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Tuesday, 24 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Personal Computing on the fly bigbearomaha 20/08/2012 - 12:56pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 20/08/2012 - 1:49am
Story LanyardFS: A New Linux File-System srlinuxx 20/08/2012 - 12:30am
Story Ever Higher Levels of Abstraction - Building the Future With Chef srlinuxx 20/08/2012 - 12:29am
Story BlankOn 8 preview srlinuxx 20/08/2012 - 12:26am
Story Peppermint LINUX 3 - The mint with no holes srlinuxx 20/08/2012 - 12:25am
Story Evilot, New Puzzle/Defense Game for Linux srlinuxx 20/08/2012 - 12:23am
Story Fedora + Cinnamon - What gives? srlinuxx 1 19/08/2012 - 11:43am
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 19/08/2012 - 4:17am
Story After a while of using Ubuntu 12.04 LTS... srlinuxx 19/08/2012 - 1:03am

Linux/OSS developers: stop following and start leading

Filed under
OSS

Marc Wagner: This morning, I read a piece by my Education IT colleague, Chris Dawson, entitled Making “hamburger of Microsoft’s cash cow” and I was struck by one important observation: “Open Office needs to worry less about duplicating features of Office and more about “selling” itself as a viable piece of software in its own right. “

The Open-Source ATI R500 Driver

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: Last week the first open-source ATI R500 (Radeon X1000 series) driver had entered the world. This new driver (named the xf86-video-avivo) is very early into development and does not yet contain any 3D functionality or support for features that most end-users expect. Even with this very basic R500 driver, we couldn't help but to explore the Avivo driver for the past few days.

Linux for Newbies

Filed under
Linux

Pimp Your Linux: Are you interested in moving to Linux, but have no idea how the terminal works? Are you used to commands like “dir” in dos, but have no idea how to do them in Linux? This is a great guide to get you started with the basic commands.

Using Ubuntu: What Package Did This File Come From?

Filed under
HowTos

the How-To Geek: How many times have you noticed a file sitting in a directory and wondered… where did this file come from? Or you are trying to tell a friend how to use a utility but he doesn't have it installed, and you can't remember what package you installed to get it.

What?!?!? Linux now NEEDS Microsoft?!?!?

Filed under
Linux

Penguin Pete: Nothing's more disappointing than watching the dunce in the corner suddenly appear to be on the verge of getting his first clue, only to get distracted and go back to rooting in his nostril at the last second. Groans all around! Well, that zany SJVN is at it again.

US Department of Defense: We love open source lots and lots

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Dave, who was clearly being held back by me over at Open Sources, the Department of Defense's latest Software Tech News, and highlights some interesting factoids (though he fails to read pages 37-38, which focus on Alfresco Wink:

Suse updates put Linux and Windows side by side

Filed under
SUSE

the inquirer: NOVELL HAS FINALLY introduced Service Pack 1 for Suse Linux Enterprise Server 10, delivering improved virtualisation and quad-core support, it said.

Barloworld builds on open source, Drupal

Filed under
Drupal

tectonic: Automotive engineers Barloworld CVT Technologies have set up on online presence using open source software and the Drupal content management system.

Also: The World Bank goes open-source

Google Killing Microsoft?

Filed under
Google

Blog of Gentoo: I just read a digg story, titled "The Google Product That Could Kill Microsoft". So, here I am, thinking about it bit more. I will go over this in a little more detail:

Also: The Gears that could ‘augur the death of Microsoft’

Microphones & Skype on Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

geeky bits: Today I installed Skype in Ubuntu 7.04. There can be a number of problems running Skype in Ubuntu. Yet my biggest concern was getting my microphone working.

Splitting Apache Logs With vlogger

Filed under
HowTos

Vlogger is a little tool with which you can write Apache logs broken down by virtual hosts and days.

Dual Monitors With Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

lockergnome blogs: Over and over, I hear people asking me “how do I get dual monitors working in Ubuntu“. Well today, I will show you (note the video) how to make this easy with a fairly modern NVIDIA card, two flat screen LCDs (one DVI, the other VGA) and a little understanding how getting two monitors working in Ubuntu Linux is a snap, once you understand the basics.

Visuwords: WordNet goes graphical

Filed under
Software

linux.com: WordNet is one of the best English language references available, but its command-line and rather primitive graphical interfaces don't really do it justice. WordNet would greatly benefit from a graphical front-end similar to Visual Thesaurus that allows you to view and explore the connections between different words. Fortunately, there is a tool that does exactly that.

Blocking ad servers with dnsmasq

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: I was chatting with a colleague over IRC on Tuesday and he was complaining about the new update for Bind9 that broke his automatic blocking of ad servers. Naturally I was curious and asked him what he was talking about..

Torvalds doesn’t live in Indiana

Paul Murphy: The trouble with the worker’s paradise idea is that it takes a dictator to make it happen - meaning that the happier the workers and useful idiots proclaim themselves, the worse off they are likely to actually be.

24-hour test drive: PC-BSD

Filed under
BSD

arstechnica: PC-BSD is not a Linux distribution, but rather what could be considered among the first major FreeBSD-based distributions to live outside of the official FreeBSD. Like most distributions, it has implemented certain features in a way that attempts to distinguish it from the competition, and I will focus mostly on these differences.

Linux gaming

Filed under
Gaming

kahvipapu: Linux might not have as much games as Windows (or game consoles) but people enjoying this wonderful open source operating system can have fun with games too, as there are a lot of free games for Linux available, even some huge commercial ones. So what’s the state of Linux gaming?

Green Linux to attack power consumption

Filed under
Linux

vnunet.com: The Linux Foundation has formed a "Green Linux" initiative that will focus on reducing the open source operating system's power consumption.

Also: No politics please, we’re Linux

Quake 4 v1.4.2

Filed under
Gaming

linuxgames: id Software has made the 1.4.2 Point Release for Quake 4 available. Changes include: Refined hitboxes, Optimized sound and network code, Configurable fps caps, & Weapon balancing.

Linux printing steps toward simplicity

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: The Linux Foundation last week announced the free availability of the Linux Standard Base Driver Development Kit for print drivers. The DDK provides the tools and resources for printing manufacturers to easily support all Linux distributions with one driver package, greatly reducing the time and effort needed to support Linux, a foundation spokesperson said.

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More in Tux Machines

Red Hat's Survey in India

From Raspberry Pi to Supercomputers to the Cloud: The Linux Operating System

Linux is widely used in corporations now as the basis for everything from file servers to web servers to network security servers. The no-cost as well as commercial availability of distributions makes it an obvious choice in many scenarios. Distributions of Linux now power machines as small as the tiny Raspberry Pi to the largest supercomputers in the world. There is a wide variety of minimal and security hardened distributions, some of them designed for GPU workloads. Read more

IBM’s Systems With GNU/Linux

  • IBM Gives Power Systems Rebates For Linux Workloads
    Big Blue has made no secret whatsoever that it wants to ride the Linux wave up with the Power Systems platform, and its marketeers are doing what they can to sweeten the hardware deals as best they can without adversely affecting the top and bottom line at IBM in general and the Power Systems division in particular to help that Linux cause along.
  • Drilling Down Into IBM’s System Group
    The most obvious thing is that IBM’s revenues and profits continue to shrink, but the downside is getting smaller and smaller, and we think that IBM’s core systems business will start to level out this year and maybe even grow by the third or fourth quarter, depending on when Power9-based Power Systems and z14-based System z mainframes hit the market. In the final period of 2016, IBM’s overall revenues were $21.77 billion, down 1.1 percent from a year ago, and net income rose by nearly a point to $4.5 billion. This is sure a lot better than a year ago, when IBM’s revenues fell by 8.4 percent to $22 billion and its net income fell by 18.6 percent to $4.46 billion. For the full 2016 year, IBM’s revenues were off 2.1 percent to $79.85 billion, but its “real” systems business, which includes servers, storage, switching, systems software, databases, transaction monitors, and tech support and financing for its own iron, fell by 8.3 percent to $26.1 billion. (That’s our estimate; IBM does not break out sales this way, but we have some pretty good guesses on how it all breaks down.)

Security News

  • DB Ransom Attacks Spread to CouchDB and Hadoop [Ed: Get sysadmins who know what they are doing, as misconfigurations are expensive]
  • Security advisories for Monday
  • Return on Risk Investment
  • Widely used WebEx plugin for Chrome will execute attack code—patch now!
    The Chrome browser extension for Cisco Systems WebEx communications and collaboration service was just updated to fix a vulnerability that leaves all 20 million users susceptible to drive-by attacks that can be carried out by just about any website they visit.
  • DDoS attacks larger, more frequent and complex says Arbor
    Distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks are becoming more frequent and complex, forcing businesses to deploy purpose-built DDoS protection solutions, according to a new infrastructure security report which warns that the threat landscape has been transformed by the emergence of Internet of Things (IoT) botnets. The annual worldwide infrastructure security report from Arbor Networks - the security division of NETSCOUT - reveals that the largest distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attack reported in 2016 was 800 Gbps, a 60% increase over 2015’s largest attack of 500 Gbps.