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About Tux Machines

Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Dolphin Review – Kubuntu’s Counterpart to Nautilus srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 5:09pm
Story Anyone Can use the Linux Operating System srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 4:54pm
Story Counter-Rant srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 4:52pm
Story 17 things we'd change about names in Linux srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 4:11pm
Story today's howtos & leftovers: srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 5:12am
Story Ubuntu Light | Access the web within 7 seconds srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 2:21am
Story Pardus and Xfce: a bright and powerful parade srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 2:19am
Story 12 killer apps for linux srlinuxx 12/06/2011 - 2:17am
Story today's howtos & leftovers: srlinuxx 1 12/06/2011 - 12:29am
Story Linux is killing Linux on the desktop srlinuxx 11/06/2011 - 10:55pm

Pragmatic Questions about Binary-Only Drivers

Filed under
Linux

The perpetual debate over the legality, practicality, and wisdom of using, distributing, producing, and supporting binary-only drivers flared up again recently. This issue raises passionate debates, and those debates often walk the lines of a false dilemma: freedom versus pragmatism.

Quake cuts off much of Asia Internet

Filed under
Web

Internet and phone services have been disrupted across much of Asia on Wednesday after an earthquake damaged undersea cables, leaving one of the world's most tech-savvy regions in a virtual blackout.

AIX 5L LDAP user management: Active Directory client support

Filed under
News

Get an overview of the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol- (LDAP) related enhancements in the AIX 5L operating system V5.3 TL5 update. This lets clients configure and manage multiple systems with a single set of user identity configuration information, and it simplifies system administration.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to View Hidden Files and Folders in Ubuntu File Browser

  • Change the GRUB Menu Timeout on Ubuntu
  • Show the GRUB Menu by Default on Ubuntu
  • Antivirus on Ubuntu with Avast!
  • How-to get your removable device mounted under an explicit and persistent name
  • Using the Root Account on Debian
  • Creating Filesystems in Linux

  • Rebuilding the Directory for TexInfo
  • Using Gnonlin with GStreamer and Python

  • Configure Wireless From The Command Line

Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the Christmas period I installed Ubuntu 5.10 (Edgy Eft) on my MacBook under Parallels, and I have to say that it’s the most likeable Linux distribution I’ve tried so far.

The Ultimate Distro

Filed under
Linux

The name of Gaël Duval's new distro, Ulteo, with its hint of the word "ultimate", smacks of a certain ambition. But Duval probably means it in the sense that it is the last distribution you will ever need to install, because thereafter it will "self-upgrade automatically," as the announcement of the alpha release put it. Ease-of-use has been a constant theme in Duval's work.

Ubuntu 6.10 (EdgyEft) vs. SUSE 10.1 on an HP Pavilion dv2000

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Lee commented that the HP Pavilion dv2000 is well supported by Ubuntu/Kubuntu Linux 6.10 (aka EdgyEft). In particular, he mentioned that sound worked, and the extra row of blue-lit multimedia buttons at the top works. That sounded very interesting, so I decided to have a try. I use Gnome, not KDE, as my desktop, so I chose to look at Ubuntu, not Kubuntu (which Lee uses).

Finally user-friendly virtualization for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The upcoming 2.6.20 Linux kernel is bringing a nice virtualization framework for all virtualization fans out there. It's called KVM, short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine. This article tries to explain how it all works, in theory and practice, together with some simple benchmarks.

Linux - Room for Improvement

Filed under
Linux

This month's column was supposed to be a look at openSUSE 10.2. Here's what I have to report thus far: openSUSE 10.2 is the only distribution that has stubbornly refused to install on my current test machine, an older Dell Dimension 8100 desktop. But one obstacle has led to another, and so far I'm nowhere near the finish line. Here's my current wish list.

Editing Debian alternatives graphically with galternatives

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever been tinkering under the hood only to discover later that you blew up one of your defaults? Say your default web-browser, so that when you click a link from email it opens Firefox instead of Konqueror or vice-versa. Well I know I have. Here we'll look at how to fix this, graphically.

Mark Shuttleworth: Plan, execute, DELIVER

Filed under
Ubuntu

We are a somewhat chaotic crowd, the software libre army. Thousands of projects (hundreds of thousands, if you consider Sourceforge as a reference point). Hundreds of thousands of contributing developers from virtually every country and timezone. We are a very loosely coupled bunch.

Gameforge get rights for Saga of Ryzom

Filed under
Gaming

Mediabiz reports that the German publisher Gameforge got all rights for Saga of Ryzom from the French game developer Nevrax. Nevrax will be merged with the new founded Gameforge SARL located in Paris.

Google Toolbar 3.0 beta improves browsing experience

Filed under
Software

The Google Toolbar 3 (GT3) beta for Firefox, released earlier this month, includes a slew of new features, including bookmarks, integration with Google Apps, and customizable buttons. I tested the toolbar with Firefox 2.0 and Flock 0.7.9. Once I had it installed, I signed out of Google services and signed in using the Google Toolbar sign-in feature

Why Microsoft/Novell is good for Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Being aware, as I am, of Microsoft's monopolisation endeavours, coupled with working in a Linux world inherently mistrustful of the software giant, it may seem strange that I believe the Microsoft/Novell agreement will be great for Linux. But I do. Why?

Display top CPU processes Using htop

Filed under
HowTos

htop is a very competent interactive process viewer for the shell, providing all the functionality - and more - that the top utility does, in an easier and more intuitive way. htop provides easy-to-use menus for most operations and also has support for using a mouse.

Creating a managed website—Part 2

Filed under
HowTos

Free software Content Management Systems (CMS) are capable of running most websites these days. Indeed, low initial costs and strong community-based support mean that many sites which can’t afford a proprietary CMS can now benefit from the facilities a CMS provides. I’ll get down to the nitty gritty of selecting a CMS, installing it and setting up and promoting your site.

Smarter YaST Control Center for openSUSE 10.2

Filed under
Software

If you're annoyed by the openSUSE 10.2 YaST Control Center not remembering its last size (but starting always too small/with one column) as me, my home project in the openSUSE Build Service has a yast2-control-center package which does.

In search of perfect font rendering on Linux

Filed under
HowTos

One of the greatest challenges I’ve had with Linux is getting text to render simultaneously attractively and readably. The good news is, after a lot of tinkering, I think I’ve got it more or less down pat. What follows are some basic instructions as to what I did.

Keeping your system tidy: creating simple packages

Filed under
HowTos

Installing software on a GNU/Linux system is often as simple as opening a package management interface, selecting with the mouse which packages you want installed, and letting the package management system install the wanted packages—plus, any dependencies required for the package to run. But what can you do if you want to install software which is not already packaged in your distribution of choice, and you still want it to be registered in your package management system for easy maintenance?

ASUS P5N-E SLI

Filed under
Hardware
Reviews

When the 680i chipset was launched last month, it proved to have exactly what the enthusiast was after. However, most of those boards range in the $250 area. ASUS has just released their new P5N-E SLI board which offers the 650i chipset. It's a scaled down version of it's bigger brother, but costs far less and still contains a huge punch for enthusiasts.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • The Begining
    The friendship/relationship with the awesome community of GNOME begins. What followed after 2 commits into the main branch, one application submission, and the result was the start of the most amazing few months. These months have been a humbling experience, the biggest learning experience, and the most productive time.
  • GTK+ Tester Window?
    For an internal application, I’ve created a Gtk.Window derived tester class, added some widgets to show current test, status, number of fails and a Gtk.Grid to attach custom widgets. This class expose some API to set a widget to test, autoclose and some signals you can use to run some tests.
  • GUADEC 2016
    A lot of great things happened – as always GUADEC with it’s perfect size got me to speak to a hell lot of new and interesting people. Thank you all for being there – it was a pleasure.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • #MyOpenHA Part 1 -Philosophy
    Home Automation. The holy hipster and geek grail. I have played with it. I have tried. I have failed. But today I am proud to have a solution I can truly endorse. So join me on this journey. This series will explain my solution, in excruciating detail. In the hope that I can learn from you while I am explaining. This series will be filled over time with more and more articles. But now, let’s talk about philosophy. The Why. Soon you will see the What and How. One promise, or the TL;DR: It is all 100% Open Source. Well, almost. I have integrated some quite non-open things but always in an Open Source Way.
  • Disable the new Firefox 48 location bar - Tutorial
    Here we are. Seven minutes later, our life is bearable again, but not perfect. Thank you Mozilla, thank you very much. This is exactly what I needed to enrich my life. After all, we all know, cosmetic changes are good, because that's what plants crave. Stop with these idiotic tweaks please. No one cares. It won't make the browser better. It won't change the market share. It will not attract idiots, as idiots are happy. It will only alienate diehard users who keep on using your browser because they have no alternative. From a loved favorite to the least of evils choice. That's what Firefox has become.
  • What’s Happening in OpenStack-Ansible (WHOA) – August 2016
    My goal with these posts is to inform more people about what we’re doing in the OpenStack-Ansible community and bring on more contributors to the project.
  • PowerShell on Linux? No, Thank You [comic]
  • LLVM Might Get An AAP Back-End (Altruistic Processor)
    There's an active proposal to incorporate a back-end into LLVM for AAP, a processor ISA for deeply-embedded Harvard architectures. AAP is designed for FPGA usage and there is an open-source soft-core with commercial deployments also being available. AAP is short for the Altruistic Processor and is described in technical detail here. AAP is said to be an original design but inspired by the OpenRISC / RISC-V projects.
  • UK-French Data Taskforce publishes joint report
    "Invest in and share experiences building core data registers, learning from the French National Address Database experience”; “develop initiatives to bring basic data literacy into primary and secondary education”; and “commission research into algorithmic transparency and accountability” are among the recommendations listed in a report published in July by the joint French-UK Data Taskforce.
  • Tuscany: how to promote the economy of sharing and collaboration
    In June, the region of Tuscany (Italy), in collaboration with Open Toscana and ANCI Toscana, launched a project, the goal of which is to “build a regional policy on the economy of sharing and collaboration”.
  • MS Tries But Just Doesn’t Get FLOSS
    This is what drove me to GNU/Linux so many years ago.
  • Microsoft's maps lost Melbourne because it used bad Wikipedia data
    Microsoft has laid part of the blame for Bing Maps' mis-location of the Australian city of Melbourne by a whole hemisphere on Wikipedia. Yes, Wikipedia, “the free encyclopaedia that anyone can edit.” Microsoft made its admission after your correspondent took to Twitter on Monday to do what we in publishing call “pimping"the story of Melbourne's mis-placement. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, noticed that pimping and responded as follows.
  • Northern Ireland promotes Open Data in education
    The Northern Ireland Department of Finance has supported a challenge that encourages the re-use of public Open Data in education. Called the OpenDataNI Challenge – Using Open Data for Education” (ODNI4EDU), this project, officially launched on June 14, intends to award two applications or educational tools and resources that make use of at least one dataset published on the portal OpendataNI.
  • Try this handy tool to convert a Web site into a native app with Electron
  • Introducing CloudiumOS [Ed: built on Electron]
    It is a complete multi platform operating system that allows you to manage your documents, access your media files and collaborate with other people on the go. CloudiumOS can work side-by-side with another operating system (either via a VM, a Desktop app or Mobile App) or as a standalone installation.

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers