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Thursday, 19 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Review: OnePlus One smartphone sb56637 04/01/2015 - 11:30pm
Story 3 REASONS WHY OPEN SOURCE MEANS BETTER SECURITY Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 9:52pm
Story An Everyday Linux User Review Of Xubuntu 14.10 Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 9:34pm
Story GNU Chess release 6.2.0 Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 9:26pm
Story Galaxy S5 Android 5.0 Lollipop Update Making Progress Rianne Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 8:58pm
Story today's leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 8:12pm
Story Next-Generation PHP 7.0 Is Running Well But Will It Catch Up To HHVM? Roy Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 11:35am
Story Atom PC – Future PC Roy Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 11:20am
Story Make Your elementary OS Look like Mac OS X Yosemite with Just a Theme Roy Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 10:59am
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 04/01/2015 - 10:58am

From XMMS to Amarok

Filed under
Software

raiden.net: As odd as it sounds, I never would have expected myself to be making the jump to Amarok. For years and years I've been a big XMMS fan, mostly because of it's simple and easy to use interface. But with the advent of XMMS2, the player I loved has gone the way of the dodo.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • KDE 4.1 and the WoW

  • Taking Ubuntu Ibex on vacation
  • An idiot's view of open source
  • BMW wants to pimp your ride with open source
  • How to get VC investment for your open source business
  • Life in the trenches: an OpenSSH developer speaks
  • A pile of stable kernel updates
  • Hidden Linux : Spot the diff
  • Split mp3 Files With mp3splt
  • All MySQL's children
  • United Nations using Drupal
  • Wise and True Sayings About Computers
  • Open-Source Database Adoption May Be Linked to Economy
  • More DRM Patches For Linux 2.6.28 Kernel
  • Gentoo-sources 2.6.27-r1 release

Kubuntu 8.10 'Intrepid Ibex' Beta Screenshots Tour

Filed under
Ubuntu

tuxarena.blogspot: In less than a week the new Ubuntu 8.10 Intrepid Ibex should be out. I took these screenshots using a Kubuntu Intrepid Beta installation after performing a full dist-upgrade, at 1280x1024, with the nVIDIA 173 driver installed.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Setting up dual monitors system-wide with XRandR on Debian Lenny

  • 10 Awk Tips, Tricks and Pitfalls
  • How to use the dig command
  • Howto: pre-compile KHelpCenter index
  • Google Gadgets for Linux in Debian and Ubuntu
  • Installing a script in GIMP
  • A New Refreshing Look for Ubuntu
  • Quickly move an executable between systems with ELF Statifier
  • Shut down idle computers on your network automatically

KDE4 apps: Gwenview

Filed under
Software

polishlinux.org: Gwenview is a very useful image viewer for KDE4, also featuring printing, rotating, and mirroring. There are not too many functions and settings included so far, but a lot is scheduled to be added.

Three to-do list managers for GNU/Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Never forget an important task again with these great to-do list managers for Linux.

Icculus Ports Prey Game Client To Linux

Filed under
Gaming

phoronix.com: Ryan Gordon has just released the Prey client for Linux. Prey is a game developed by Human Head Studios and first released for the Windows platform in 2006. This first-person shooter uses a heavily-modified version of the id Tech 4 engine.

New Xfce beta focuses on usability

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Xfce version 4.6 is shaping up to be more significant than most minor releases. Besides fixes and enhancements that are invisible to the casual user, the first revision in almost two years of GNU/Linux's third most popular desktop includes numerous changes to applications such as the calendar, mixer, and logout dialog, a new configuration engine, and usability changes to the desktop.

Everything You Wanted To know About Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

linuxhaxor.net: The next version of Ubuntu 8.10 (Intrepid Ibex) is scheduled to be released on OCT 30th. Ubuntu, the only second Linux distro to have a six month release cycle, is the most popular Desktop Linux distribution of all time, with a market share of 30% among all Linux distributions.

Are vendors vital to open source?

Filed under
OSS

Seven Ways that GNU/Linux Tops Vista

Filed under
Linux

earthweb.com: These days, anyone who believes that they need a command line to work in GNU/Linux is in for a surprise. In fact, in many ways, GNU/Linux is more than a match for Windows Vista. In some cases, Vista can equal GNU/Linux if you are willing to delve deeply into the registry or install additional software, but here are seven ways that GNU/Linux outperforms Vista on first boot.

Dell's Mario joins Ubuntu Core-Dev team

Filed under
Ubuntu

direct2dell.com: Lots of folks within Dell are committed to Linux initiatives. Ubuntu is a good example. That's why I wanted to take a few minutes to congratulate Dell's own Mario Limonciello for being named to the Ubuntu Core Development Team.

*All* Russian Schools to Use Free Software

Filed under
OSS

computerworlduk.com: I've often lamented how few schools in the UK use free software, and how difficult it is to break the lock that Microsoft has on the entire educational system. The pathetic state here is highlighted by contrast with Russia, which is making amazing strides in rolling out open source to schools.

What Is So Good About Linux?

Filed under
Linux

computingtech.blogspot: In recent years Linux has emerged as a powerful and innovative UNIX work-alike. Using the Internet, today’s skilled programmers submit additions and improvements to the operating system to Linus Torvalds, GNU, or one of the other authors of Linux.

Linux Mint Fluxbox Leaves A Very Pleasant Taste

Filed under
Linux

reddevil62-techhead.blogspot: DO you remember After Eight mints? When Linux Mint 5 Fluxbox CE appeared on the Distrowatch new releases list I experienced the same sense of excitement and anticipation that little boy felt on a cold Lancastrian Christmas morning, way back in the mists of time.

First look: OpenSUSE 11.1 beta 3 very promising

Filed under
SUSE

arstechnica.com: OpenSUSE 11.1 beta 3 offers some nice improvements and comes with the latest versions of popular open source software programs.

On the wife’s computer - Ubuntu does it again

Filed under
Ubuntu

education.zdnet: As you probably remember, an increasingly kludgy Vista Home Premium install finally irritated us enough that I installed OpenSUSE. The install went fine, but without a lot of fiddling, the Broadcom wireless card just wasn’t going to do its thing. Then I couldn’t resist pulling out the Ubuntu CD.

Linux Gaming Console Coming in November

ostatic.com: Envizions Computer Entertainment announced recently that the Linux-based EVO gaming console will be available for sale November 18. If anything, this release will heat up the "Linux isn't an operating system for gaming" chorus.

Is Linux really worth USD $10 billion?

Filed under
Linux

openSUSE 11.1 Beta 3 My first shot

Filed under
SUSE

benkevan.com: As you may have read, openSUSE 11.1 was realeased and was shipped with KDE 4.1.2. My installation was simple, I actually did a sudo zypper dup From openSUSE 11.0. I ran it a few times, and after a while all was updated.

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More in Tux Machines

Trisquel 9.0 Development Plans and Trisquel 8.0 Release

  • Trisquel 9.0 development plans
    Just as we release Trisquel 8.0, the development of the next version begins! Following the naming suggestions thread I've picked Etiona, which sounds good and has the fewest search results. We currently do our development in a rented dedicated server in France, and although it is functional it has many performance and setup issues. It has 32 gigs of RAM, which may sound like plenty but stays below the sweet spot where you can create big enough ramdisks to compile large packages without having to ever write to disk during the build process, greatly improving performance. It also has only 8 cores and rather slow disks. The good news is that the FSF has generously decided to host a much larger dedicated build server for us, which will allow us to scale up operations. The new machine will have fast replicated disks, lots of RAM and two 12 core CPUs. Along with renewing the hardware, we need to revamp the software build infrastructure. Currently the development server runs a GitLab instance, Jenkins and pbuilder-based build jails. This combination was a big improvement from the custom made scripts of early releases, but it has some downsides that have been removed by sbuild. Sbuild is lighter and faster and has better crash recovery and reporting.
  • Trisquel 8.0 LTS Flidas
    Trisquel 8.0, codename "Flidas" is finally here! This release will be supported with security updates until April 2021. The first thing to acknowledge is that this arrival has been severely delayed, to the point where the next upstream release (Ubuntu 18.04 LTS) will soon be published. The good news is that the development of Trisquel 9.0 will start right away, and it should come out closer to the usual release schedule of "6 months after upstream release". But this is not to say that we shouldn't be excited about Trisquel 8.0, quite the contrary! It comes with many improvements over Trisquel 7.0, and its core components (kernel, graphics drivers, web browser and e-mail client) are fully up to date and will receive continuous upgrades during Flidas' lifetime. Trisquel 8.0 has benefited from extensive testing, as many people have been using the development versions as their main operating system for some time. On top of that, the Free Software Foundation has been using it to run the Libreplanet conference since last year, and it has been powering all of its new server infrastructure as well!

today's howtos

FOSS Events in Europe: Rust, foss-north, KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018

  • Rust loves GNOME Hackfest: Day 1
    This is a report of the first day of the Rust loves GNOME Hackfest that we are having in Madrid at the moment. During the first day we had a round of introductions and starting outlining the state of the art.
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 1
    I'm in Madrid since Monday, at the third GNOME+Rust hackfest! The OpenShine folks are kindly letting us use their offices, on the seventh floor of a building by the Cuatro Caminos roundabout. I am very, very thankful that this time everyone seems to be working on developing gnome-class. It's a difficult project for me, and more brainpower is definitely welcome — all the indirection, type conversion, GObject obscurity, and procedural macro shenanigans definitely take a toll on oneself.
  • Five days left
    I use to joke that the last week before foss-north is the worst – everything is done, all that is left is the stress.
  • KubeCon + CloudnativeCon Europe 2018
    The Cloud Native Computing Foundation’s flagship conference will be taking place in Copenhagen from May 2-4. It will cover Kubernetes, Prometheus OpenTracing, Fluentd, Linkerd, gRPC, CoreDNS, and other key technologies in cloud native computing.

Programming: Taxonomy of Tech Debt, Python and More

  • A Taxonomy of Tech Debt
    Hi there. I’m Bill “LtRandolph” Clark, and I’m the engineering manager for the Champions team on LoL. I’ve worked on several different teams on League over the past years, but one focus has been consistent: I’m obsessed with tech debt. I want to find it, I want to understand it, and where possible, I want to fix it. When engineers talk about any existing piece of technology - for example League of Legends patch 8.4 - we often talk about tech debt. I define tech debt as code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Countless blog posts, articles, and definitions have been written about this scourge of software development. This post will focus on types of tech debt I’ve seen during my time working at Riot, and a model for discussing it that we’re starting to use internally. If you only take away one lesson from this article, I hope you remember the “contagion” metric discussed below.
  • 6 Python datetime libraries
    Once upon a time, one of us (Lacey) had spent more than an hour staring at the table in the Python docs that describes date and time formatting strings. I was having a hard time understanding one specific piece of the puzzle as I was trying to write the code to translate a datetime string from an API into a Python datetime object, so I asked for help.
  • Getting started with Anaconda Python for data science
  • How to install the Moodle learning management system
  • Anatomy of a JavaScript Error
  • Is DevOps compatible with part-time community teams?