VPs and CIOs carried out by Saugatuck Research, which questioned 133 businesses worldwide.

Firefox man loses faith in Google

Filed under
Google
Moz/FF

BLAKE ROSS, one of the key people behind the Firefox browser, says that he is losing faith in the antics of the search engine Google.

Right-Click to Launch Custom Scripts with Nautilus

Filed under
HowTos

You might remember my previous post about how to actually use the Create Document option on your desktops right-click menu. Today I’ll go over how to create custom scripts to launch from that same panel. This can go for any frequently used program, custom scripts that you’ve written, etc. This tutorial is rated E for everyone!

Linux Tackles Old Foes With New Tools

Filed under
Linux

Linux users have much to look forward to in 2007, beginning with the end of the SCO saga, which has raged on since 2003. The year will also mark the birth of a new GPL and a new flagship enterprise Linux distribution from the current enterprise Linux leader, Red Hat.

Free software New Year's resolutions

Filed under
OSS

As the New Year swiftly approaches, it’s time to write those resolutions. From exercising more, eating fewer snacks, or remembering to call your mother on her birthday, we all think of various ways we can improve our lives, by starting good habits or ending bad ones. I’d like to suggest some resolutions that will assist you in your pursuit of free software.

“Commercial” is not the opposite of Free-Libre / Open Source Software

Filed under
OSS

When I talk with with other people about Free-Libre / Open Source Software (FLOSS), I still hear a lot of people mistakenly use the term “commercial software” as if it had the opposite meaning of FLOSS (aka open source software, Free-Libre Software, or OSS/FS).

Novell: We're a 'mixed-source' company

Filed under
SUSE

Novell's controversial pact with Microsoft reflects the desire of the number two Linux seller to position itself as a mixed-source company. Speaking to ZDNet Asia last week, Maarten Koster, the newly-appointed president of Novell Asia-Pacific, noted that the company positions itself in the market differently from its rivals.

Linux: Chasing Down Data Corruption

Filed under
Linux

In a couple of fascinating threads on the lkml, Linus Torvalds has been working with several other kernel developers to try and track down a difficult data corruption bug. Linus posted a test-program that's capable of consistently triggering the data corruption, so it's a matter of time before the bug is found and fixed.

Book Review - GIMP 2 For Photographers

Filed under
Reviews

If you are doing digital photography, and these days, who isn’t, then chances are you will be in need of an image editing program. If you have the money, you can spend around $600 for a copy of Photoshop or, for less functionality, you can get Photoshop Elements for about $100. But what if you are just starting out, or on a tight budget, or you work in a Linux environment?

Startup is counting on open source to launch its MMOG

Filed under
OSS

Brazil-based Hoplon Infotainment is a startup game developer and an open source shop. Its upcoming first product, Taikodom, is a "massively multiplayer online game (MMOG)" that includes elements of science fiction and magic. Hundreds of thousands of online users can play an MMOG at the same time, but that requires a lot of server power. Hoplon called on open source tools for its software development needs, and IBM to help it provide the bandwidth and CPU strength it requires.

SuperTux 0.3 is cool

Filed under
Gaming

I feel it is my happy duty to make all of you code less, by mentioning that the SuperTux people created a new release: 0.3.0. They apparently changed most of their rendering engine and physics code, and lots of other stuff changed with it. It looks much better than the already incredible 0.1.3 version that I played a lot.

Is Linux Ready for the SMB Space?

Filed under
Linux

Many small businesses have avoided Linux for a variety of reasons: not enough applications, complexity of installation or that it requires too much technical know-how to run. The technology has matured over many years, which raises the question: How valid are these considerations today?

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More in Tux Machines

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers

FOSS and Linux Events

  • On speaking at community conferences
    Many people reading this have already suffered me talking to them about Prometheus. In personal conversation, or in the talks I gave at DebConf15 in Heidelberg, the Debian SunCamp in Lloret de Mar, BRMlab in Prague, and even at a talk on a different topic at the RABS in Cluj-Napoca.
  • TPM Microconference Accepted into LPC 2016
    Although trusted platform modules (TPMs) have been the subject of some controversy over the years, it is quite likely that they have important roles to play in preventing firmware-based attacks, protecting user keys, and so on. However, some work is required to enable TPMs to successfully play these roles, including getting TPM support into bootloaders, securely distributing known-good hashes, and providing robust and repeatable handling of upgrades. In short, given the ever-more-hostile environments that our systems must operate in, it seems quite likely that much help will be needed, including from TPMs. For more details, see the TPM Microconference wiki page.
  • More translations added to the SFD countdown
    Software Freedom Day is celebrated all around the world and as usual our community helps us to provide marketing materials in their specific languages. While the wiki is rather simple to translate, the Countdown remains a bit more complicated and time consuming to localize. One needs to edit the SVG file and generate roughly a 100 pictures, then upload them to the wiki. Still this doesn’t scare the SFD teams around the world and we are happy to announce three more languages are ready to be used: French, Chinese and German!

Second FreeBSD 11.0 Release Candidate Restores Support for 'nat global' in IPFW

Glen Barber from the FreeBSD project announced the availability of the second RC (Release Candidate) development build of the upcoming FreeBSD 11.0 operating system. Read more