Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Today in Techrights Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:30am
Story Quick Look: Puppy Linux 6.0 Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 10:04am
Story How to train your doctor... to use open source Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 9:14am
Story Sony Xperia devices are sendng your data to China Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 8:18am
Story Nexus 6 Pre-Orders Were A Joke Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 8:11am
Story Fedora 21 Beta status is Go, release on November 4, 2014 Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 8:00am
Story GTK+ 3.16's New GtkGLArea Widget Gets Improved Roy Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 7:57am
Story CherryTree Review: The Rich Tree Notes Application Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 7:52am
Story The Wide World of Canonical Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 7:47am
Story Boycott Linux, Fedora Beta a Go, and Drupal Yikes Rianne Schestowitz 31/10/2014 - 7:36am

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 35

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #35 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this issue: openSUSE 11.1 Alpha2 is available, Linux Distribution Popularity Across the Globe, and openSUSE to add SELinux Basic Enablement in 11.1.

OpenOffice.org Impress: Using Master Slides

Filed under
OOo

linuxjournal.com: The Master view in Impress is the equivalent of page styles in Writer. It's the view where you can set elements of design that appear throughout your presentation, such as the slide background and foreground colors, any reoccurring elements, and the fonts. By creating the master slides you need before you add content, you can automate your work and free yourself to focus on content.

FOSS Is More Valuable Than $60 Billion

Filed under
OSS

linuxtoday.com: So let me tell you how my day went. It started at 7am on my back deck. I usually start my workday there when the weather is nice. It's cool, the bugs aren't awake yet, and it's just plain nice to be outside.

Oops! I Fixed the Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: When Linux crashes, users don't get a Blue Screen like they do on Windows. Instead, Linux generates an "oops" -- a crash signature that can help developers to figure out what went wrong. The feature may have a silly name, but it's increasingly serious business.

How do we attract the next generation?

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Once upon a time, Red Hat did sell its software in a shrink wrapped box and you could find it on the shelf next to Windows98. But that was then and this is now. What are we doing to expose new users to Linux and Open Source solutions?

Hidden Linux : Test Driving KDE 4.1

Filed under
KDE

blogs.pcworld.co.nz: KDE 4.1 was released at the end of July and you can add it to any Ubuntu installation with a simple repository update. Add is the operative word here. It's basically a no-risk operation since 4.1 will happily co-exist with your current version of KDE or Gnome.

Acetoneiso2 - A full feature rich Image/ISO tool for openSUSE

Filed under
Software

susegeek.com: AcetoneISO2, is a feature-rich and complete software application to manage CD/DVD images. Thanks to powerful open source tools such as fuseiso, AcetoneISO2 will let You mount typical proprietary images formats of the Windows world such as ISO BIN NRG MDF IMG and is more than a simple ISO mount software.

Seinfeld target is not open source

Filed under
Microsoft

blogs.zdnet.com: Jerry Seinfeld and Superman for American ExpressI have been reading up on Jerry Seinfeld’s deal with Microsoft and this much seems very clear. Open source is not his target.

Software Freedom Day Worth Celebrating

Filed under
OSS

fanaticattack.com: Software Freedom Day is an annual grass roots effort to educate the public on the virtues of free and open source software. The 2008 event takes place on September 20 and will be celebrated in 65 countries across the globe. So exactly what is this open source movement and why are people celebrating it? Moreover, why should you care?

Ma.gnolia Goes Open Source - Will it Matter?

Filed under
Software

readwriteweb.com: Ma.gnolia, one of the most popular second tier social bookmarking services on the web, announced today at the Gnomedex conference in Seattle that the company has thrown itself to the mercy of the development community and is going to make its code available in open source.

Using Evolution for Time Management

Filed under
Software

lawofficelinux.com: I've been struggling with the best way to organize and handle my time. Here's what I have come up with. My time and case management is based of Gnome Evolution.

First Opera 9.60 Snapshot

Filed under
Software

my.opera.com: Hot on the heels of Wednesday's 9.52 release comes our first snapshot of 9.60. Everyone here at on the Desktop Team has been working hard to add new features to your favorite browser, and here's what you can look forward to in 9.60:

Ulteo Application System is innovative, easy, and a little buggy

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Ulteo Application System is a GNU/Linux distribution based on Kubuntu and designed to work with the Ulteo Online Desktop service to provide you with an automatic offsite backup and file synchronization between live CD instances. It attempts to require as little user configuration and maintenance as possible, and provides several unique features that set it apart from being "just another distribution."

A Second Taste of KDE: Laptop Flavor

Filed under
KDE

meandubuntu.wordpress: Although KDE 4.1 was not ready for my multi-headed desktop, I eventually realized I could give it a shot on my laptop. Since my laptop is practically a thin-client for my desktop right now, I can be a little more daring with it.

GIMP 2.5.3 Development Release

Filed under
GIMP

gimp.org: GIMP 2.5.3 is a fresh snapshot from the 2.5 development series. It gives developers and interested users a sneak preview of the upcoming GIMP 2.6 release.

Review : gOS 3 Gadgets(beta)

Filed under
Linux

linuxondesktop.blogspot: Since then as gOS has moved from Ver 2.0 to 3.0, it has undergone a number of major changes and has become even more user friendly. Version 3.0 gOS has moved from using Enlightenment desktop manager to LXDE.

Nerrivik - Beta 1 of Amarok 2.0 released!

Filed under
Software

amarok.kde.org: The Amarok team is proud to announce the first beta version of Amarok 2, codenamed Nerrivik, released after days of hard work during this year's Akademy in Belgium. It contains a considerable amount of improvements over the previous alpha versions, bringing Amarok one step closer to the 2.0 release.

Review: Linux Software Installer

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: The Linux Software Installer (LSI) is a simple, universal frontend to what is essentially a tweaked debian (.deb) package system. LSI is, in my humble opinion, identical to the Linux Mint Installer in nearly every way, save one.

Red Hat Infrastructure report

Filed under
Linux
Security

redhat.com: Last week we discovered that some Fedora servers were illegally
accessed. The intrusion into the servers was quickly discovered, and the
servers were taken offline.

Hands on: Hardy Heron hassle

Filed under
Ubuntu

whatpc.co.uk: I use both Windows and Linux and have been a long-time fan of Ubuntu, which for those unfamiliar with it is one of the most popular distros around. And justifiably so, as it delivers a lot of functionality in a format that’s easy to get to grips with, making it a good choice. Unfortunately, the latest implementation appears to have a significant bug.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.