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About Tux Machines

Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Why Does the Linux Desktop So Lack Proprietary Apps? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 5:11pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 409 srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 3:03pm
Story Linux: Not for Lovers? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 3:00pm
Story Ubuntu breaks from the Linux pack srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 2:58pm
Story Do we still need the FSF, GNU and GPL? srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 2:56pm
Story MegaGlest Amazing Strategy Game Chris7mas 13/06/2011 - 5:42am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 4:39am
Story A Glimpse At The Next Generation Of Firefox srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 4:33am
Story Counter-FUD srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 1:28am
Story Measuring Android’s Fail Points srlinuxx 13/06/2011 - 1:26am

First phase of Korea's open-source city is high success

Filed under
OSS

Following the trend of open source adaptation in major cities worldwide, one of the major Korean cities, Gwangju Metropolitan City, successfully jumped onto the open source transition, receiving spotlight from related industry.

The Netizen's Guide: Web Browsers Beyond Explorer; Firefox Heats Up

Filed under
Moz/FF

As you surf the Internet, you may not notice what Web browser you use. It's also likely you don't know your browser's specifics, its edition (version) or even how old it is. It's very likely you don't spend your evenings pondering ways to improve it. You probably know more about your toothbrush. Netizen spoke recently with Asa Dotzler, who works for Mozilla's community outreach efforts.

Red Hat Soldiering On

Filed under
Linux

What does a good soldier do when he's outnumbered and outmaneuvered? He calls in reinforcements, of course. That's why Red Hat is beefing up its troops for the coming campaign, at the expense of giving up some ground today.

Firefox Making Sparks In The UK

Filed under
Moz/FF

Firefox the open source browser from Mozilla is gaining ground on Microsoft's Internet Explorer in the UK according to the latest findings from Nielsen//NetRatings. They have increased their market share by 768 percent since September 2004. Firefox is the browser of choice for 12 percent of the UK.

OpenOffice Base: Converting data and files from Access

Filed under
HowTos

OpenOffice's Base tool provides an open source alternative to proprietary Microsoft Access. But if you need to use both, it's nice to be able to move data back and forth between applications. In this tip, OpenOffice expert and instructor Solveig Haugland explains how to convert Access files to OpenOffice. She also describes a workaround for changing field orders and discusses how to group items in OpenOffice.

Pragmatic Questions about Binary-Only Drivers

Filed under
Linux

The perpetual debate over the legality, practicality, and wisdom of using, distributing, producing, and supporting binary-only drivers flared up again recently. This issue raises passionate debates, and those debates often walk the lines of a false dilemma: freedom versus pragmatism.

Quake cuts off much of Asia Internet

Filed under
Web

Internet and phone services have been disrupted across much of Asia on Wednesday after an earthquake damaged undersea cables, leaving one of the world's most tech-savvy regions in a virtual blackout.

AIX 5L LDAP user management: Active Directory client support

Filed under
News

Get an overview of the Lightweight Directory Access Protocol- (LDAP) related enhancements in the AIX 5L operating system V5.3 TL5 update. This lets clients configure and manage multiple systems with a single set of user identity configuration information, and it simplifies system administration.

Today's Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to View Hidden Files and Folders in Ubuntu File Browser

  • Change the GRUB Menu Timeout on Ubuntu
  • Show the GRUB Menu by Default on Ubuntu
  • Antivirus on Ubuntu with Avast!
  • How-to get your removable device mounted under an explicit and persistent name
  • Using the Root Account on Debian
  • Creating Filesystems in Linux

  • Rebuilding the Directory for TexInfo
  • Using Gnonlin with GStreamer and Python

  • Configure Wireless From The Command Line

Ubuntu Edgy Eft

Filed under
Ubuntu

Over the Christmas period I installed Ubuntu 5.10 (Edgy Eft) on my MacBook under Parallels, and I have to say that it’s the most likeable Linux distribution I’ve tried so far.

The Ultimate Distro

Filed under
Linux

The name of Gaël Duval's new distro, Ulteo, with its hint of the word "ultimate", smacks of a certain ambition. But Duval probably means it in the sense that it is the last distribution you will ever need to install, because thereafter it will "self-upgrade automatically," as the announcement of the alpha release put it. Ease-of-use has been a constant theme in Duval's work.

Ubuntu 6.10 (EdgyEft) vs. SUSE 10.1 on an HP Pavilion dv2000

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

Lee commented that the HP Pavilion dv2000 is well supported by Ubuntu/Kubuntu Linux 6.10 (aka EdgyEft). In particular, he mentioned that sound worked, and the extra row of blue-lit multimedia buttons at the top works. That sounded very interesting, so I decided to have a try. I use Gnome, not KDE, as my desktop, so I chose to look at Ubuntu, not Kubuntu (which Lee uses).

Finally user-friendly virtualization for Linux

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

The upcoming 2.6.20 Linux kernel is bringing a nice virtualization framework for all virtualization fans out there. It's called KVM, short for Kernel-based Virtual Machine. This article tries to explain how it all works, in theory and practice, together with some simple benchmarks.

Linux - Room for Improvement

Filed under
Linux

This month's column was supposed to be a look at openSUSE 10.2. Here's what I have to report thus far: openSUSE 10.2 is the only distribution that has stubbornly refused to install on my current test machine, an older Dell Dimension 8100 desktop. But one obstacle has led to another, and so far I'm nowhere near the finish line. Here's my current wish list.

Editing Debian alternatives graphically with galternatives

Filed under
HowTos

Have you ever been tinkering under the hood only to discover later that you blew up one of your defaults? Say your default web-browser, so that when you click a link from email it opens Firefox instead of Konqueror or vice-versa. Well I know I have. Here we'll look at how to fix this, graphically.

Mark Shuttleworth: Plan, execute, DELIVER

Filed under
Ubuntu

We are a somewhat chaotic crowd, the software libre army. Thousands of projects (hundreds of thousands, if you consider Sourceforge as a reference point). Hundreds of thousands of contributing developers from virtually every country and timezone. We are a very loosely coupled bunch.

Gameforge get rights for Saga of Ryzom

Filed under
Gaming

Mediabiz reports that the German publisher Gameforge got all rights for Saga of Ryzom from the French game developer Nevrax. Nevrax will be merged with the new founded Gameforge SARL located in Paris.

Google Toolbar 3.0 beta improves browsing experience

Filed under
Software

The Google Toolbar 3 (GT3) beta for Firefox, released earlier this month, includes a slew of new features, including bookmarks, integration with Google Apps, and customizable buttons. I tested the toolbar with Firefox 2.0 and Flock 0.7.9. Once I had it installed, I signed out of Google services and signed in using the Google Toolbar sign-in feature

Why Microsoft/Novell is good for Linux

Filed under
SUSE

Being aware, as I am, of Microsoft's monopolisation endeavours, coupled with working in a Linux world inherently mistrustful of the software giant, it may seem strange that I believe the Microsoft/Novell agreement will be great for Linux. But I do. Why?

Display top CPU processes Using htop

Filed under
HowTos

htop is a very competent interactive process viewer for the shell, providing all the functionality - and more - that the top utility does, in an easier and more intuitive way. htop provides easy-to-use menus for most operations and also has support for using a mouse.

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More in Tux Machines

Avidemux 2.6.13 Open-Source Video Editor Gets AAC/ADTS Import and Export

The developers of the Avidemux open-source and cross-platform video editor software have announced a new maintenance update in the 2.6 series, bringing multiple improvements, bug fixes, and a handful of new features. Read more

5 Best Linux Distros for Security

Security is nothing new to Linux distributions. Linux distros have always emphasized security and related matters like firewalls, penetration testing, anonymity, and privacy. So it is hardly surprising that security conscious distributions are common place. For instance, Distrowatch lists sixteen distros that specialize in firewalls, and four for privacy. Most of these specialty security distributions, however, share the same drawback: they are tools for experts, not average users. Only recently have security distributions tried to make security features generally accessible for desktop users. Read more

Linux Foundation and Linux

  • How IoTivity and AllJoyn Could Combine
    At the Embedded Linux Conference in April, Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) Executive Director Mike Richmond concluded his keynote on the potential for interoperability between the OCF’s IoTivity IoT framework and the AllSeen Alliance’s AllJoyn spec by inviting to the stage Greg Burns, the chief architect of AllJoyn. Burns briefly shared his opinion that not only was there no major technical obstacle to combining these two major open source IoT specs, but that by taking the best of both standards, a hybrid could emerge that improves upon both. Later in the day, Burns gave a technical overview of how such a hybrid could be crafted in “Evolving a Best-of-Breed IoT Framework.” (See video below.) Burns stated in both talks that his opinions in no way reflect the official position of OCF or the AllSeen Alliance. At the time of the ELC talk in April, Burns had recently left his job as VP of Engineering at Qualcomm and Chair of the Technical Steering Committee at the AllSeen Alliance to take on the position of Chief IoT Software Technologist in the Open Source Technology Center at Intel Corp.
  • ​Linus Torvalds' love-hate relationship with the GPL
    Linux's founder appreciates what the GNU General Public License has given Linux, but he doesn't appreciate how some open-source lawyers are trying to enforce it in court.
  • Linus Torvalds reflects on 25 years of Linux
    LinuxCon North America concluded in Toronto, Canada on August 25th, the day Linux was celebrating its 25th anniversary. Linus Torvalds, the creator of Linux, and Dirk Hohndel, VP and chief of open source at VMware, sat down for a conversation at the event and reflected upon the past 25 years. Here are some of the highlights of that conversation.
  • 6 things you should know from Linux's first 25 years
    Red Hat was founded in 1993, two years after Linux was announced and the company has been one of the top contributors to Linux. There is a symbiotic relationship between the company and the project. Whitehurst pointed out that it’s hard to talk about the history of Red Hat without talking about Linux and vice versa.
  • There Is Talk Of Resuming OpenChrome VIA KMS/DRM Driver Development
    Two or so years back or so it was looking hopeful that the mainline Linux kernel would finally have a proper VIA DRM/KMS driver for the unfortunate ones still have VIA x86 hardware and using the integrated graphics. However, that work was ultimately abandoned but there is talk of it being restored.

Security News

  • New FairWare Ransomware targeting Linux Computers [Ed: probably just a side effect of keeping servers unpatched]
    A new attack called FaireWare Ransomware is targeting Linux users where the attackers hack a Linux server, delete the web folder, and then demand a ransom payment of two bitcoins to get their files back. In this attack, the attackers most likely do not encrypt the files, and if they do retain the files, probably just upload it to a server under their control.
  • How do we explain email to an "expert"?
    This has been a pretty wild week, more wild than usual I think we can all agree. The topic I found the most interesting wasn't about one of the countless 0day flaws, it was a story from Slate titled: In Praise of the Private Email Server The TL;DR says running your own email server is a great idea. Almost everyone came out proclaiming it a terrible idea. I agree it's a terrible idea, but this also got me thinking. How do you explain this to someone who doesn't really understand what's going on? There are three primary groups of people. 1) People who know they know nothing 2) People who think they're experts 3) People who are actually experts
  • Why the term “zero day” needs to be in your brand’s cybersecurity vocabulary
    Linux is “open source” which means anyone can look at the code and point out flaws. In that sense, I’d say Linus Torvalds doesn’t have to be as omniscient as Tim Cook. Linux source code isn’t hidden behind closed doors. My understanding is, all the Linux code is out there for anyone to see, naked for anyone to scrutinize, which is why certain countries feel safer using it–there’s no hidden agenda or secret “back door” lurking in the shadows. Does that mean Android phones are safer? That’s up for debate.