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Friday, 24 Jun 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Myah OS 2.2 SE Released

Filed under
Linux

Myah OS 2.2 is available for download. 2.2 is running on the very
latest Slackware 11 packages with the exception of the KDE packages.

Debian Linux project group to pay developers

Filed under
Linux

A group of senior developers from the Debian GNU/Linux project have decided to raise funds to pay volunteers who work on the project in order that releases can be made more frequently.

Upgrade Sarge to Etch

Filed under
HowTos

Today i have tried to upgrade my debian sarge (stable) to Etch(testing) and it went on very well without any problem and it is very simple to upgrade from debian sarge to debian etch.

Helicopter Simulator: Really Real-time Linux

Filed under
Misc

Every now and then, you stumble across a software system that you never think about. Such is the case with a Linux-powered helicopter simulator being developed by Mitsubishi Heavy Industries. And no, you can't run it on your PlayStation 2.

A look at MythTV 0.20

Filed under
Software

MythTV is a Linux based, multimedia software that allows you to view & record TV shows to your hard drive in the manner of Tivo, Windows Media Center and Beyond TV. I installed the latest version to see if it was really good as it looked to be. Version 0.20 does feature some extensive new features and improvements.

Fixing No space left on device error in Ubuntu Linux

Filed under
HowTos

I’m using Ubuntu as my main OS in both my desktop and laptop. I was getting the following error when I tried to login to Ubuntu couple of days back: our session lasted less than 10 seconds blah blah blah……

Who's Hot? Who's Not?

Filed under
Misc

First, you tell me the YouTube’s Lonelygirl15 was an actor. Next, we have Microsoft talking about some kind of “open source” model and finally, Hewlett-Packard has board room spies. The next ting you will tell me is something really goofy; like Pluto isn’t a planet anymore.

Countdown to Final: Mandriva 2007 RC2

Filed under
MDV
Reviews
-s

Even though Mandriva 2007 Final is due out at about any time, RC2 was released Sunday and most of the news sites carried the news on Monday. I decided I'd go ahead and test rc2 since I'd not seen Mandriva since beta3. At that time things were really beginning to come together for Mandriva developers and some vast improvements were found. Were they able to maintain their upward curve or did this release fail to impress?

Top 10 Free Linux Games

Filed under
Reviews
Gaming

If you use Linux as your primary OS, then you already understand why it is so great. But, do you game on it? Ever try to convert your Windows friends to Linux? More times than not, the dreaded first question is, "Can I game on it?" If you think that there are no great games for Linux, think again! We are taking a look at 10 of some of the most popular Linux games... that just so happen to be completely free!

My Gentoo odyssey

Filed under
Gentoo

Gentoo is a Linux distribution unlike any other I have used, not just in terms of how it does things, but in the philosophy which drives its design. Gentoo doesn't ask what it can do to make things easier, it asks you exactly what it is that you want it to do, and then does precisely and only that. I gave Gentoo a good try, but I won't be sticking with it. Why not? I'm glad you asked.

OSDL patent project 'worse than nothing'

Filed under
OSS

Analysis: A project to fight low-quality software patents in the US could make the legal terrain more difficult for open source, according to FSF founder Richard Stallman

The Text Pistols

Filed under
Linux

A growing number of renegade geeks are choosing to shun the full-blown GUI in favour of apps such as GNU screen, GNU Emacs and in rare instances a tiny window manager. Martin Howse checks into the world of the stripped down interface.

Microsoft May Finger EU For New Vista Delay

Filed under
Microsoft

Microsoft may be setting up the European Union to take the rap for another delay in Windows Vista, a research firm said Monday.

Microsoft's Masterpiece of FUD

Filed under
Microsoft

I've been tracking the evolution of Microsoft FUD for nearly 10 years now, and wrote a short history of the subject a few months back. But even I was impressed when I came across Microsoft's latest effort in this department: it's truly a masterpiece of its kind.

Taking the Linux Plunge

Filed under
Linux

When Microsoft announced the end of support for Windows 98 and Millennium Edition on June 30th, there was a lot of talk of these users migrating over to Linux Desktops. According to OneStat.com, this is approximately 4% of the total PCs in the world. With Linux clocking in at only 0.4%, this means for every ten PCs, only one has Linux installed.

Attack of the SVGs! Xara Extreme for Linux

Filed under
HowTos

Going on the advice of Pmouse, I downloaded Xara Extreme this morning. Slick is the word that comes to mind. The install on Ubuntu is not hard at all. First, you’ll want to download the package. Once you’ve gotten it on your computer, open up a terminal session.

Alacarte: GNOME's long overdue menu editor

Filed under
Software

The Alacarte menu editor is one of the major additions in GNOME 2.16. Already previously available in Ubuntu and other distributions, Alacarte adds a degree of customization that has been generally lacking since GNOME dropped its previous menu editor more than five years ago during the early 2.x releases.

KDE Thanks Rob Levin

Filed under
KDE

We knew him as lilo. He was the founder of the Freenode IRC network, a place where many open source projects established a real-time meeting ground. Freenode is where we work, play, and share. It is where many a small idea has grown into a large project.

Copyright, bad faith, and software licensing

Filed under
OSS

Robin Miller recently published a story on Newsforge about "Stan"[1], as an example of a situation that demonstrates proprietary software is a danger to business continuity. I found this story interesting since I think Mr. Miller came close to correctly identifying a core issue.

LinuxWorld showcases business cases for Linux

Filed under
Linux

With Linux making deeper inroads into corporate data centres, the recent LinuxWorld Conference & Expo in San Francisco gave attendees some first-hand information about how open source is maturing to handle more critical business workloads.

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More in Tux Machines

OSS in the Back End

  • Open Source NFV Part Four: Open Source MANO
    Defined in ETSI ISG NFV architecture, MANO (Management and Network Orchestration) is a layer — a combination of multiple functional entities — that manages and orchestrates the cloud infrastructure, resources and services. It is comprised of, mainly, three different entities — NFV Orchestrator, VNF Manager and Virtual Infrastructure Manager (VIM). The figure below highlights the MANO part of the ETSI NFV architecture.
  • After the hype: Where containers make sense for IT organizations
    Container software and its related technologies are on fire, winning the hearts and minds of thousands of developers and catching the attention of hundreds of enterprises, as evidenced by the huge number of attendees at this week’s DockerCon 2016 event. The big tech companies are going all in. Google, IBM, Microsoft and many others were out in full force at DockerCon, scrambling to demonstrate how they’re investing in and supporting containers. Recent surveys indicate that container adoption is surging, with legions of users reporting they’re ready to take the next step and move from testing to production. Such is the popularity of containers that SiliconANGLE founder and theCUBE host John Furrier was prompted to proclaim that, thanks to containers, “DevOps is now mainstream.” That will change the game for those who invest in containers while causing “a world of hurt” for those who have yet to adapt, Furrier said.
  • Is Apstra SDN? Same idea, different angle
    The company’s product, called Apstra Operating System (AOS), takes policies based on the enterprise’s intent and automatically translates them into settings on network devices from multiple vendors. When the IT department wants to add a new component to the data center, AOS is designed to figure out what needed changes would flow from that addition and carry them out. The distributed OS is vendor-agnostic. It will work with devices from Cisco Systems, Hewlett Packard Enterprise, Juniper Networks, Cumulus Networks, the Open Compute Project and others.
  • MapR Launches New Partner Program for Open Source Data Analytics
    Converged data vendor MapR has launched a new global partner program for resellers and distributors to leverage the company's integrated data storage, processing and analytics platform.
  • A Seamless Monitoring System for Apache Mesos Clusters
  • All Marathons Need a Runner. Introducing Pheidippides
    Activision Publishing, a computer games publisher, uses a Mesos-based platform to manage vast quantities of data collected from players to automate much of the gameplay behavior. To address a critical configuration management problem, James Humphrey and John Dennison built a rather elegant solution that puts all configurations in a single place, and named it Pheidippides.
  • New Tools and Techniques for Managing and Monitoring Mesos
    The platform includes a large number of tools including Logstash, Elasticsearch, InfluxDB, and Kibana.
  • BlueData Can Run Hadoop on AWS, Leave Data on Premises
    We've been watching the Big Data space pick up momentum this year, and Big Data as a Service is one of the most interesting new branches of this trend to follow. In a new development in this space, BlueData, provider of a leading Big-Data-as-a-Service software platform, has announced that the enterprise edition of its BlueData EPIC software will run on Amazon Web Services (AWS) and other public clouds. Essentially, users can now run their cloud and computing applications and services in an Amazon Web Services (AWS) instance while keeping data on-premises, which is required for some companies in the European Union.

today's howtos

Industrial SBC builds on Raspberry Pi Compute Module

On Kickstarter, a “MyPi” industrial SBC using the RPi Compute Module offers a mini-PCIe slot, serial port, wide-range power, and modular expansion. You might wonder why in 2016 someone would introduce a sandwich-style single board computer built around the aging, ARM11 based COM version of the original Raspberry Pi, the Raspberry Pi Compute Module. First off, there are still plenty of industrial applications that don’t need much CPU horsepower, and second, the Compute Module is still the only COM based on Raspberry Pi hardware, although the cheaper, somewhat COM-like Raspberry Pi Zero, which has the same 700MHz processor, comes close. Read more

DAISY: A Linux-compatible text format for the visually impaired

If you're blind or visually impaired like I am, you usually require various levels of hardware or software to do things that people who can see take for granted. One among these is specialized formats for reading print books: Braille (if you know how to read it) or specialized text formats such as DAISY. Read more