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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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The future of Unix Part 1: IBRS' view

Filed under
OS

searchcio.com.au: In these interviews, TechTarget ANZ's Ian Yates speak with analyst Kevin McIsaac from IBRS, Sun Microsystems' Laurie Wong and IBM's Phil MacLouchlainn. The hypothetical is the death of Unix at the hands of Linux.

Most Anticipated Release

openSUSE 10.3
45% (271 votes)
Mandriva 2008
13% (76 votes)
*Ubuntu 7.10
33% (196 votes)
Fedora 8
6% (35 votes)
Gentoo 2007.1
4% (25 votes)
Total votes: 603

Review: openSUSE 10.3

Filed under
SUSE

the distrogue: After some assorted mishaps with some preview releases of openSUSE 10.3, it's finally stable enough for production use. And while I'm pleased with the result, I can't get rid of the feeling that the openSUSE team can do better.

Pluggable Security

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "I think the decision to merge Smack is something that needs to be considered in the wider context of overall security architecture," suggested James Morris following Andrew Morton's recent comment.

Also: Virtual Compound Page Support
And: Andrew Morton's 2.6.24 merge plans

Only 5% of UK firms always choose open source

Filed under
OSS

CBR: Only 5% of the 300 IT executives surveyed by Computer Business Review said they always opted for open source whenever possible, while three-quarters said it depended on the individual project. One in four of the companies had made it policy to avoid open source.

YaST Survey Started

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse news: We have just published a survey on YaST, our systems management and installation framework. If you use any of the distributions openSUSE, SUSE Linux, SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop or SUSE Linux Enterprise Server, I encourage you to participate in our survey to support us improving YaST.

Arch Leadership

Filed under
Linux

archlinux.org: I plan to step down as leader of Arch Linux and pass the torch. The reason for this is that I do not have the time to devote towards a leadership role in a project the size of Arch Linux, and Arch deserves someone who does. It needs some work, it needs some unification, and it needs someone at the helm who can devote a lot of time to it.

SamePlace: A Jabber client for Firefox

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you spend most of your computing life in Firefox, it makes sense to consolidate other online activities in your browser. There are extensions that can help you to do just that: you can manage your bookmarks with the del.icio.us extension, chat on IRC channels using Chatzilla, and read RSS feeds in Sage. Jabber instant messaging users have their own extension: the SamePlace, a nifty IM client that, besides the basic Jabber functionality, offers a few unique and useful features.

Linux Application Hardening

Filed under
Linux

sys-con.com: When we talk about Linux hardening, we typically mean runtime application hardening to improve application reliability, leading to expected and predictable execution despite undesirable operating conditions.

Driving Linux

Filed under
Linux

internetnews.com: Among the issues that Linux users, hardware and peripheral vendors may run into when trying to get into Linux is the issue of driver availability. Enter the Linux Driver Project. Led by Novell staffer Greg Kroah-Hartman, the group is aiming to get drivers and Linux users aligned.

How much is Microsoft's patent protection worth?

Filed under
Linux

matt asay: For those who can't be bought, just how much protection are you missing? Not very much, it seems to me, and to a range of open-source legal experts I e-mailed to solicit their opinions.

Basic Linux Tips and Tricks, Part 1

Filed under
Linux

linux planet: This article is intended for people who have some computer expertise, even if it's Windows-only. At a minimum, you should be comfortable with the MS-DOS command line in Windows and have done a bit of Windows Registry editing to give you some experience with configuration files.

New Partnership Extends Linux Foundation’s Work with Japanese Developers

Filed under
Linux

PR: The Linux Foundation and the Information-technology Promotion Agency today announced the signing of a collaboration agreement. The LF and IPA will work together to accelerate adoption of Linux and open source software in areas of technology development, standardization and legal activities.

Ease of Use: But For Who?

Filed under
Linux

blogs.techrepublic.com: I think Linux developers are targeting the wrong people. I think, in a number of instances, Linux developers are targeting themselves as the key user group for their tools. What made me come to that conclusion might surprise you.

FOSS: The major players in Linux and free- and open-source software

Filed under
OSS

iTWire: As free and open source software receives greater attention and recognition, several companies and packages are emerging as clear leaders and important influencers as well as visionaries that are sure to make a mark in the very near future. Here are my picks for who’s making a mark today and tomorrow on the FOSS world.

Open Source Gaming Review: Assault Cube 0.92

Filed under
Gaming

raiden's realm: Assault Cube is an open source 3d shooter done in the old school deathmatch style of gameplay, but with much newer graphics. Gameplay is especially good in this game due to the way it's implemented.

Watching Your Power Consumption With Powertop On Fedora 7

Filed under
HowTos

Powertop is a command-line tool released by Intel that shows you the power consumption of the applications running on your system. It works best on notebooks with Intel mobile processors and can help you find out the programs that put a strain on your notebook battery.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 222

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: First look at PC-BSD 1.4

  • News: openSUSE 10.3 ready for download, Mandriva closes "Club", interview with Clement Lefebvre, Sabayon Linux updates, Ubuntu "Gutsy" new features
  • Released last week: Linux Mint 3.1, Red Flag Linux 6.0
  • Upcoming releases: openSUSE 10.3, Mandriva Linux 2008
  • Site news: Meet Jim Putman, the DistroWatch Podcast guy
  • Donations: Damn Small Linux receives US$350
  • New additions: Ubuntu Muslim Edition
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

New Compiz Fusion git packages

Filed under
Software

cyberorg: The packages in home:cyberorg repository are now synced to 30 Sep git checkout. 3D plugin is back, thanks to maniac and onestone, it is much better now.

Flash Player 9 Update

Filed under
Software

labs.adobe.com: A new version of Flash Player 9 Update was released on October 1, 2007. This update, codenamed “Moviestar,” includes new features, enhancements and bug fixes for Windows, Macintosh, and Linux versions of Flash Player 9.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: OSS

  • Anonymous Open Source Projects
    He made it clear he is not advocating for this view, just a thought experiment. I had, well, a few thoughts on this. I tend to think of open source projects in three broad buckets. Firstly, we have the overall workflow in which the community works together to build things. This is your code review processes, issue management, translations workflow, event strategy, governance, and other pieces. Secondly, there are the individual contributions. This is how we assess what we want to build, what quality looks like, how we build modularity, and other elements. Thirdly, there is identity which covers the identity of the project and the individuals who contribute to it. Solomon taps into this third component.
  • Ostatic and Archphile Are Dead
    I’ve been meaning to write about the demise of Ostatic for a month or so now, but it’s not easy to put together an article when you have absolutely no facts. I first noticed the site was gone a month or so back, when an attempt to reach it turned up one of those “this site can’t be reached” error messages. With a little checking, I was able to verify that the site has indeed gone dark, with writers for the site evidently losing access to their content without notice. Other than that, I’ve been able to find out nothing. Even the site’s ownership is shrouded in mystery. The domain name is registered to OStatic Inc, but with absolutely no information about who’s behind the corporation, which has a listed address of 500 Beale Street in San Francisco. I made an attempt to reach someone using the telephone number included in the results of a “whois” search, but have never received a reply from the voicemail message I left. Back in the days when FOSS Force was first getting cranked up, Ostatic was something of a goto site for news and commentary on Linux and open source. This hasn’t been so true lately, although Susan Linton — the original publisher of Tux Machines — continued to post her informative and entertaining news roundup column on the site until early February — presumably until the end. I’ve reached out to Ms. Linton, hoping to find out more about the demise of Ostatic, but haven’t received a reply. Her column will certainly be missed.
  • This Week In Creative Commons History
    Since I'm here at the Creative Commons 2017 Global Summit this weekend, I want to take a break from our usual Techdirt history posts and highlight the new State Of The Commons report that has been released. These annual reports are a key part of the CC community — here at Techdirt, most of our readers already understand the importance of the free culture licensing options that CC provides to creators, but it's important to step back and look at just how much content is being created and shared thanks to this system. It also provides some good insight into exactly how people are using CC licenses, through both data and (moreso than in previous years) close-up case studies. In the coming week we'll be taking a deeper dive into some of the specifics of the report and this year's summit, but for now I want to highlight a few key points — and encourage you to check out the full report for yourself.
  • ASU’s open-source 'library of the stars' to be enhanced by NSF grant
  • ASU wins record 14 NSF career awards
    Arizona State University has earned 14 National Science Foundation early career faculty awards, ranking second among all university recipients for 2017 and setting an ASU record. The awards total $7 million in funding for the ASU researchers over five years.

R1Soft's Backup Backport, TrustZone CryptoCell in Linux

  • CloudLinux 6 Gets New Beta Kernel to Backport a Fix for R1Soft's Backup Solution
    After announcing earlier this week the availability of a new Beta kernel for CloudLinux 7 and CloudLinux 6 Hybrid users, CloudLinux's Mykola Naugolnyi is now informing us about the release of a Beta kernel for CloudLinux 6 users. The updated CloudLinux 6 Beta kernel is tagged as build 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.26 and it's here to replace kernel 2.6.32-673.26.1.lve1.4.25. It is available right now for download from CloudLinux's updates-testing repository and backports a fix (CKSIX-109) for R1Soft's backup solution from CloudLinux 7's kernel.
  • Linux 4.12 To Begin Supporting TrustZone CryptoCell
    The upcoming Linux 4.12 kernel cycle plans to introduce support for CryptoCell hardware within ARM's TrustZone.

Lakka 2.0 stable release!

After 6 months of community testing, we are proud to announce Lakka 2.0! This new version of Lakka is based on LibreELEC instead of OpenELEC. Almost every package has been updated! We are now using RetroArch 1.5.0, which includes so many changes that listing everything in a single blogpost is rather difficult. Read more Also: LibreELEC-Based Lakka 2.0 Officially Released with Raspberry Pi Zero W Support

Leftovers: Gaming