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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 28 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 06/02/2013 - 6:07pm
Story Ubuntu Weekly Newsletter Issue 302 srlinuxx 06/02/2013 - 1:47am
Story Krita 2.6 Released srlinuxx 06/02/2013 - 1:44am
Story Why I said goodbye to the Gnome Desktop srlinuxx 06/02/2013 - 1:40am
Story Why the Linux Desktop Needs More Usability Testing srlinuxx 05/02/2013 - 10:53pm
Story Linux Netbooks: Hiding in Plain Sight srlinuxx 05/02/2013 - 8:41pm
Story Raspberry Pi Model A released one year later srlinuxx 05/02/2013 - 7:44pm
Story Jonathan Blow criticises Linux dev tools srlinuxx 05/02/2013 - 7:41pm
Story UEFI strikes again srlinuxx 05/02/2013 - 7:34pm
Story 75 Top Open Source Tools for Protecting Your Privacy srlinuxx 05/02/2013 - 7:31pm

Screenshots Of DSL-4.0 Alpha 1

Filed under
Linux

linuxseeker: The developmental release of the beautifully "near-microscopic" Damn Small Linux 4.0 Alpha1 has been released on 17 July 2007. This is what Damn Small Linux's fans have been really longing for. Happy, no. Euphoric, yes!

CheckGmail - a Gmail notifier for Linux

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: To be fair to them, Google are now producing quite a few desktop applications for Linux now. However, we don’t yet have a Gmail Notifier application which runs in the background and shows you when you have new email in your Gmail inbox.

Why Linux has failed to become a viable desktop OS

Filed under
Linux

thoughtsabouttechnology: Linux has been an OS since 1991. It has been adopted by many web hosting providers and is a heavily used server platform. So, why can't Linux be a desktop OS? Simply put, because it doesn't have the features of a modern day desktop OS.

How-To: Install Ubuntu on LVM partitions.

Filed under
HowTos

debuntu.org: LVM (Logical Volume Manager) is a great piece of software which allow you to deal with Logical Volumes. Using LVM along with ext3 filesystem, you are allowed to extend the size of your logical drives which is pretty handy when running out of space.

Cries for help go out as open source mogul's radar breaks

Filed under
OSS

the register: How appropriate that we caught Chairman Tim O'Reilly ogling Portland's tram schedule just a few minutes before the Pirate Party's founder Rickard Falkvinge took the stage at O'Reilly's own conference. Chairman Tim plotted his escape from OSCON, as Falkvinge prepared to talk to the people about things that matter.

Thunderbird -- Why Change Things?

Filed under
Moz/FF

mitchell's blog: One large them of responses to the Thunderbird post is the question: Why can't Thunderbird and Firefox both prosper in the same development organization? Since there is money, what's the problem?

Linux: Documenting Memory Hotplug

Filed under
Linux

kerneltrap: Yasunori Goto posted some documentation for memory hotplugging which can be used to increase or decrease the amount of memory available to a live kernel. The documentation explains that this functionality is useful for virtualization and capacity on demand solutions, as well as for physically adding and removing RAM from NUMA-nodes.

Solaris Express SXCE Build 69 Screenshots

Filed under
OS

phoronix: What does Solaris look like? It's actually a question we've been asked quite a bit since beginning to cover Solaris at Phoronix earlier this year. When using the GNOME desktop, it doesn't look much different from Linux.

Grandpa Gets a Dell with Ubuntu Linux Preinstalled

Filed under
Ubuntu

Groklaw: On June 30, 2007, my wife and I decided to upgrade my life by replacing my home-made‚ Pentium III computer with a Dell Inspiron 530N with Ubuntu Linux. This would be the first time in almost 10 years that I had purchased a name brand computer. The machine was shipped on July 18, 2007.

A Linux Experience

Filed under
Ubuntu

5thwind: Back in January, I decided to download a live CD of Ubuntu Linux to try out. I was surprised to find that everything worked…just like that. The more I fooled around with it, the more it intrigued me.

MOC Audio Player — advanced tricks

Filed under
Software

polishlinux: The program MOC was reviewed in recent article called MOC — Console Audio Player for Linux. It was written by Roman Tworkowski. Even though we live in the times of cute graphical interfaces e.g. Compiz, KDE, etc. I consider the MOC player to be a better solution for some users (including myself) than the very popular applications Xmms or Amarok, and the other visually appealing players. Why do I think so?

A computer in every pot

Filed under
OLPC

economist.com: This week sees the realisation of Mr Negroponte’s five-year dream. After field testing in Nigeria and Brazil, the OLPC project’s first model, a rugged little green laptop called the XO that can run on batteries, solar power, a miniature windmill or hand- or foot-crank, goes into mass production. Schoolchildren in developing countries will start receiving the remarkable computer from October onwards.

Dissecting The ATI/AMD Linux Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: If you have been reading our ATI/AMD Linux display driver reviews for some time, you will know that there are periods where it doesn't look like the fglrx driver is actively being worked on, but in fact changes are being made "under the hood". We have decided to dissect the last 19 months of driver releases from ATI/AMD to expose some interesting facts and what should be coming in the future.

Fedora 7 installation screenshots

Filed under
Linux

All about Linux: As you know, the Fedora team has released the latest offering of Fedora which is Fedora 7. It has been released as a liveCD as well as in the DVD format. These are the steps you go through while installing Fedora 7 using the liveCD installer.

GNU/Linux Partitioning: A Myth

Filed under
HowTos

Linux Evangelist: It’s annoying to read so much about partitioning under GNU/Linux being hard. Though I have installed various distributions (and still installing) for about 50 times in a year (without exaggeration) for myself, my friends and known people; this claim about “Partitioning under GNU/Linux is hard” is really baseless.

Linux: Linus On CFS vs SD

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "People who think SD was 'perfect' were simply ignoring reality," Linus Torvalds began in a succicnt explanation as to why he chose the CFS scheduler written by Ingo Molnar instead of the SD scheduler written by Con Kolivas.

Your Choices with Gentoo

Filed under
Gentoo

Daniel Robbins: There is a large interest among the Gentoo and larger Linux user community for me to come back as Chief Architect. However, there's lots of reasons why trying to jump back into the Chief Architect role this isn't the right thing to do. The solution, I think, is to look for positive ways to improve the Gentoo community.

People Behind KDE: Jos Poortvliet

Filed under
KDE

For the next interview in the People Behind KDE series, we travel to the Netherlands to meet a KDE promoter and meeting organiser, someone who helps the international community to experience KDE events, even if they were not in attendance - tonight's star of People Behind KDE is Jos Poortvliet.

Weekly tip: how to get the best out of the history command in GNU/Linux

Filed under
HowTos

FreeSoftware Mag: Anybody who has used the command line extensively to navigate, understand and configure GNU/Linux will know that in the course of a few months’ work it is possible to build up an extensive history of used commands. This necessitates some pro-active management to get the best out of it. Here are some tips to make the most of the history command.

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More in Tux Machines

Leftovers: Software

  • Linux Command Line Browser To Surf Internet
    Links is an open source text and graphical web browser with a pull-down menu system. It renders complex pages, has partial HTML 4.0 support (including tables and frames and support for multiple characters sets such as UTF-8), supports color and monochrome terminals and allows horizontal scrolling. It’s very useful for low resources computers because day by day the web pages are bigger and heavier. If your computer doesn’t have a suitable performance you’ll have some mistakes while you’re surfing. So, Links is much faster than any common web browser (with GUI) because it doesn’t load all the content of a website, for example, videos, flash, etc.
  • Stacer – The Linux System Optimizer You’ve Been Waiting For
    System optimizer apps are quite the thing on platforms such as Windows and Android. Their usefulness, however, is debatable considering how notorious they are when it comes to using system resources. On the Linux platform, however, we can almost always find the applications, a developer puts their time in developing to be mostly useful. Stacer is one such app created to better optimized your Linux PC in the sense that it packs quite the list of features you’d normally expect from an optimizer and more to give your system a refresh whenever you feel the need.
  • Ulauncher – A Lightweight Application Launcher for Linux
    Each Desktop environment has the own launcher and doing their job nicely but it take a while to launch the application whenever we are searching. Ulauncher is a lightweight application launcher that loads instant search results, usese low resources, and remembers your previous choices and automatically selects the best option for you. It’s written in Python and uses GTK as a GUI toolkit. When you are typing wrong application name, after few words or spelling, it will figure out what you meant. Use Ulauncher to open your files and directories faster with fuzzy search. Type ~ or / to start browsing. Press Alt+Enter to access the alt menu.

Linux Kernel and Graphics

Security News

  • Windows 10 least secure of Windows versions: study
    Windows 10 was the least secure of of current Windows versions in 2016, with 46% more vulnerabilities than either Windows 8 or 8.1, according to an analysis of Microsoft's own security bulletins in 2016. Security firm Avecto said its research, titled "2016 Microsoft Vulnerabilities Study: Mitigating risk by removing user privileges", had also found that a vast majority of vulnerabilities found in Microsoft products could be mitigated by removing admin rights. The research found that, despite its claims to being the "most secure" of Microsoft's operating systems, Windows 10 had 395 vulnerabilities in 2016, while Windows 8 and 8.1 each had 265. The research also found that while 530 Microsoft vulnerabilities were reported — marginally up from the 524 reported in 2015 — and 189 given a critical rating, 94% could be mitigated by removing admin rights. This was up from 85% in 2015.
  • Windows 10 Creators Update can block Win32 apps if they’re not from the Store [Ed: By Microsoft Peter. People who put Vista 10 on a PC totally lose control of that PC; remember, the OS itself is malware, as per textbook definitions. With DRM and other antifeatures expect copyright enforcement on the desktop soon.]
    The latest Windows 10 Insider Preview build doesn't add much in the way of features—it's mostly just bug fixes—but one small new feature has been spotted, and it could be contentious. Vitor Mikaelson noticed that the latest build lets you restrict the installation of applications built using the Win32 API.
  • Router assimilated into the Borg, sends 3TB in 24 hours
    "Well, f**k." Harsh language was appropriate under the circumstances. My router had just been hacked. Setting up a reliable home network has always been a challenge for me. I live in a cramped three-story house, and I don't like running cables. So my router's position is determined by the fiber modem in a corner on the bottom floor. Not long after we moved in, I realized that our old Airport Extreme was not delivering much signal to the attic, where two game-obsessed occupants fought for bandwidth. I tried all sorts of things. I extended the network. I used Ethernet-over-powerline connectors to deliver network access. I made a mystic circle and danced naked under the full moon. We lost neighbors, but we didn't gain a signal.
  • Purism's Librem 13 Coreboot Port Now "100%" Complete
    According to Purism's Youness Alaoui, their Coreboot port to the Librem 13 v1 laptop is now considered complete. The Librem 13 was long talked about having Coreboot over a proprietary BIOS while the initial models still had shipped with the conventional BIOS. Finally in 2017, they have now Coreboot at what they consider to be 100% complete for this Linux-friendly laptop.
  • The Librem 13 v1 coreboot port is now complete
    Here are the news you’ve been waiting for: the coreboot port for the Librem 13 v1 is 100% done! I fixed all of the remaining issues, it is now fully working and is stable, ready for others to enjoy. I fixed the instability problem with the M.2 SATA port, finished running all the tests to ensure coreboot is working correctly, fixed the headphone jack that was not working, made the boot prettier, and started investigating the Intel Management Engine issue.
  • Linux Update Fixes 11-Year-Old Flaw
    Andrey Konovalov, a security researcher at Google, found a use-after-free hole within Linux, CSO Online reported. This particular flaw is of interest because it appears to be situational. It only showed up in kernels built with a certain configuration option — CONFIG_IP_DCCP — enabled.

Kerala saves Rs 300 cr as schools switch to open software

The Kerala government has made a saving of Rs 300 crore through introduction and adoption of Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) in the school education sector, said a state government official on Sunday. IT became a compulsory subject in Kerala schools from 2003, but it was in 2005 only that FOSS was introduced in a phased manner and started to replace proprietary software. The decision made by the curriculum committee to implement it in the higher secondary sector has also been completed now. Read more