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Saturday, 27 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Mozilla Aims to Reduce Firefox Memory Use srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 8:00pm
Story First impressions of Mageia Linux srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 7:02pm
Story Why I love Bodhi Linux srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 6:59pm
Story Other Features Coming Up For Fedora 16 srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 6:58pm
Story LibreOffice: New AND Improved srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 6:57pm
Story Ubuntu 11.04 (Natty Narwhal), Reviewed In Depth srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:58pm
Story Hypervisor Fight Is Good for Customers, Good for FOSS srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:56pm
Story FSF favors LibreOffice over OpenOffice srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:54pm
Story Solving the Mystery of Red Hat srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:53pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 10/06/2011 - 4:57am

The Top 10 Tech Stories of 2006

Filed under
Misc

Mergers, acquisitions, lawsuits, scandals, and battery recalls kept journalists busy in 2006. Here, not necessarily in order of importance, are the IDG News Service's top news stories of the year.

Baby Linux steps

Filed under
Linux

So, you want to give Linux a try do you? Good for you! You'll find that desktop Linux can work well and doesn't come with a tenth of the security problems that makes using Windows such an adventure.

Linux in 2006: June is Busting Out All Over

Filed under
Linux

I apologize for sounding like a typical lame pundit, but 2006 was the Year of Linux. I never said that before—I was waiting until it became true. For the majority of life events, there are no dramatic turning points that initiate radical changes. Most things are evolutionary, especially Linux and the whole Free/Open Source software world. 2006 was no exception.

Running Ubuntu Linux on Acer Tablet

Filed under
Ubuntu

I want to share the experience I gained from the switch over to Ubuntu Linux a few months ago. It might be of some help to other people looking for a superb alternative to Windows.

Desktop Linux--What Happened, And What Didn't, In 2006

Filed under
Linux

Mozilla, Adobe, and Novell made some major news in desktop Linux this year, and smaller developers introduced interesting innovations. But on the whole, 2006 was just about as memorable for what didn't happen on the Linux desktop as what did happen, with interoperability issues of various sorts playing big roles on both sides of that stage.

RSS Aggregators on openSUSE 10.2

Filed under
Software

RSS feeds initially hit my scene around July of 2004. Below is a graph with the results of my evaluations of each of the aggregators. In the first column is each of the criteria. In the next column is how important that particular criterion is to me personally. Then there are the individual aggregator columns. In the left column is my grade for that aggregator. In the right column is my grade multiplied by the weight. At the bottom of each column is the total score for each aggregator. The image links to a spreadsheet that you can download.

Power Management for Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

There are two methods of power management for your laptop; ACPI and APM. APM or Advanced Power Management is the older of the two and works with the BIOS of the computer.

Setting up a Tor server

Filed under
HowTos

This is a short guide on quickly setting up a Tor server in Debian Sarge. The rest of this document assumes that you have a solid understanding of what you're doing. First we'll ensure that we have our clock in sync by using ntpdate:

Stop calling everything blogs!

Filed under
Web

ENOUGH WITH CALLING every site on the (#*&$ing net a blog, people! I know the mass media is filled with dumb sheep that need to spread fear about anacondas in toilets to get ratings, but this has gone too far. What am I talking about? It seems every site that puts up content that is not owned by a major media outlet that has a TV channel is now blogging.

Alternatives to Skype beginning Jan 1, 2007

Filed under
Sci/Tech

My reasons are not the price. Yes, free is appealing and $14.95 / year is by no means a large expense to anyone. My main reason is that Skype does not use a standard protocol for its communication. There are many other SIP options available, most of which use an open communication protocol.

Also: A Free Telephone

Get the most out of Z shell

Filed under
News

Examine key parts of the Z shell (zsh) and how to use its features to ease your UNIX system administration tasks. Z shell is a popular alternative to the original Bourne and Korn shells. It provides an impressive range of additional functionality, including improvements for completing different commands, files, and paths automatically, and for binding keys to functions and operations.

OpenVZ On Debian Etch For Webservers

Filed under
HowTos

Virtualization is a good practice for servers, since it makes things more secure, scalable, replacable, and replicable, all this at the cost of little added complexity. This guide was written during an install of a Supermicro machine with two dual-core opterons (64-bit), two identical disks (for RAID) and a load of memory. Why OpenVZ and not XEN or the recent KVM kernel module? Well, XEN is not very stable for 64-bit architectures (yet), and it comes with quite a bit of overhead (every VM runs its own kernel) due to its complexity. KVM is very simple but restricts you to run a kernel as one process, so the VM cannot benefit from multi core systems.

2006: A year of surprise Linux partnerships. Or, guess who's coming to dinner

Filed under
Linux

It has come to be expected. Linux and open source news in 2006 was a potpourri of topics that included Windows-Linux interoperability, wild acquisitions and corporate spending sprees and stories of enterprise-level companies buying into open source and Linux en masse.

BasKet Note Pads Usability Survey

Filed under
Software

Users of BasKet Note Pads, an advanced notepad application for the KDE desktop, are called to participate in a usability survey. The survey is carried out by the recently launched BasKet Usability Project, a sponsored student project in the "Season of Usability" of OpenUsability.org.

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Put an unpacked .deb file back together Using dpkg-repack

  • Ubuntu Multimedia Center
  • Get to Know Your Hardware Information

Free Open Document label templates from Worldlabel

Filed under
HowTos

The regular readers of this blog will remember me mentioning a competition being conducted by Worldlabel.com in conjunction with the OpenOffice.org documentation project for creating Open Source templates. Guess what..., On the eve of the New Year, they have released the winning template. Using Worldlabel templates in OpenOffice.org is easy.

City of Amsterdam announces experiment with open-source software

Filed under
OSS

The City of Amsterdam said Friday it will spend euro300,000 (US$400,00) testing open source software in two administrative districts in 2007, in a potential blow for the city's current main supplier, Microsoft Corp.

What's New in Symphony OS 2006-12

Filed under
Linux
Reviews
-s

The Symphony OS project released a new version of their unique system on December 13 to the surprise and delight of many in the Linux community. Many feared the revolutionary new desktop might be doomed due to a lack of funding, but developers chugged along through hard times and presented us with the culmination of months of work. Their labors show through in this release. As we're fans, Tuxmachines took Symphony OS 2006-12 for a bit of a test drive. So what's new this time?

Windows Versus Open Source: The Battle for Operating Your Company's Computers is Heating Up

Filed under
OS

IT departments can get pretty catty. There's plenty of behind- the-scenes sarcasm about inexperienced users (such as digs about PBCAK errors - short for "problem between chair and keyboard"), but that pales in comparison to the vitriol they direct at each other in the Windows/open-source debate.

Tweaking KDE 3.5.5

Filed under
KDE

For those of you who have not followed the comment thread on the 'On Favouritism, Apologies, and Black Helicopters' story: I there promised to write an article about all the customisations I do on KDE to make it look and (more importantly) behave in my own preferred way; as a sort of Christmas present, so to speak (it is not like it is a fast news day today). Read on!

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More in Tux Machines

Bodhi Updates, KaOS & Antergos Reviews, Another 25?

Today in Linux news, Jeff Hoogland posted a short update on the progress of Bodhi Linux 4.0 and reported on the updates to the project's donations page. In other news, An Everyday Linux User reviewed Arch-based Antergos Linux saying it was "decent" and Ubuntu-fan Jack Wallen reviewed "beautiful" KDE-centric KaOS. makeuseof.com has five reasons to switch to the Ubuntu phone and Brian Fagioli asked if Linux can survive another 25 years. Read more

Rise of the Forks: Nextcloud and LibreOffice

  • ownCloud-Forked Nextcloud 10 Now Available
  • Secure, Monitor and Control your data with Nextcloud 10 – get it now!
    Nextcloud 10 is now available with many new features for system administrators to control and direct the flow of data between users on a Nextcloud server. Rule based file tagging and responding to these tags as well as other triggers like physical location, user group, file properties and request type enables administrators to specifically deny access to, convert, delete or retain data following business or legal requirements. Monitoring, security, performance and usability improvements complement this release, enabling larger and more efficient Nextcloud installations. You can get it on our install page or read on for details.
  • What makes a great Open Source project?
    Recently the Document Foundation has published its annual report for the year 2015. You can download it as a pdf by following this link, and you can now even purchase a paper copy of the report. This publication gives me the opportunity to talk a bit about what I think makes a great FOSS project and what I understand may be a great community. If it is possible to see this topic as something many people already went over and over again, think again: Free & Open Source Software is seen as having kept and even increased its momentum these past few years, with many innovative companies developing and distributing software licensed under a Free & Open Source license from the very beginning. This trend indicates two important points: FOSS is no longer something you can automagically use as a nice tag slapped on a commodity software; and FOSS projects cannot really be treated as afterthoughts or “nice-to-haves”. Gone are the days where many vendors could claim to be sympathetic and even supportive to FOSS but only insofar as their double-digits forecasted new software solution would not be affected by a cumbersome “community of developers”. Innovation relies on, starts with, runs thanks to FOSS technologies and practices. One question is to wonder what comes next. Another one is to wonder why Open Source is still seen as a complex maze of concepts and practices by so many in the IT industry. This post will try to address one major difficulty of FOSS: why do some projects fail while others succeed.

Red Hat News

  • Red Hat Virtualisation 4 woos VMware faithful
    It is easy for a virtual machine user to feel left out these days, what with containers dominating the discussion of how to run applications at scale. But take heart, VM fans: Red Hat hasn’t forgotten about you. Red Hat Virtualisation (RHV) 4.0 refreshes Red Hat’s open source virtualisation platform with new technologies from the rest of Red Hat’s product line. It is a twofold strategy to consolidate Red Hat’s virtualisation efforts across its various products and to ramp up the company’s intention to woo VMware customers.
  • Forbes Names Red Hat One of the World's Most Innovative Companies
    Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced it has been named to Forbes' “World’s Most Innovative Companies” list. Red Hat was ranked as the 25th most innovative company in the world, marking the company's fourth appearance on the list (2012, 2014, 2015, 2016). Red Hat was named to Forbes' "World's Most Innovative Growth Companies" list in 2011.
  • Is this Large Market Cap Stock target price reasonable for Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT)?

GNU/Linux Leftovers

  • World Wide Web became what it is thanks to Linux
    Linux is used to power the largest websites on the Internet, including Google, Facebook, Amazon, eBay, and Wikipedia.
  • SFC's Kuhn in firing line as Linus Torvalds takes aim
    A few days after he mused that there had been no reason for him to blow his stack recently, Linux creator Linus Torvalds has directed a blast at the Software Freedom Conservancy and its distinguished technologist Bradley Kuhn over the question of enforcing compliance of the GNU General Public Licence. Torvalds' rant came on Friday, as usual on a mailing list and on a thread which was started by Software Freedom Conservancy head Karen Sandler on Wednesday last week. She suggested that Linuxcon in Toronto, held from Monday to Thursday, also include a session on GPL enforcement.
  • Linux at 25: A pictorial history
    Aug. 25 marks the 25th anniversary of Linux, the free and open source operating system that's used around the globe in smarphones, tablets, desktop PCs, servers, supercomputers, and more. Though its beginnings were humble, Linux has become the world’s largest and most pervasive open source software project in history. How did it get here? Read on for a look at some of the notable events along the way.