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About Tux Machines

Monday, 26 Sep 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story A newbie’s report on Kubuntu srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:27pm
Story Loving and Hating Linux srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:20pm
Story Should Upstream Contributions Count? srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 9:03pm
Story Nouveau GeForce 400/500 Fermi On Linux 3.1 srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 6:24pm
Story You're Living in the Past, Dude! srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 6:22pm
Story Linux Gazette Issue #187: srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 6:18pm
Story Ubuntu 11.10 Alpha 3 Released - Changes and Screenshots srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 5:16pm
Story Top 5 Plasma Widgets for the KDE Desktop srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 5:15pm
Story Top 10 GNOME Wallpapers srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 5:13pm
Story NPC to offer GNU/Linux class this fall srlinuxx 05/08/2011 - 4:08pm

Performing Brain Surgery On Yourself

Filed under
Linux

Some years ago Linux creator Linux Torvalds famously compared changing operating systems to “performing brain surgery on yourself”. I’ve quoted him often because so many people seem to have unrealistic expectations when they pick up a Linux DVD or CD-ROM. I’ve recently received a couple of e-mails in response to my articles here on O’Reillynet that illustrate Linus’ point beautifully.

Install Beryl on Ubuntu Feisty with AIGLX for Nvidia

Filed under
HowTos

This weekend was my Feisty testing weekend, this morning I decided to add Beryl to the mix and, as usual, I’m really impressed with what a community of open source coders can do!

Swedish Armed Forces switches from Windows to Linux

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat announced today that the Swedish Armed Forces would be protecting Sweden with Red Hat Enterprise Linux rather than NT. The Swedes feel much safer. Smile

Also: Texas, Minnesota may abandon Microsoft for open standards
And: Russian Schools to Switch to Linux After Microsoft Piracy Case

Microsoft Drops "Wow", Embraces "Meh."

Filed under
Microsoft

After lukewarm reviews of its flagship operating system, Microsoft has cancelled it's "Wow!" ad campaign and unveiled it's new motto: "Meh."

Also: Weather alert: new Microsoft FUD storm expected
And: 19 Nations Respond, Most File Contradictions on Microsoft's OXML

10 reasons to love and hate your Ubuntu Linux box

Filed under
Ubuntu

It’s been a few months since I started used Ubuntu as my primary workstation. I’ve been trying and “using” Linux since Redhat 5.2 but this time it’s for real. No dual-booting, no wine, no vmware. Just what Linux has to offer by itself. I’m doing web development and design 90% of the time I’m in front of the computer, the other 10% goes to blogging, music and some movies. Ok lets break it down.

Ubuntu, openSUSE, MEPIS, and Kubuntu adventures

Filed under
Linux

Since the whole objective of this personal project was to learn more about Linux, I decided to look on this as an opportunity to try some new version of Linux. With mixed levels of success, I tried the latest versions of openSUSE, simplyMEPIS, and Kubuntu. I went through different install processes many times due to various problems I experienced.

Experiencing openSUSE 10.2 again

Filed under
SUSE

My first contact with openSUSE 10.2 was frustrated. I downloaded 5 ISOs from the mirror site at Japan, and tried to install it on my laptop: Toshiba Portege M500. I spent a lot of time to configure the wireless device: Intel PRO/Wireless 3945ABG, but still failed.

PCLinuxOS with Beryl (on Geo's Laptop)

Filed under
PCLOS

It's one of those YouTube videos folks. View Here.

VMware to VirtualBox

Filed under
HowTos

My tests with VirtualBox went well enough that I decided to move my webserver and mailserver VMs to it (from VMware Workstation 6 beta). VMware does the job great, but VBox is open source and a little faster.

Solution: Converting line breaks

Filed under
HowTos

Linux text files and Windows text files differ from each other in an important aspect. They have a different way to indicate the end of a line. This solution describes how to convert a Windows-like text file to a Linux-like one, and the other way around.

Red Hat vs. Microsoft: Who will win?

Filed under
OSS

Jeff Gould of InformationWeek has an interesting article entitled, "Can Red Hat Rival Microsoft?" He sets it up provocatively, if not accurately. It's a problem, Jeff, if you believe the alternative is truly proprietary vs. open source. But I think the market is moving past that decision.

How to manage source packages on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Sometimes you want the latest version of a particular application, but you find out that it isn't available from the Ubuntu repositories just yet, and most probably it won't be included until the next version of Ubuntu is released. So what to do? You can use the older version that is included in the repositories or build the latest version from source.

Fldigi and amateur radio on Linux

Filed under
Linux

Dave Freese has just released version 1.2 of Fldigi, a popular new program for Linux and FreeBSD which enables amateur radio operators to join their radios and their computers at the hip and create a new kind of ham shack: a digital ham shack. Here's the story behind both the rising popularity of "sound card" digital modes in amateur radio and how Fldigi lets you enjoy enjoy them on Linux.

X.Org 7.2: ATI Open v. Closed Drivers

Last October we had compared the performance of the open-source R300 display driver against the closed-source fglrx driver for ATI Radeon graphics cards. In that comparison a Mobility Radeon X300 was used with X.Org 7.1, but we have decided to take another look at this driver comparison under X.Org 7.2. In this last comparison, the fglrx binary blob had greatly outperformed the open-source driver. While the fglrx driver remains faster, has the performance delta between these two drivers decreased?

The real point of Unbreakable Linux: breaking Red Hat

Filed under
Linux

Following my recent article in which I wrote that neither I, nor several financial analysis firms, were aware of any companies that were planning to deploy Oracle's Unbreakable Linux, a handful of companies have told me that they are giving Unbreakable Linux a try.

BASH Shell: How to run several commands in Sequence or all at once

Filed under
HowTos

If you need to run several commands chain them with a ; (semi colon). It is a control operator or metacharacter.

The Road to KDE 4: Phonon Makes Multimedia Easier

Filed under
KDE

Phonon is a new KDE technology that offers a consistent API to use audio or video within multimedia applications. The API is designed to be Qt-like, and as such, it offers KDE developers a familiar style of functionality.

Kernel 2.6.20 - still no new WLan subsystem

Filed under
Linux

Some days ago Linus released the newest Kernel, version 2.6.20. However, the new WLan subsystem again didn’t make it into the main kernel, and it looks like that it will need some more work.

Interview with openSUSE project leader, Andreas Jaeger

Filed under
Interviews

Wow. What a year 2006 turned out to be for Novell. In case you're not familiar with the Microsoft/Novell deal, let me give you a brief overview. Sometime in 2006, Novell's CEO contacted Microsoft in order to reach an agreement to work together for the betterment of Linux and Windows software. Andreas Jaeger, sat down and talked about Microsoft, Linux and where the MS deal is taking SUSE.

Why it's difficult to hate Linux

Filed under
Linux

Like many others I found myself reading a witty article on the Guardian from Charlie Brooker entitled I hate Macs. The article used the latest advertising campaigns in the UK as a basis for getting it's point across and it made a thoroughly good read. It got me thinking, surely it must be really hard to actually HATE Linux...

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More in Tux Machines

Linux Graphics

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  • My talk about Mainline Explicit Fencing at XDC 2016!
    Last week I was at XDC in Helsinki where I presented about the Explicit Fencing work we’ve been doing on the Mainline Linux Kernel in the lastest few months. There was a livestream of all presentations during the conference and recorded sections are available. You can check the video of my presentation. Check out the slides too.

Linux Kernel News

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    Chill, penguin-fanciers: Linux lord Linus Torvalds is sitting on the egg that is Linux 4.8 for another week. As Torvalds indicated last week, this version of the kernel still needs work and therefore earned itself an eighth release candidate.
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  • Linux Kernel 4.7.5 Released with Numerous ARM and Networking Improvements
    The fifth maintenance update to the Linux 4.7 kernel series, which is currently the most advanced, secure and stable kernel branch you can get for your GNU/Linux operating system, has been announced by Greg Kroah-Hartman. Linux kernel 4.7.5 is here only ten days after the release of the previous maintenance version, namely Linux kernel 4.7.4, and it's a big update that changes a total of 213 files, with 1774 insertions and 971 deletions, which tells us that the kernel developers and hackers had a pretty busy week patching all sorts of bugs and security issues, as well as to add various, much-needed improvements.
  • Blockchain Summit Day Two: End-Of-Conference Highlights From Shanghai
    Financial services firms and startups looking to be the bridge to blockchain ledgers continued to dominate presentations on the second and final day of the Blockchain Summit, ending International Blockchain Week in Shanghai that also saw Devcon2 and a startup demo competition.
  • Testing Various HDDs & SSDs On Ubuntu With The Linux 4.8 Kernel
    Here are some fresh benchmarks of various solid-state drives (SATA 3.0 SSDs plus two NVMe M.2 SSDs) as well as two HDDs for getting a fresh look at how they are performing using the Linux 4.8 Git kernel. After publishing Friday's Intel 600P Series NVME SSD tests of this lower-cost NVM Express storage line-up, I continued testing a few other SSDs and HDDs. These additional reference points are available for your viewing pleasure today. The additional data is also going to be used for reference in a Linux 4.8-based BCache SSD+HDD comparison being published next week. Stay tuned for those fresh BCache numbers.

Behind the GNOME 3.22 Release Video

This is less than usual. The time saving mostly stems from spending less time recording for the release video. At first thought you might think recording would be a breeze but it can be one of the most frustrating aspects of making the videos. Each cycle the GNOME community lands improvement a wide set of GNOME’s applications. So before each release I have to find some way to run a dozen of applications from master. I do this either by: Read more

Games for GNU/Linux