Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 20 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Is the “killer app” argument dead?

Filed under
OS

blogs.zdnet.com: The other day I was talking with a bunch of other tech heads about the ongoing Windows vs. Mac vs. Linux market share war and why. “It all revolves around killer apps,” pipes up one of the tech heads. “The problem with both Apple and Linux is that neither OS has a compelling killer app driving the user base.”

A tour of Empathy IM client

Filed under
Software

opencomputer.net: Listed on the roadmap to Gnome 2.24 is the integration with Empathy, a multi-protocol IM client. For this article I tested Empathy to see how it works and if it is better or worse then Pidgin (currently my favorite IM client).

Linux and Web 2.0: the Killer Combo

Filed under
Linux
Web

blogs.computerworld.com: I have noticed that Linux is a hot topic on Digg right now. The OS - and, let's face it, Linux is easier to define when we just view it as an OS - has been gaining momentum ever since Windows Vista turned into a nightmare for Microsoft.

Also: Why 'Cloud Computing' Is for the Birds
And: Desktop Linux as a Service: Will it Work?

BackTrack4 chooses Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

emanuele-gentili.com: It is a Linux distribution distributed as a Live CD which resulted from the merger of WHAX and the Auditor Security Collection. I talked with Mati Aharoni about new release now in developement, and he said to me that has made the decision to abandon slackware for Ubuntu in next BackTrack version (4).

Leaked: Dell Inspiron 910 (Mini Note) Specs and Release Date

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

gizmodo.com: A few weeks ago we ran some rumored specs of Dell's answer to the Eee, the Dell Inspiron 910 (aka Mini Inspiron and Inspiron Mini). Now we've gotten our hands on the full (internal) 910 web documentation.

And: Linux netbook uses Chinese chip

Music Education With Linux Sound Tools, Redux

Filed under
Software

linuxjournal.com: Four years ago I wrote an article for the Linux Journal about my use of Linux software for music instruction. A lot has changed since then, so I thought I should update that article to reflect my current use of Linux in my work as a music teacher. I'll follow the presentation of materials as I organized it in the original article, but first I'll share some observations about the changing nature of my trade.

building the complete browser for everyone everywhere

Filed under
Moz/FF

0xdeadbeef.com: Since Stuart landed the Qt port into mozilla-central the other day and Ryan Paul wrote an article on Qt and Mozilla I thought it might be worth it to add some context to that work.

Acer Aspire One A110

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

reghardware.co.uk: Thankfully, Acer has taken a slightly more restrained view of what constitutes an SCC. Its Aspire One is available in just three basic flavours. On the desk in front of us, we have the least expensive, most basic model, the 8GB and Linux in MacBook-envy white, the most pure iteration of the SCC concept to date, in our opinion.

Ubuntu goes enterprise

Filed under
Ubuntu

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Ubuntu is well known in user circles as the cool kids' Linux. It's available pre-installed on PCs and laptops from Dell and from numerous smaller computer vendors. What Ubuntu hasn't been known as is a Linux distribution that matters to CIOs and IT managers. Things are changing.

Mark Surman: New Mozilla Foundation Executive Director

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.lizardwrangler: I’m thrilled to announce that Mark Surman is joining the Mozilla Foundation as our new Executive Director. Mark joins us after a long period of getting to know — and being known by — Mozilla contributors.

9 Linux Myth Debunked

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: When it comes to Linux there are 3 kinds of people, those who never heard of it, those who are afraid of it, and those who hate it and spread falsities about it. I don’t really care about the first, they probably aren’t really technologically literate anyways, as long as they have E-mail they are content. While the second group is the result of the actions of the third. Let’s hit two birds with one stone shall we?

Also: Linux Myth #2 - Linux is more difficult to install

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice.org Tips and Tricks Part II

  • Short Tip: Ignore files in svn
  • zypper feature: source and automatic build dependencies install
  • How to install advanced desktop effects in ubuntu
  • Keeping your Home Directory Organized
  • Cook your RAW photos into JPEG with Linux
  • Enabling Multiple CPUs (SMP) in Ubuntu
  • Free your IPODS (on Linux)
  • Bash Files

Ubuntu at Toyota

Filed under
Ubuntu

zen.org: I’m waiting a few hours at the Thompson Toyota, my Prius is getting some minor work done to it to pass state inspection, it still takes a few hours. I wiggle the mouse, and up pops the Ubuntu Heron! Wow!

My first taste of XFCE…

Filed under
Software

meandubuntu.wordpress: Well, I gave KDE a whirl, but it’s not ready for me yet, so I thought I might try out XFCE. The first thing I wanted to do was get mono and mono apps off my system, just to see where that would put me. I lost three apps.

Adventures with Mandriva 2009.0 Beta 1

Filed under
MDV

beranger.org: Using Mandriva has always been a love-hate relationship for me. Mandriva's distros were attractive, but quite buggy. In old times, whatever you could get for free was already outdated: I still remember the frustration. In recent times, it was mostly about the random bugs.

NimbleX 2008 is speedy but flawed

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: NimbleX, a Slackware-based distribution, advertises itself as "the new wave of Linux." However, what is appealing in NimbleX -- its speed and small footprint and the resulting selection of alternative software choices -- will likely strike veteran GNU/Linux users as being very old school.

Fedora to Offer College Scholarships

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Forget special sale prices on calculators and dorm room furniture, Fedora has the ultimate back-to-school offer -- a schloarship program for college-bound students who contribute to free software and the Fedora Project.

And: * Where Red Hat (And Its Partners) Profit Most
* Fedora infrastructure breach?
* Changing Window Manager on Fedora

4 Linux Distros Which Look Like Mac OS X

Filed under
Linux

internetling.com: What a week! I’ve been working on my podcast so I’m a bit behind on posting. Here’s an interesting compilation of Linux distribution which resemble Apple’s Mac OS 10. They might not be identical, but you guys who like Apple’s design might appreciate the fact yu can get something like it, with the nice-on-the-inside GNU/Linux kernel, out-of-the-box. For free.

Forbes rewrites the history of open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: In the name of defining jargon, Forbes this week tries a complete rewrite of open source history. This is accomplished by someone named Dan Woods, who calls his company Evolved Media.

ArchLinux: My ultimate GNU/Linux distro of choice

Filed under
Linux

libreinfo.wordpress: Finally, after testing, using and experimenting with dozens of GNU/Linux distributions during the last 4 years, I’ve found my ultimate distro of choice. It’s ArchLinux. I’ve never been so happy to be a GNU/Linux user as today.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Purism's Linux Phone to Use Convergence for a Unified Experience Across Devices

For Purism, the company that sells quality computers using a Linux-based operating system and are intended to protect user's privacy and freedom, designing a convergent Linux phone is a long-term goal to unify the mobile experience across various devices. Purism's François Téchené shares some initial details on how the company plans to use convergence for their short and long-term design goals of Librem 5, the Linux smartphone that raised more than $2 million on Kickstarter last year, saying they're looking to unify the human experience across different device you might own. Read more

Leftovers: ExeeLinux Show/Unleaded Hangouts, Linux Foundation's CNCF/Akraino and More

  • What’s Holding Linux Back – Unleaded Hangouts
    What’s Holding Linux Back? Obviously we’ve seen some growth, but it does feel like there may be some things that hold Linux back a bit. We discuss.
  • ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
    ExeeLinux Show 18.9 | Mr. Desktop & Mr. Server Ep. 9 – PDisks
  • How Kubernetes became the solution for migrating legacy applications
    In 2015, Google released Kubernetes as an open source project. It was an implementation of Google's internal system called Borg. Google and the Linux Foundation created the Cloud-Native Computing Foundation (CNCF) to host Kubernetes (and other cloud-native projects) as an independent project governed by a community around it. Kubernetes quickly became one of the fastest growing open source projects in history, growing to thousands of contributors across dozens of companies and organizations. What makes Kubernetes so incredible is its implementation of Google's own experience with Borg. Nothing beats the scale of Google. Borg launches more than 2-billion containers per week, an average of 3,300 per second. At its peak, it's many, many more. Kubernetes was born in a cauldron of fire, battle-tested and ready for massive workloads.
  • Akraino, a New Linux Foundation Project, Aims to Drive Alignment Around High-Availability Cloud Services for Network Edge
    Akraino will offer users new levels of flexibility to scale edge cloud services quickly, to maximize the applications or subscribers supported on each server, and to help ensure the reliability of systems that must be up at all times. While several open source projects exist to help solve pieces of the puzzle, nothing currently meets the need for an edge infrastructure solution. Integration of existing efforts in this new project will help deliver ease of use, hardened reliability, unique features, and performance for carrier, provider, and IoT networks.
  • Absolute 15.0 Beta 4 released
    Based on Slackware64-current Another beta... with all the kernel updates, glib and such -- trying to make things easier on beta testers :-)
  • State of Wisconsin Investment Board Has $33.92 Million Stake in Red Hat Inc (RHT)

Security: Updates, Nintendo 'Hackers', Microsoft Windows Back Doors, and FlightSimLabs Malware

  • Security updates for Tuesday
  • Hackers Release Video Of Nintendo Switch Running A Linux Distro
    When it comes to porting software to potentially unsupported devices, hackers are quite comfortable to push themselves beyond the boundaries set by the manufactures.
  • Epidemic of cryptojacking can be traced to escaped NSA superweapon [Ed: It's a Microsoft Windows issue. All versions of Windows (ME onwards) have NSA back doors]
    It all started when the Shadow Brokers dumped a collection of NSA cyberweapons that the NSA had fashioned from unreported bugs in commonly used software, including versions of Windows. The NSA discovered these bugs and then hoarded them, rather than warning the public and/or the manufacturers about them, in order to develop weapons that turned these bugs into attacks that could be used against the NSA's enemies.
  • Flight Sim Company Embeds Malware to Steal Pirates’ Passwords

    Flight sim company FlightSimLabs has found itself in trouble after installing malware onto users' machines as an anti-piracy measure. Code embedded in its A320-X module contained a mechanism for detecting 'pirate' serial numbers distributed on The Pirate Bay, which then triggered a process through which the company stole usernames and passwords from users' web browsers.

Software and Games Leftovers

  • LXD Weekly Status #35
    This past week we’ve been focusing on a number of open pull requests, getting closer to merging improvements to our storage volume handling, unix char/block devices handling and the massive clustering branch that’s been cooking for a while. We’re hoping to see most of those land at some point this coming week. On the LXC side of things, the focus was on bugfixes and cleanups as well as preparing for the removal of the python3 and lua bindings from the main repository. We’re also making good progress on distrobuilder and hope to start moving some of our images to using it as the build tool very soon.
  • Performance Co-Pilot 4.0.0 released
    It gives me great pleasure to announce the first major-numbered PCP release in nine and a half years - PCP v4 - is here!
  • Performance Co-Pilot Sees First Major Version Bump In Nearly A Decade
    The Performance Co-Pilot open-source cross-platform monitoring/visualizing stack has reached version 4.0 as its first major version hike in almost ten years.
  •  
  • Sci-fi mystery 'The Station' has released, it’s a short but memorable experience
    What would happen if we discovered the existence of alien life? A question I've often asked and a question many games, films and books have covered in great detail. The Station [Steam] is a sci-fi mystery that sees you investigate The Espial, a space station sent to research a sentient alien civilization.
  • Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC released, some good content for a small price
    Halcyon 6: The Precursor Legacy DLC [GOG, Steam] was released earlier this month, adding some really nice content at a small price to an already great game.
  • Parry and dodge your way to victory in 'Way of the Passive Fist', launching March 6th
    Way of the Passive Fist [Steam, Official Site] is a rather unique and very colourful arcade brawler and it's releasing with Linux support on March 6th.