Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

GNOME vs KDE

Filed under
Humor

Newsvine: People have been arguing about which Linux desktop environment is better for years. However, we need a "rational" way to decide. So, I've put together a list of things to compare the two.

Achieving Openness: a closer look at ODF & OOXML

Filed under
OSS

Sam Hiser: An open, XML-based standard for displaying and storing data files (text documents, spreadsheets, and presentations) offers a new and promising approach to data storage and document exchange among office applications. A comparison of the two XML-based formats – OpenDocument Format (“ODF”) and Office Open XML (“OOXML”) – across widely accepted “openness” criteria has revealed substantial differences.

Also: Open Source vs. Proprietary -- Category Perspective

Set the shell prompt and themes in Linux /UNIX Terminal

Filed under
KDE
Linux
Gentoo
Software
Slack
SUSE
BSD
Ubuntu
HowTos

Most of us work with a shell prompt. By default most Linux distro displays hostname and current working directory as a prompt. You can easily customize your prompt to display information important to you. You change look and feel by adding colors.

switching to PCLINUX from UBUNTU week 2

Filed under
PCLOS
Ubuntu

fos-softwares: I am now into my second week of using PCLINUX 2007 (PCLOS) and I am really enjoying it. My biggest problem has been finding a podcast client.

Howto: Sun Java Web Start on Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

/home/liquidat: I recently faced the problem of using a java web start application on my machine and wasn’t sure how to do this. It is a small fix others might want to know as well.

Preparations begin for Reiser trial

Filed under
Reiser

InsideBayArea: A courtroom for the murder trial of Hans Reiser was assigned Monday but opening statements aren't slated to begin for several weeks.

Linux Game Review: Nexuiz

Filed under
Gaming

Raiden's Realm: Nexuiz is a 3d first person shooter (FPS) done in the old Quake 1 style of gameplay where graphics weren't as important as was the raw fun of pure deathmatch play. Nexuiz has recaptured that spirit of the original FPS games and worked to improve it to a level equal to or greater than today's best shooters.

Using the Navigator to get around in an OpenOffice Calc spreadsheet

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice.org Training, Tips, and Ideas: I've been talking about using the Navigator in Writer. Here are a few ways to use the Navigator in OpenOffice.org Calc spreadsheets.

Lunch break diversions: PONG! Multiplayer and Lost Labyrinth

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Sometimes the simplest game can be every bit as addictive and fun as monster games like Halo 3 or Gears of War. This is probably the reason why games like Pong still remain popular to this day and continue to inspire developers. While there are probably hundreds of versions of Pong-inspired games out there, one that will appeal to hardcore Pong fans and casual players alike is PONG! Multiplayer, a Firefox extension that allows you to indulge in Pong without leaving the comfort of your favorite browser.

KDE Commit-Digest for 10th June 2007

Filed under
KDE

In this week's KDE Commit-Digest: Umbrello gets a code generator for the D programming language. Further work in Plasma. Initial work to allow the Dolphin file view component to be embedded into Konqueror. More work in the KOrganizer Calendar and KRDC Summer of Code projects, with the start of the Icon Cache, TextTool Plugins in KOffice and Kopete Messenger update projects.

Linus Torvalds remains doubtful on GPL3

Filed under
OSS

infomatics: Linux creator Linus Torvalds remains sceptical about the upcoming third version of the general public licence (GPLv3). "I still think GPLv2 is simply the better licence," Torvalds wrote in a posting to the Linux Kernel Developer mailing list on Sunday.

Why the Dell/Ubuntu Deal Won't Improve Linux's Market Share

Filed under
Ubuntu

itmanagement: Over the past few weeks much has been written about Dell’s decision to offer desktop and notebook PCs that have the Ubuntu Linux distro installed on them as opposed to Windows. But despite the fact that this is a huge step towards making a Linux distro mainstream, I firmly believe this move won’t have any significant positive effect on the Linux market share.

Installing The PHP-MSSQL Module On CentOS 5.0

Filed under
HowTos

As you might have noticed on Centos 5.0, there is no PHP-MSSQL module/extension available in the default yum repositories. So if you want to use it you can alter the PHP binary or you can compile an mssql module/extension. In this article I will explain how to compile the mssql module/extension.

Linux: Translating Kernel Documentation

kernelTRAP: The translation of a some kernel documentation into Japanese led to a discussion as to whether or not it was appropriate to include translated documentation with the kernel source code. One concern that was expressed was that as the number of included translations grows, so would the size of the kernel.

The Grill: Ubuntu Linux's Mark Shuttleworth in the Hot Seat

Filed under
Interviews

computerworld: Mark Shuttleworth made news in 2002 when he fulfilled a lifelong ambition and became the first South African to travel into space, paying $20 million to be a civilian cosmonaut on an eight-day flight aboard a Russian Soyuz spacecraft. In 2004, he founded Ubuntu Linux to bring the operating system to people around the world.

Nixstaller and the inconvenience of do-it-yourself

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Nixstaller 0.2.2 is a command-line tool for creating graphical installers for archived files on Unix-like systems. If that sounds paradoxical, it is. Although Nixstaller is easy enough to learn that you can produce your first installer within half an hour of installing it, much of the process is sufficiently painstaking that it cries out for the automation usually associated with a graphical interface

Why so many Linux distributions?

Filed under
Linux

ITtoolbox Blogs: There are literally hundreds of Linux distributions floating around the net. Any of which is almost the same but not quite like tea. Sorry bit of Hitch Hikers Guide snuck in there. Seriously, there are so many different distributions and they are all very similar to each other with superficial differences to separate one from the other.

Quick First Review of the Dell Ubuntu Notebook Computer Inspiron E1505N

Filed under
Reviews

About.com: One of the three Ubuntu systems Dell started to sell a few weeks ago is a notebook computer, the Inspiron E1505N. Since I was in need of a new notebook computer I decided to order one.

The Panel Applets

Filed under
Software

I' Been to Ubuntu: If you look at the Ubuntu menu, you'll notice that programs are called applications. Given that hint, you can probably guess that an applet is just a very small application. Panel applets are small, single-purpose programs which sit in your panel.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Development News

  • Dart-on-LLVM
    Dart already has an excellent virtual machine which uses just-in-time compilation to get excellent performance. Since Dart is dynamically typed (more precisely, it’s optionally typed), a JIT compiler is a natural fit — it can use the types available at runtime to perform optimizations that a static compiler can’t do.
  • Google Developers Experiment With Plumbing Dartlang Into LLVM
    It's been a while since last hearing much excitement around Google's Dart programming language that's an alternative to JavaScript. This ECMA-approved language is now being used with IoT devices, can still be source-to-source compiled for JavaScript, and the latest is that the Google developers have been experimenting with wiring it into LLVM.
  • A behind the scenes look at Exercism for improving coding skills
    In our recent article, we talked about Exercism, an open source project to help people level up in their programming skills with exercises for dozens of different programming languages. Practitioners complete each exercise and then receive feedback on their response, enabling them to learn from their peer group's experience. Katrina Owen is the founder of Exercism, and I interviewed her as research for the original article. There are some fantastic nuggets of information and insight in here that we wanted to share with anyone interested in learning to programming, teaching programming, and how a project like this takes contributions like this from others.
  • ‘You are Not Expected to Understand This’: An Explainer on Unix’s Most Notorious Code Comment
    The phrase “You are Not Expected to Understand This” is probably the most famous comment in the history of Unix. And last month, at the Systems We Love conference in San Francisco, systems researcher Arun Thomas explained to an audience exactly what it was that they weren’t supposed to understand.

Red Hat and Fedora

  • OpenStack Swift: Scalable and Durable Object Storage
  • OpenStack Swift by Christian Schwede, Red Hat
    In his LinuxCon Europe talk, Christian Schwede from Red Hat talked about how Swift is deployed at large enterprise companies with many of these deployments operating on a scale of multiple petabytes.
  • [Red Hat CEO] 5 resolutions to become a more open leader in 2017
    I'm always looking for ways to help people understand the power of open. And this year, I'm even more committed to showing others how a culture of openness can reinvigorate an organization and generate new opportunities for innovation, whether in the area of software development or beyond. Here are five resolutions we can all make if we want to become more open leaders in 2017.
  • ABR Of Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE:RHT) At 1.47
  • Fedora 26 Planning For A Modular Server Preview
    Fedora Linux has been pursuing a path of modularity whereby modules provide different software purpose/functionality and are integrated/tested at the module level and a unit of delivery itself. With the Fedora 26 release they are hoping to provide a Fedora Modular Server preview build.
  • Factory 2, Sprint 8 Report
    We are on track with respect to three of the four priorities: module build infrastructure will be ready before the F26 Alpha freeze. Our VMs are provisioned, we're working through the packaging rituals, and we'll be ready for an initial deployment shortly after devconf. Internally, our MvP of resultsdb and resultsdb-updater are working and pulling data from some early-adopter Platform Jenkins masters and our internal performance measurement work is bearing fruit slowly but steadily: we have two key metrics updating automatically on our kibana dashboard, with two more in progress to be completed in the coming sprints.

Security Leftovers

  • Truffle Hog Finds Security Keys Hidden in GitHub Code
    According to commentors on a Reddit thread about Truffle Hog, Amazon Web Services has already been using a similar tool for the same purpose. "I have accidentally committed my AWS secret keys before to a public repo," user KingOtar wrote. "Amazon actually found them and shut down my account until I created new ones. Kinda neat Amazon."
  • 5 Essential Tips for Securing Your WordPress Sites
    WordPress is by far the most popular blogging platform today. Being as popular as it is, it comes with its own strengths and weaknesses. The very fact that almost everybody uses it, makes it more prone to vulnerabilities. WordPress developers are doing a great job of fixing and patching the framework as new flaws are discovered, but that doesn’t mean that you can simply install and forget your installation. In this post, we will provide some of the most common ways of securing and strengthening a WordPress site.
  • Google ventures into public key encryption
    Google announced an early prototype of Key Transparency, its latest open source effort to ensure simpler, safer, and secure communications for everyone. The project’s goal is to make it easier for applications services to share and discover public keys for users, but it will be a while before it's ready for prime time. Secure communications should be de rigueur, but it remains frustratingly out of reach for most people, more than 20 years after the creation of Pretty Good Privacy (PGP). Existing methods where users need to manually find and verify the recipients’ keys are time-consuming and often complicated. Messaging apps and file sharing tools are limited in that users can communicate only within the service because there is no generic, secure method to look up public keys.
  • How to Keep Hackers out of Your Linux Machine Part 2: Three More Easy Security Tips
    In part 1 of this series, I shared two easy ways to prevent hackers from eating your Linux machine. Here are three more tips from my recent Linux Foundation webinar where I shared more tactics, tools and methods hackers use to invade your space. Watch the entire webinar on-demand for free.

Games for GNU/Linux