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About Tux Machines

Saturday, 23 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Wayland 1.5 Is Out and Gets a Little Closer to X Sever Replacement Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:39pm
Story PHP Next Generation Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:31pm
Story systemd 213 Arrives with Daemon to Sync System Clock Across Network Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:25pm
Story DNF 0.5.2 Released Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 1:04pm
Story Top 4 open source alternatives to LDAP Roy Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 12:41pm
Story Linux 3.15 Kernel I/O Scheduler Benchmarks Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 11:34am
Story Hands-on with Kali Linux 1.0.7 Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 11:30am
Story Java Doesn't Work on Linux Google Chrome 35, Downgrade Required Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 11:20am
Story Nginx passes Apache as Web server of choice among top sites Roy Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 11:15am
Story Nouveau 2D Rendering Is Much Slower Than Intel SNA Rianne Schestowitz 28/05/2014 - 6:19am

Remember to FLOSS Daily

Filed under
OSS

tycheent.wordpress: In my last post I mentioned Free Libre Open Source Software (FLOSS). Many people don’t know what FLOSS is, but it’s really quite simple.

Low Tech Solution to a High Tech Problem

Filed under
Software

rktoday.blogspot: Sometimes a little ingenuity and a simple approach beats a high-tech solution. Tonight, I thought I would get fancy and try out Compiz-Fusion. I changed one setting that hosed the display. All I could see was a black screen with a few white blocks here and there, along with the mouse pointer. Uh-Oh!

The Burgner project aims to be a complete free burning suite

Filed under
Software

ubuntuland.nireblog: The Burgner project aims to be a complete free burning suite, totally rewritten from scratch: it does not include any code from cdrtools (cdrecord and mkisofs) nor cdrdao, and is not a front-end for these tools.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Reset root Password in Fedora

  • How to view windows XP partitions(NTFS) in Fedora
  • GCC compatibility in Fedora
  • ascii art with LINUX aview
  • Mplayer dvd video ripping example
  • Run KDE in Windows

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Linux the Divine

  • Ubuntu Hardy on Thinkpad x61s
  • FreeBSD 7.0 review
  • Lightweight Software Experiment
  • Down with Windows! Russian schools turn to free software
  • Interesting move concerning Mono on Linux
  • Time for Open Source Software Vendors to Think Beyond Free
  • an interview with kiwinz
  • Buncha Ubuntu Howtos
  • Linux in 30 Seconds
  • 30 Seconds of Linux Funnies

openSuse 10.3 Impressions

Filed under
SUSE

africanxpression.co.za: I have been a Linux nut for many years and have tried many, many distro’s from the early Red Hat versions to Ubuntu, Mepis, Knoppix, Fedora and of course Suse.I have been impressed with Linux as a server platform for many years but as a desktop platform is has been a long, hard road.

Care and Feeding of Baby Linux Users

Filed under
Linux

Carla Schroder: This brand-new Linux user, this refugee from the Redmond wastelands, was stretching her wings and trying to fly. She edited xorg.conf all by herself, though not quite the right way. Now how many new Linux users can even find xorg.conf, let alone have the boldness to muck with it? Or even experienced users? The Ubuntu forums are cram-full of command-line fear and loathing; the very sight of a text file drives them into seizures.

Open Source Contribution Standard

Filed under
OSS

progbox.co.uk: The OSCS is supposed not to govern or provide a barrier-to-entry for projects. It is supposed to be a way to enhance the experience of new contributors by giving them all the information they need to get started, from contacts to process flows. How many people here would like to know just exactly how a package gets into main, or universe for that matter.

Getting Stuff Done on Linux [Part 1]

Filed under
Software

makeuseof.com: One thing you hear often about Linux is that there’s no software for it. This is simply not true. There may not be much proprietary software for it, but there is some, and there are plenty of free alternatives to what most offices use every day.

few more howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Real transparency in urxvt

  • E17 and fake transparency
  • How to: Install Ubuntu packages with HTML link
  • Network Printing on Linux – How to configure your CUPS server
  • How do I print from Windows to a printer on a Linux print server
  • Memory usage on Ubuntu, Install nmon on ubuntu
  • How To: booting another Grub from Grub

Having a Hardy day - Ten steps helping you not to have a hard time upgrading

Filed under
HowTos

screenage.de: So just before the first beta I finally updated my production machine to Hardy after feeling bad about not giving enough effort in testing for the last weeks. In one short sentence: It worked! In a longer sentence: It worked quite well, but…

Why more people don’t use Linux (and why I moved from Ubuntu to MEPIS)

Filed under
Linux

johnlpreston.co.uk: Why more people don’t use Linux? It’s a pain to get set up correctly. For example, I was trying to show off Kubuntu to some friends last Tuesday, and because Kubuntu doesn’t contain any proprietary software, I couldn’t play MP3s or video.

Beginning Linux

Filed under
Linux

talesoftech.blogspot: I find I'm recently getting inquiries from various friends and business associates who say they want to try Linux. So I thought I'll post about it here. So far I've used three Linux distributions (or distros): Xandros, Ubuntu and Gentoo.

Linux and Tom Sawyer

Filed under
Linux

sathyaphoenix.wordpress: There’s one big factor in why Linux isn’t popular on the desktop. Linux is free. I know this sounds like complete dog’s bollocks, but hear me out before judging my sanity.

Confidence In An Open NVIDIA Strategy?

phoronix.com: Back during CES 2008 we reported that NVIDIA may be plotting an open-source strategy. While NVIDIA has yet to publicize their intentions, something does definitely appear to be going on within their Santa Clara offices.

Open source is in our DNA, argues Yahoo! exec

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: I once took Jeremy Zawodny, technical director at Yahoo!, to task for not contributing enough back to open source. Today, Zawodny made it clear that openness and open source are in Yahoo!'s DNA.

Must have live cd’s for the computer savvy kid

Filed under
Linux

linuxowns.wordpress: A live cd is an operating system and the programs on it you can boot from the cd/dvd drive.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Linux Tip of the Day - cat a binary file, oops!

  • Usage of Split command in Linux
  • Post to Twitter from the Terminal Window

Linux Looks Just Like Windows

Filed under
Linux

alexandersarchive.wordpress: Here are some of the operating systems FireFox has been ported to. Xandros Linux has the most realistic version of the Windows taskbar, while Mandrake has that half transparent Start Menu like Vista. Funny how htese different Linux distros saw fit to borrow the Windows GUI pieces that never found their way into Mac OS X.

The REAL reason we use Linux

Filed under
Linux

blog.anamazingmind.com: We tell people we use Linux because it's secure. Or because it's free, because it's customizable, because it's free (the other meaning), because it has excellent community support... But all of that is just marketing bull. They wouldn't understand the real reason.

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More in Tux Machines

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.

Software: Security Tools, cmus, Atom-IDE, Skimmer Scanner

  • Security Tools to Check for Viruses and Malware on Linux
    First and foremost, no operating system is 100 percent immune to attack. Whether a machine is online or offline, it can fall victim to malicious code. Although Linux is less prone to such attacks than, say, Windows, there is no absolute when it comes to security. I have witnessed, first hand, Linux servers hit by rootkits that were so nasty, the only solution was to reinstall and hope the data backup was current. I’ve been a victim of a (very brief) hacker getting onto my desktop, because I accidentally left desktop sharing running (that was certainly an eye opener). The lesson? Even Linux can be vulnerable. So why does Linux need tools to prevent viruses, malware, and rootkits? It should be obvious why every server needs protection from rootkits — because once you are hit with a rootkit, all bets are off as to whether you can recover without reinstalling the platform. It’s antivirus and anti-malware where admins start getting a bit confused. Let me put it simply — if your server (or desktop for that matter) makes use of Samba or sshfs (or any other sharing means), those files will be opened by users running operating systems that are vulnerable. Do you really want to take the chance that your Samba share directory could be dishing out files that contain malicious code? If that should happen, your job becomes exponentially more difficult. Similarly, if that Linux machine performs as a mail server, you would be remiss to not include AV scanning (lest your users be forwarding malicious mail).
  • cmus – A Small, Fast And Powerful Console Music Player For Linux
    You may ask a question yourself when you see this article. Is it possible to listen music in Linux terminal? Yes because nothing is impossible in Linux. We have covered many popular GUI-based media players in our previous articles but we didn’t cover any CLI based media players as of now, so today we are going to cover about cmus, is one of the famous console-based media players among others (For CLI, very few applications is available in Linux).
  • You Can Now Transform the Atom Hackable Text Editor into an IDE with Atom-IDE
    GitHub and Facebook recently launched a set of tools that promise to allow you to transform your Atom hackable text editor into a veritable IDE (Integrated Development Environment). They call the project Atom-IDE. With the release of Atom 1.21 Beta last week, GitHub introduced Language Server Protocol support to integrate its brand-new Atom-IDE project, which comes with built-in support for five popular language servers, including JavaScript, TypeScript, PHP, Java, C#, and Flow. But many others will come with future Atom updates.
  • This open-source Android app is designed to detect nearby credit card skimmers
    Protecting our data is a constant battle, especially as technology continues to advance. A recent trend that has popped up is the installation of credit card skimmers, especially at locations such as gas pumps. With a simple piece of hardware and 30 seconds to install it, a hacker can easily steal credit card numbers from a gas pump without anyone knowing. Now, an open-source app for Android is attempting to help users avoid these skimmers.