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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 27 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story XFS File-System Changes For Linux 3.20 Are Quite Modest Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 7:19pm
Story Upcoming Features of GNOME 3.16 Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 7:19pm
Story Upcoming Features of Fedora 22 Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 7:16pm
Story Will you be my cryptovalentine? Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 7:12pm
Story Ubuntu-Based Exton|OS Distribution Is the First to Include Linux Kernel 3.19 Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 6:55pm
Story ChaletOS Distro Comes with a February 2015 Release - Screenshot Tour Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 6:50pm
Story Introducing Robolinux KDE, an OS That Windows Users Are Going to Love Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 6:47pm
Story PlayStation 3 Support Is Still Being Worked On Within The Linux Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 6:39pm
Story CoreOS and the App Container Spec Roy Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 6:37pm
Story TPM 2.0 Support Sent In For The Linux 3.20 Kernel Rianne Schestowitz 12/02/2015 - 6:34pm

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Five Firefox Shortcuts You Need to Learn Right Now

  • Managing startup services
  • Monitor your server with Monitorix
  • Converting JPG Files to PDF
  • Condensing with Open Text Summarizer
  • Video Tutorial - Sync Sunbird with Google Calendar
  • Basic features of GIMP
  • Vim Plugins You Should Know About, Part II: repeat.vim
  • How to create and extract zip, tar, tar.gz and tar.bz2 files in Linux

Care for some WINE?

Ah the taste of victory. It is sweet. Smile Especially if it is an immense victory over Microsoft.

Market Share of Operating Systems

Filed under
Linux

ultimalinux.com: This chart displays the approximate market share of Windows, Mac, and each of the 312 active Linux distributions as of December 15, 2008. Market share for each of the three major operating systems (Windows, Mac, and Linux) was taken from HitsLink, and is based on data from November 2008.

Novell gets a new/old Linux chief

Filed under
SUSE

cnet.com: Markus Rex, formerly the CTO of SUSE and currently on leave from Novell, is back in the saddle as acting general manager and senior vice president of Novell's Open Platform Solutions business unit.

IBM Sees Linux on Netbooks Making Inroads Vs. Windows in 2009

Filed under
Linux

eweek.com: Linux and open source will start to chip away at Microsoft Windows desktop software thanks to their popularity on netbooks, those ultralight, low-cost laptops. IBM Lotus strategy director predicts this as a major trend in 2009.

From Linux to Windows: Is This 2009 Downgrade Really Necessary?

Filed under
Linux

workswithu.com: While speaking recently with one of my bosses, I was told I will receive a new business laptop in 2009. Now, for the problem: It will be running Windows Vista or Windows XP. Hooray for new gear. Boo for Luddite attitudes.

It is alright to be just a Linux user

Filed under
Linux

nuxified.org: Being a GNU/Linux user is a peculiar thing in that you stand a great chance of being pulled into such hard to define brackets such as "Linux community", "Free Software community" or "Open Source community".

Debian women may leave due to 'sexist' post

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: At least two Debian women developers are reconsidering their participation in the GNU/Linux project following the posting of what they deem to be a sexist message to one of the mailing lists meant for developers.

The Range of Linux Distributions

Filed under
Linux

zdnet.co.uk/blog: A comment from Tezzer to my recent blog post about Two New Linux Beta Distributions got me thinking. Tezzer mentions using Debian, but looking at PCLinuxOS and others for systems that have "issues" with some Linux distributions.

The lizard roars: openSUSE 11.1 coming this week

Filed under
SUSE

arstechnica.com: openSUSE 11.1, the next major version of the company's community-driven Linux distribution, is scheduled for release on December 17. The new version will include updated software and some important new features that enhance the quality of the distribution.

OpenOffice.org: The many views of Impress

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: Presentation software isn't complicated compared to a word processor or spreadsheet. It doesn't need to be. Maybe that's why OpenOffice.org's Impress offers a variety of views of your work.

Thunderbird 3 Beta

Filed under
Software

jonobacon.org: I decided recently to give a new mail client a whirl. Evolution, while an excellent client, appears to be a bit clunky with IMAP. I specifically have all of my mail go through GMail, and I access with IMAP. Evolution seems to be a bit slow when doing this.

Kernel Log: What's coming in 2.6.28 - Part 6: Changes to the audio drivers

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: As the development of Linux kernel 2.6.28 is approaching completion, this kernel log will mention a few changes that haven't made it into the "What's coming in 2.6.28" series so far.

AMD Linux 2008 Year in Review

Filed under
Hardware

phoronix.com: This year has been another interesting year for AMD's Linux efforts on both the open and closed fronts. We are focusing on their Catalyst driver efforts in this article.

How is Microsoft with Vista like the Big Three automakers?

Filed under
Microsoft

computerworld.com: For the first time since Bill Gates strong-armed PC vendors into installing Windows, the operating system has dropped below a 90% market share. That doesn't sound too bad, does it? Well, maybe you felt the same way back in the early '90s when Toyota and Honda started really ripping into General Motors, Ford and Chrysler.

Amazon UK May Cancel G1G1 Global Orders

Filed under
OLPC

olpcnews.com: Heads up to European Give 1 Get 1 donors! Amazon.co.uk may be canceling your G1G1 Global purchase because OLPC is talking too long to ship your XO laptop.

Is it dumb to release a new Linux kernel just for a device driver?

Filed under
Linux

locutus.us: The Linux kernel in all of its entirety is a massive beast. If you wish to compile it as a monolithic kernel of course. Fortunately the kernel can be compiled in a modular fashion. So why do most distributions update the whole kernel when support for new devices come along?

Microsoft and Open Source: The Song Remains the Same

Filed under
Microsoft
OSS

eweek.com: Microsoft has appointed a new point man to put a face on its interaction with the open source community. That man, Robert Duffner, takes on a big task as senior director of Platform and Open Source Software strategy at Microsoft. His IBM and BEA roots will help him place his mark on the Microsoft strategy, but the core message remains the same.

Linux & Zeno's Paradox

Filed under
Linux

oneandoneis2.org: You probably know the one: You wish to get from point A to point B. Before you can reach B, you have to get halfway there. Before you can get halfway, you have to get a quarter of the way. Before you can get a quarter of the way, you have to get an eighth. And so on and so forth, ad infinitum.

Linux--The Lids Will Love It

Filed under
Linux

jdeeth.blogspot: Last year, when my youngest son was 5 ½, he was keeping me company in my home office and found my Linux box. On his own Ethan figured out that the Ubuntu logo was kind of like a Windows start button, navigated through the menu, found the games, and started playing an open source Minesweeper clone.

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More in Tux Machines

GNU/Linux on the Desktop Versus Proprietary Forms

  • Why I use a Mac computer, but an Android phone
    Yes, you could use a flavour of Linux on cheaper hardware, but then you trade the great Mac graphical interface with the ones available to Linux. You can fight me in the comments, but deep down you know I’m right. MacOS comes with Bash, and many of the tools those familiar with Linux would expect to have by default in their favourite distribution, including basics like “whois”, which aren’t installed in Windows by default.
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    The original assumed vision of the Chromebook platform was a laptop and operating system capable of running only the Chrome web browser. You could do anything you wanted, as long as you wanted to stay on the web at all times. Today, the best new Chromebooks can runs apps from three additional operating systems. Not only do Chromebooks run apps, but they run more apps without dual- or multi-booting than any other computing platform. Chromebooks can run apps from Android, Linux and Windows concurrently in the same session.
  • Games, Tests and GitLab CI
    We are getting midterm of the GNOME 3.30 development cycle and many things already happened in the Games world. I will spare the user facing news for later as today I want to tell you about development features we desperatly needed as maintainers: tests and continuous integration. TL;DR: GLib, Meson, Flatpak and GitLab CI make writing and running tests super easy!

Graphics: Vulkan and Vega M

  • Vulkan Virgl Has Kicked Off For Supporting This Graphics/Compute API Within VMs
    Of the hundreds of projects for this year's Google Summer of Code, there are many interesting GSoC 2018 projects but one of those that I am most excited for is Vulkan-Virgl for getting this modern API supported with hardware acceleration by guest virtual machines. As implied by the name, this effort is based upon the Virgl project started by David Airlie and originally tasked with getting OpenGL acceleration to guest VMs using a fully open-source Linux driver stack. Virgl has been in good shape for a while now with OpenGL, while this summer the hope is to get the Vulkan API support going for opening up VMs to using this high-performance graphics and compute API.
  • AMDVLK Driver Lands Half-Float Additions, Many Other Improvements
    There's been another weekly-ish public code push to the AMDVLK open-source AMD Vulkan Linux driver stack and this time around it's heavy on feature work. There has been a fair amount of changes pertaining to half-float (FP16) support including support for the AMD_gpu_shader_half_float extension, prepping for VK_AMD_gpu_shader_half_float_fetch, FP16 interpolation intrinsics and register settings, and more.
  • Vega M Graphics On Intel Kabylake G CPUs Are Beginning To Work Under Linux
    We have been covering the Linux driver upbringing of "Vega M" for the Vega/Polaris graphics found in select newer Intel "Kabylake G" processors. The code is still in flight before it will work in all released versions of the Linux driver components, but for those willing to build the code or rely upon third party repositories, Vega M is now working on Linux. As I have covered in various past articles, the open-source driver support for Radeon Vega M is queued into DRM-Next for the upcoming Linux 4.18 kernel cycle, Mesa 18.1 albeit with new hardware I always recommend using the latest Git (current Mesa 18.2), and there are also binary GPU microcode files needed too.

Plasma 5.13 – Amazing Tux, How Sweet Plasma

Plasma 5.13 is (going to be) a very nice release. It builds on the solid foundation that is the LTS edition, and adds cool, smart touches. The emphasis is on seamless integration of elements, which is what separates professionals from amateurs. It’s all around how the WHOLE desktop behaves, and not individual programs in isolation. And Plasma is making great strides, offering a polished version of an already mature and handsome product, with extra focus on fonts, media and browser connectivity and good performance. There are some rough patches. Apart from the obvious beta issues, those goes without saying, KDE Connect ought to be a true multi-phone product, the network stack really needs to be spotless, and that means full Microsoft Windows inter-operability, Spectacle should allow for configurable shadows and alpha channel, and I want to see if the decorative backend has been cleaned up, i.e. can you search and install new themes and icons without encountering useless errors and inconsistencies. But all in all, I’m quite impressed. The changes are big and noticeable, and above all, meaningful. You don’t just get features for the sake of it, you get things that improve the quality and consistency of the desktop, that maximize fun and productivity, and there’s deep thought in orchestrating it all together. It ain’t just a random bunch of options that happen to work. I like seeing patterns in things, and I’m happy when there’s functional harmony. This spring season of distro testing hasn’t been fun, and Plasma 5.13 is balm for my weary wrists, so hurting from all that angry typing. More than worth a spin, and highly recommended. Full steam on, Tuxers. Read more Also: This week in Usability & Productivity, part 20

Sad News! Development Stopped for Korora and BackSlash Linux

It seems more and more small distributions are facing a had time. Recently we saw the crisis at Void Linux. Now we have two more small Linux distributions calling it quit, albeit temporarily. Read more