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Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Why Linux will not displace Windows

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I firmly believe that, all else being equal, the differences between the Windows desktop, the Macintosh desktop, and the Linux desktop are negligible. With the proper applications, all three platforms will be capable of providing a satisfactory experience for any user. All three platforms have both free and commercial products available for personal productivity, web browsing, and basic multimedia.

HP Touts its Prowess in Linux and Open Source

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While everyone knows that Linux is now pervasive in IT organizations, the slippery nature of open source software makes it difficult to gauge how deeply it has penetrated into the data centers of the world. And it is even harder to reckon how much money those Linux investments represent, since in many cases the costs associated with Linux are soft ones--paying system administrators to patch machines--rather than hard ones--buying a license and support contract from a third-party vendor. And if Linux is hard to quantify, other open source software presents even more of a challenge.

Command line tips - controlling your processes

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When you’re running a command that’s going to take a long time in your bash shell, but then you suddenly decide you don’t want to run it any more, CLI newbies can often be stuck as to how they should terminate a running command (aside from closing the terminal window). There are also other occasions when you want to control the process that’s running inside your terminal.

This post is going to give you a quick run-down of some of the most common key combinations that perform useful actions like terminating processes and setting them to run in the foreground and background.

Mozilla wrestles with Firefox 3.0 security moves

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Mozilla Corp. is still wrestling with adding a security feature to Firefox that its browser rival, Microsoft Corp.'s Internet Explorer 7, uses on Windows Vista to keep malware from hijacking computers.

In Vista, IE7 uses a technique Microsoft calls Protected Mode -- another name for "low rights" -- that blocks disk access to all but a temporary-files folder. The idea is that if an exploit -- a drive-by download, for instance -- attacks IE7 through a browser vulnerability, it can't install code on the PC's drive.

Technical Analysis: Linux VPN & How-To

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In our continuing series of papers describing both the research undertaken by the Open Source Software Lab, and technical tips, here is the latest networking configuration technical analysis.

This document provides the reader with an analysis of VPN functionality within the Linux operating system. Specifically, it provides a breakdown of VPN components and a description of what is available to Linux Administrators, in terms of manageability and functionality. It also provides a set of HOW-TO’s in the area’s of VPN and IPsec.

Microsoft guns Open XML onto ISO fast track

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The International Standards Organization (ISO) agreed Saturday to put Open XML, the document format created and championed by Microsoft Corp., on a fast-track approval process that could see Open XML ratified as an international standard by August.

That’s despite lingering opposition to Open XML by several key voting countries, including some of whom whose governments are moving forward to adopt the alternative Open Document Format for Office Applications (ODF) format, which the ISO approved as a standard last year.

Ubuntu is a dream compared to Windoze….

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Ubuntu is based on Debian and perhaps the hottest distro today. The main difference between Windows and Ubuntu (and most other Linux distros) is that Ubuntu just simply works, out of the box. (As you can already guess, I am somewhat baised on the issue Windows vs Linux…)

I just installed Ubuntu 6.06 (also known as Dapper Drake). The installation, as always was fast and easy. XP installs usually takes about an hour but Ubuntu took a halfhour top.

Join the Google Summer of Code with Ubuntu

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Ubuntu is once again participating in the Google Summer of Code and is hoping to make as many projects as possible available for students to work on.

Ubuntu is looking for exciting project ideas, preferably with detailed specs. Ideas can be related to Ubuntu, Edubuntu, Kubuntu and accessibility.

"It is a great opportunity to expose new students to the wonderful world of Ubuntu, get some exciting projects off the ground and get good exposure for the projects, students and organisations alike," said Matthias Klose on a posting on the Ubuntu developers' mailing list.

Primary school goes Ubuntu

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Recently we managed to fund the purchase of 16 new computers in my wife’s primary school. The old hardware were Pentium III 500 MHz boxes running Windows 98. When I connected the computer room to the DSL router (Linksys WRT54G running DD-WRT), they were all crying for security updates.

Three Minutes With IBM's Linux Leader

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Scott Handy started with IBM in 1983 as a systems engineer and went on to sales, marketing, and strategy positions covering large accounts, channels, small and medium business, and IBM products for Windows NT, Sun Solaris, and OS/2 Warp. Now, as vice president for Linux and open source, he is one of the main public faces articulating IBM's open-source strategy. IDG News Service Senior Writer Elizabeth Montalbano caught up with Handy at the sidelines of the recent LinuxWorld Open Solutions Summit in New York.

French MPs pick Ubuntu for Linux switch

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When French MPs and their assistants return from their summer break this June, they will conduct parliamentary business on PCs running Ubuntu. From the next session of parliament, 1,154 desks will feature the Linux-based PCs.

At the time of the latest IT refresh for parliamentary assistants, France's parliament, the National Assembly decided to switch from Windows to Linux, allowing the 577 MPs to switch to non-proprietary software for the first time.


Thinking about trying Linux?

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You have probably heard about this thing called Linux. Everybody seems to be arguing over it. Is it better than Windows or faster or cheaper. Some say it doesn't support anything while others say it supports more than windows. Your curiosity is aroused and you wonder if you should give linux a try before parting with a few hundred dollars for the latest version of windows.

Mark Shuttleworth: A very good start

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I’m very impressed with the results of the early work being done at the new Linux Foundation, which is OSDL+FSG with a leaner focus on getting things done.

MAYA 8.5

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This upgrade follows hot on the heels of Maya 8, and adds native compatibility with Intel Macs. However, it’s more than just a compatibility fix – the update adds a lot of new features, too, particularly in the field of simulations.

New advances are based around a unified simulation framework called Maya Nucleus. This is a linked particle system that allows simultaneous interactive simulations acting on a variety of dynamic objects. All of your simulations can affect each other and can be affected by the same forces and constraints, such as wind and gravity.

OpenSuse 10.2 Review

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I just got finished installing OpenSuSE 10.2 on my Linux workstation. It had been at 10.0. Overall, it is very painless. It's a lot easier than installing Windows.

Open Source and You

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No one would buy a car with the hood welded shut, but that is essentially what commercial software is. However, since computing began, some software has been distributed in such a way that users can change or repair it by modifying its source code--the step-by-step instructions that the computer executes when the software runs. Software distributed under a license that allows a programmer to modify the source code and freely distribute an improved version of it is called open source.

Crontab Configuration, OpenSUSE 10.2

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At some point several years ago, SUSE and Redhat migrated to new multi-file and sub-directory approaches (search anacron) for their system crontabs. A helpful comment posted to my 2 March entry motivated me to learn how these are set up. Here’s how openSUSE 10.2 structures its cron configuration and provides the means of controlling it:

* YaST, System, sysconfig editor, cron - edits various configuration parameters stored in the /etc/sysconfig/cron file (this file can also be edited directly).
* YaST, System, System Services - turn the cron service on/off here.

Join the KDE Event Coordination Task Force now!

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KDE is visiting a lot of events on a yearly basis. In most cases, the booth is staffed by volunteers. A successful event attendance depends on a number of factors, if those aren't considered, it might end in frustrated, or even burnt out contributors. But getting it right is not just about "went good / bad", there are various shades of grey. Having a look at past events, the most important factors seem to be in two groups, general considerations and planning and per-event planning.

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More in Tux Machines

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" & 8.15 "Nev" Receive Latest Debian Security Updates

After releasing the first Test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system a couple of days ago, today, October 23, 2016, the Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced the availability of new security updates for all supported Parsix GNU/Linux releases. Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" is the current stable release of the Debian-based operating system, and it relies on the Debian Stable (Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie") software repositories. On the other hand Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" is the next major version, which right now is in development, but receives the same updates as the former. Read more

Chakra GNU/Linux Users Receive KDE Plasma 5.8.2 and KDE Apps 16.08.2, Lots More

With great pleasure, Chakra GNU/Linux developers Neofytos Kolokotronis informed the community about the latest open source software projects and technologies that landed in the stable repositories of the distribution originally based on Arch Linux. Just like Arch Linux, Chakra GNU/Linux is a rolling operating system, which means that users always receive the latest updates without having to download a new ISO image and reinstall. And today, we're happy to inform our Chakra GNU/Linux users that they've received the newest KDE Plasma 5.8.2 LTS desktop environment. Read more

Linux 4.9-rc2

  • Linux 4.9-rc2
    I'm back on my usual Sunday afternoon release schedule, and 4.9-rc2 is out. My favorite new feature that I called out in the rc1 announcement (the virtually mapped stacks) is possibly implicated in some crashes that Dave Jones has been trying to figure out, so if you want to be helpful and try to see if you can give more data, please make sure to enable CONFIG_VMAP_STACK. .. and on the other hand, if you want to just not have to worry about _that_ particular issue, disable the virtually mapped stacks it for now, but please do help test. Because 4.9 is obviously shaping up to be a big release (I haven't done the actual stats yet, but I think it's the biggest in number of commits we've ever had), and I think Greg is also planning on making it an LTS release. The two may be related, with people pushing to get their stuff ready. Regardless, the more people who help test, and the earlier in the rc series those people start testing, the better off we'll be. Hint hint. Ok, enough about that. rc2 itself isn't huge, but that's a fairly common pattern: either people just take a breather after the merge window, or it simply takes a while for the fallout of new code to be found, so rc2 is usually a fairly small rc. But we have stuff pretty much all over the map: drivers dominate (gpu drivers stand out, but there's ipmi, clocksource, mmc, pinctrl, HID, scsi, nvme .. you name it). Add some architecture updates (x86 and arm64) and a few filesystems (ext4, nfs, ceph, f2fs), and some VM cleanups and one big fix, and you've covered most of it. The appended shortlog gives the details, and for even more detail you can always go to the git tree itself. Linus
  • Linus Torvalds Announces the Second Release Candidate of Linux Kernel 4.9 LTS
    It's still Sunday in the US, which means that it's time for you to take yet another RC (Release Candidate) milestone of the upcoming Linux 4.9 kernel release for a test drive. That's right, Linus Torvalds just announced the second Release Candidate for Linux kernel 4.9, which lands eight days after the first one and appears to be fairly normal development snapshot that includes lots of updated drivers, mostly for GPU, but also HID, SCSI, MMC, PINCTRL, IMPI, and clocksource, various x86 and ARM64 architecture updates, improvemnts to the EXT4, F2FS, Ceph, and NFS filesystems, and some VM cleanups.
  • Linux 4.9-rc2 Kernel Released
    Linux 4.9-rc2 is now available as the latest test release of this forthcoming kernel update. Over the past week there's been a fair number of merges of bug/regression fixes for this stage of Linux 4.9 development, one week since the closure of the merge window. We've already written a lot about Linux 4.9, including our detailed Linux 4.9 feature overview for those interested in the fun changes of this next kernel release.