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Wednesday, 25 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox KDE Wallet for KF5 Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 1:21am
Story The GTX 970/980 Maxwell GPUs Light Up With Nouveau On Linux 3.19 Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 12:52am
Story Manjaro Linux - Works For Me! Rianne Schestowitz 11/01/2015 - 12:45am
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 5:28pm
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 4:11pm
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 4:11pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 4:10pm
Story The 7 best games for Android TV (no controller required!) Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 3:46pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 3:36pm
Story Linux Mint 17.1 "Rebecca" KDE Release and Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 10/01/2015 - 3:34pm

OpenOffice 3: Look out MS Office!

Filed under
OOo

blogs.techrepublic.com: Over 3 years was 3.0 in the making. And just what comes with that three years in development?What you really don’t see from a simple list is just how impressive some of these new features are. But if you look beyond the cosmetic you will see some really impressive work that has gone on.

The Netbook OS Question: Windows XP vs. Linux

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: The netbook revolution is upon us—possibly due to the gotta-have-it factor more than anything else. After all, netbooks practically scream "buy me" from store display tables as a result of their featherweight designs and low prices.

Ubuntu 8.10 has something for everyone

Filed under
Ubuntu

greenhughes.com: As you might know,a new version of Ubuntu was released a few days ago adding some new features and polish to this already fine operating system, and I've been trying out not only Ubuntu itself, but also some other members of the Ubuntu family.

Test your Linux IQ

Filed under
Linux

infoworld.com: You've installed every major Linux distribution on every major brand of hardware. You even carry a USB stick loaded with Linux in your front pocket. For you, the Year of the Linux Desktop was 1996. But how much do you really know about the free OS? Test your mettle with these 20 questions.

Examining Alternative Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

informit.com: Have you tried the major Linux distributions such as Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora/RHEL, and OpenSUSE/SLED? Were they not quite right for your needs? The major distros are not the only game in town. Find out the good, the bad, and the ugly about three of the best-known alternatives to the "big" user distros.

Ubuntu 9.04 Release Schedule

Filed under
Ubuntu

softpedia.com: The Ubuntu 9.04 (codename Jaunty Jackalope) development will start in 4 days, on November 6th, and will conclude next year on April 23rd, with the final release.

Free Imaging software - CloneZilla & PartImage - Tutorial

Filed under
Software
HowTos

dedoimedo.com: This article introduces a pair of excellent, free imaging software solutions that you can use to backup your complete systems.

Gaming and Linux software RAID – Your path to pwnage

Filed under
Software

headshotgamer.com: Hard drives are often forgotten as there isn't a huge amount you can do, apart from buy a Western Digital VelociRaptor. There is one more option though, using two (or more) inexpensive drives and RAID them together to increase the speed dramatically. This way you can get to high speed nirvana without destroying your budget.

Slow startup? Bootchart reveals all

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Ever wondered what takes your Linux box so long to boot up? You can see for certain with the Bootchart package. Bootchart logs the entire startup process and produces a clean, graphical representation of its results suitable for everything from troubleshooting to good old-fashioned bragging rights.

The Linux learning curve is flatter than ever

Filed under
Linux

it.toolbox.com/blogs: One of the biggest so called barriers to adopting Linux is what is called the learning curve. Many people describe the learning curve for Linux to be a steep one. It used to be but not any more.

odds & ends & stuff

Filed under
News
  • Linux *is* granny-compatible, since long

  • Upgraded to Ubuntu 8.10, thumbs up
  • Three years of Ubuntu
  • German Foreign Ministry starts open source blitzkreig
  • Software Respositories in openSUSE explained
  • Linux 2.6.28-rc3
  • Open Source Software
  • A few quick tips for apt
  • The path of least resistance
  • Get Cable, Dish and Local TV Listings Using Bash

Top 40 Firefox plugins, extensions and add-ons

Filed under
Moz/FF

tech.blorge.com: Firefox is a very useful and feature-rich browser, we all know that. But aside from being a robust Web browser, Firefox is appealing to more sophisticated users because of the support that it gets from third-party applications developers.

Ubuntu 8.10

Filed under
Ubuntu

celettu.wordpress: I honestly wasn’t sure if I’d write a review… Still, I figure that if you hate Ubuntu you won’t have read any of them, and if you don’t…you can’t have enough Ubuntu!

Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter #115

Filed under
Ubuntu

The Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter, Issue #115 for the week of October 26th - September 1st, 2008 is now available. In this Issue: Ubuntu 8.10 released, Ubuntu 8.10 Server: significant new features, and Over 6 million Forums posts and counting.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • using KVM on Mandriva 2009.0

  • Half Life & Condition Zero on openSUSE 11.0
  • NDISwrapper in Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex
  • Find the correct number of entries in a directory
  • Detect if daemon is really running

Tips and tricks to tune up KDE 4.1

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

techradar.com: Have you been clinging to KDE 3.5 like a polar bear to the last Arctic ice shelf? If so, now's a good time to consider jumping on to the mainland. The recently released KDE 4.1 is a vast improvement over the original.

What can KOffice 2 Beta 2 offer us?

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: KDE4 isn’t the only application under development rush in the KDE world. KDevelop 4 and KOffice 2 are also being migrated to Qt4 and enriched with new features. This time I’m going to check what KOffice 2 Beta 2 can offer.

Do you really need to install Ubuntu 8.10?

Filed under
Ubuntu

itwire.com: Ubuntu fans rejoice, the latest release is upon us in the form of version 8.10, Intrepid Ibex. But can't you just run a software update in Hardy Heron? I'll tell you what's different down to the package level between an upgraded Hardy installation and a fresh Intrepid installation so you can evaluate for yourself.

Ultamatix

Filed under
Software

mjg59.livejournal: First, let me make one thing clear. This isn't constructive criticism. This is just criticism. It's directed at software that's so wrong-headed that there's no way to make it significantly better, and everyone involved would be much better spending their time doing something else instead of trying to fix any of what I'm about to describe.

Linux Hater's Blog dead, long live the redux

Filed under
Linux
Web

itwire.com: On October 25, 2008, the Linux Hater's Blog reached the "eof", or end of file. But if you've been hassled endlessly by Linux lovers and are sick to death of Linux this and Linux that, fear not - the Linux Hater's Redux is born.

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More in Tux Machines

Mozilla: Rust, Security, Things Gateway, Firefox and More

  • Rust pattern: Precise closure capture clauses
    This is the second in a series of posts about Rust compiler errors. Each one will talk about a particular error that I got recently and try to explain (a) why I am getting it and (b) how I fixed it. The purpose of this series of posts is partly to explain Rust, but partly just to gain data for myself. I may also write posts about errors I’m not getting – basically places where I anticipated an error, and used a pattern to avoid it. I hope that after writing enough of these posts, I or others will be able to synthesize some of these facts to make intermediate Rust material, or perhaps to improve the language itself.
  • This Week in Rust
  • Mozilla publishes recommendations on government vulnerability disclosure in Europe
    As we’ve argued on many occasions, effective government vulnerability disclosure (GVD) review processes can greatly enhance cybersecurity for governments, citizens, and companies, and help mitigate risk in an ever-broadening cyber threat landscape. In Europe, the EU is currently discussing a new legislative proposal to enhance cybersecurity across the bloc, the so-called ‘EU Cybersecurity Act’. In that context, we’ve just published our policy recommendations for lawmakers, in which we call on the EU to seize the opportunity to set a global policy norm for government vulnerability disclosure.
  • Testing Strategies for React and Redux
  • K Lars Lohn: Things Gateway - a Virtual Weather Station
  • Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14 Testday Results
    As you may already know, last Friday – April 20th – we held a new Testday event, for Firefox DevEdition 60 Beta 14. Thank you all for helping us make Mozilla a better place: gaby2300, micde, Jarrod Michell, Thomas Brooks.
  • Supporting Same-Site Cookies in Firefox 60
    Firefox 60 will introduce support for the same-site cookie attribute, which allows developers to gain more control over cookies. Since browsers will include cookies with every request to a website, most sites rely on this mechanism to determine whether users are logged in. Attackers can abuse the fact that cookies are automatically sent with every request to force a user to perform unwanted actions on the site where they are currently logged in. Such attacks, known as cross-site request forgeries (CSRF), allow attackers who control third-party code to perform fraudulent actions on the user’s behalf. Unfortunately current web architecture does not allow web applications to reliably distinguish between actions initiated by the user and those that are initiated by any of the third-party gadgets or scripts that they rely on.
  • Enterprise Policy Support in Firefox
    Last year, Mozilla ran a survey to find out top enterprise requirements for Firefox. Policy management (especially Windows Group Policy) was at the top of that list. For the past few months we’ve been working to build that support into Firefox in the form of a policy engine. The policy engine adds desktop configuration and customization features for enterprise users to Firefox. It works with any tool that wants to set policies including Windows Group Policy.
  • any.js
    Thanks to Ms2ger web-platform-tests is now even more awesome (not in the American sense). To avoid writing HTML boilerplate, web-platform-tests supports .window.js, .worker.js, and .any.js resources, for writing JavaScript that needs to run in a window, dedicated worker, or both at once. I very much recommend using these resource formats as they ease writing and reviewing tests and ensure APIs get tested across globals.
  • Alex Gibson: My fifth year working at Mozilla
    Today marks my fifth year working for Mozilla! This past year has been both fun and frantic, and overall was a really good year for both Mozilla and Firefox. Here’s a run down a few of the things I got to work on.

Fedora Workstation 28 Coming Soon

  • Warming up for Fedora Workstation 28
    Been some time now since my last update on what is happening in Fedora Workstation and with current plans to release Fedora Workstation 28 in early May I thought this could be a good time to write something. As usual this is just a small subset of what the team has been doing and I always end up feeling a bit bad for not talking about the avalanche of general fixes and improvements the team adds to each release.
  • Fedora Workstation 28 Is Shaping Up To Be Another Terrific Update
    Fedora Workstation 28 is shaping up to be another compelling update for those that are fans of this bleeding-edge Red Hat sponsored Linux distribution. I've been running Fedora Workstation 28 snapshots on a few laptops and test machines here and am quite happy with how it's shaped up as another Fedora release that delivers not only the latest features, but doing so in a seemingly sane and stable manner: I haven't encountered any problems unlike some of the past notorious Fedora releases from years ago. Overall, I am quite excited for next month's Fedora 28 release and will be upgrading my main production system to it.

Android Leftovers

Configuring local storage in Linux with Stratis

Configuring local storage is something desktop Linux users do very infrequently—maybe only once, during installation. Linux storage tech moves slowly, and many storage tools used 20 years ago are still used regularly today. But some things have improved since then. Why aren't people taking advantage of these new capabilities? This article is about Stratis, a new project that aims to bring storage advances to all Linux users, from the simple laptop single SSD to a hundred-disk array. Linux has the capabilities, but its lack of an easy-to-use solution has hindered widespread adoption. Stratis's goal is to make Linux's advanced storage features accessible. Read more