Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 24 Sep 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Adullact to award open source development project Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:21pm
Story Catalyst 14.6 Beta Now Available For AMD Linux Gamers Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:18pm
Story Open-spec ARM SBC runs Debian on sub-2W Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:13pm
Story BackTrack Successor Kali Linux 1.0.7 Arrives with Linux Kernel 3.14 Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:06pm
Story XCOM: Enemy Unknown Officially Confirmed for Linux, Feral Interactive Is Porting the Game Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:05pm
Story Techtalk: learning more about Linux Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 7:01pm
Story The true value of open source is people Roy Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 6:59pm
Story Linux users rejoice, here’s Ubuntu on the Surface Pro 3 Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 6:59pm
Story When Apache Projects Die. Click. Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 6:47pm
Story Qt3D 2.0 Is A Rewrite Of Qt's 3D Support Rianne Schestowitz 27/05/2014 - 6:39pm

Multifunction copiers in a Linux network

linux.com: In many organizations, copiers get little respect. Often relegated to a break room or storage closet, they are underutilized and underappreciated, and get no attention from the IT department. Yet, multifunction copiers can play a critical role in reducing operating costs and become a hub for document processing.

libc6: nightmare or just a bad dream?

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.nixternal.com: From looking at the bug report, forum thread, mailing lists, and IRC, I think some may agree it was a nightmare. I am here to tell you that it was nothing more than a bad dream however. A bad dream?

Linux Product Insider for March 13

Filed under
Linux

linuxjournal.com: Welcome to the March 13th edition of the "Linux Product Insider", our weekly round-up of new products and services in Linux and open source. Here is what is new and interesting this week.

Wal-Mart didn’t murder Linux

Filed under
Linux

blogs.the451group: I had to chuckle at the recent headlines: ‘Wal-Mart yanks Linux,’ ‘Wal-Mart Linux experiment failed,’ ‘Wal-Mart puts lid on Linux.’ Why don’t they just come right out and say what they seem to insinuate: ‘Wal-Mart murdered Linux.’ Now, that’s not really what happened.

What if... Windows went open source?

Filed under
Microsoft

itwire.com: When Microsoft talks about open source, people in the FOSS community tend to generally take it with a pinch - or more likely a kilo - of salt. Revealing the crown jewels of its empire - the Windows source code - has never ever been canvassed.

Also: Windows 7 eyed by antitrust regulators

BuffaloLinux is a Slackware based distribution

Filed under
Linux

linuxlandit.blogspot: BuffaloLinux is a Slackware based distribution. Additionally, it supports both 'rpm' and 'deb' packages through its install and upgrade scripts ('buff', 'Buff', 'sudobuff' and 'sudoBuff').

How The GPL Can Save Your Ass

Filed under
OSS

linux-mag.com: It is time to get serious about this multi-core thing. For years, I have dreaded the day when the computing world hits the parallel wall. As I have said many times in the past, multi-core is parallel computing and parallel programming is hard, expensive, and in some cases non-portable.

Ubuntu drops SPARC from releases

Filed under
Ubuntu

tectonic.co.za: The Ubuntu Technical Board has decided to remove SPARC from its list of official releases. In an email to the Ubuntu developer list today, Matt Zimmerman said the board had decided that “offically released architectures for Ubuntu 8.04 will be i386 and amd64.

Fosdem: A Festival of Free

Filed under
OSS

linuxinsider.com: With all the hype surrounding free and open source tools the operating system Linux, the Web server software Apache, the Web browser Mozilla Firefox, it is easy to forget the men (and, occasionally, women) who develop them.

Extend Amarok with useful scripts

Filed under
Software

linux.com: Amarok is a popular audio player under Linux. It can manage external storage devices, transfer music to your iPod, display lyrics, and play various formats. Although Amarok supports scripts to extend its functionality, not many users know about the powerful features that these simple plugins can provide.

Novell from an openSUSE perspective

Filed under
SUSE

mschlander.wordpress: The relationship between openSUSE and Novell is pretty difficult to describe. Ideally openSUSE should be viewed 100% as a community project, where the people employed by Novell, who do the lion’s share of the work, are also seen as members of the openSUSE community on the same level as volunteer contributors.

Create Games the Easy Way with Pygame

Filed under
Gaming

junauza.blogspot: Pygame is a cross-platform set of Python modules designed for writing video games. It is possible to write simple but decent games with just a few lines of code using the Pygame module. Anyone with a little programming knowledge can create like some of the games shown below:

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Answers to Linux Questions

  • Canon i250 on Ubuntu 7.10
  • Obscure Linux Commands: Some of My Favorite Incantations
  • How do you check if your webcam is working properly?
  • HowTo: Convert First Letter of Dir Folder to Uppercase
  • Creating the debian-sys-maint MySQL account on a Debian or Ubuntu system
  • Reading compressed Files

Consumer hardware shipping too many Linuxes by default

Filed under
Linux

bytebot.net: At the top of my head now, Linux is hitting the mainstream desktop market, in many variants. So what am I getting at? Complexity.

RHEL 5.2: Changing the compass?

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: The release of RHEL 5.2 with "re-basing" of the "top desktop applications" would lead to a strange situation: the conservative, long time supported RHEL, that usually doesn't upgrade any package if backporting the patches is feasible, will become much fresher than Debian stable!

Foresight Linux 2.0 Features GNOME 2.22

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: Foresight Linux 2.0 has been released, bringing you the latest GNOME 2.22. Foresight Linux is an rPath-based distribution with a lot of apps that make your computing experience much easier.

Play Windows games on Linux with PlayOnLinux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If you are an avid gamer, you probably dual-boot your favorite Linux distribution with Windows, because that's where you find most new cutting-edge games. But what if you could run your Windows games on Linux?

Does choice make support for Linux harder?

Filed under
Ubuntu

progbox.co.uk: Upon listening to lugradio the other day, I was interested by their segment on support. It got me thinking, does the choice ethic that we are so proud of actually make it harder to support the product. Imagine: In the windows world - Click on the start button. How would we approach that in the Linux world? Click on whatever you normally click on to start programs up.

Getting the login right: moving from xdm to gdm or kdm

Filed under
HowTos

freesoftwaremagazine.com: For years now, I have been clinging to xdm as my display manager; years ago, I spent several days tweaking the configuration files of xbanner and xdm to get it to look “just so”, and I didn’t want to change it. But no more! I decided to spend a little time trying to get each display manager to look “right” with my original login screen design.

Creative Commons Releases LiveContent DVD

Filed under
Linux

fanaticattack.com: The Creative Commons recently released LiveContent 2.0 a Free Live DVD. We checked it out and wanted to give you an overview of what it’s all about. Basically, it’s a Fedora Live DVD with free and open source content that comes loaded with Creative Commons’ (CC) licensed material.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security: DHS on Potential Voting Machines Cracking, Joomla Patches Critical Flaw

  • DHS tells 21 states they were Russia hacking targets before 2016 election
  • 1. WikiLeaks, Russian edition: how it’s being viewed
    Russia has been investing heavily in a vision of cyberdemocracy that will link the public directly with government officials to increase official responsiveness. But it is also enforcing some of the toughest cybersecurity laws to empower law enforcement access to communications and ban technologies that could be used to evade surveillance. Could WikiLeaks put a check on Russia’s cyber regime? This week, the online activist group released the first of a promised series of document dumps on the nature and workings of Russia’s surveillance state. So far, the data has offered no bombshells. “It’s mostly technical stuff. It doesn’t contain any state contracts, or even a single mention of the FSB [security service], but there is some data here that’s worth publishing,” says Andrei Soldatov, coauthor of “The Red Web,” a history of the Soviet and Russian internet. But, he adds, “Anything that gets people talking about Russia's capabilities and actions in this area should be seen as a positive development.”
  • Joomla patches eight-year-old critical CMS bug
    Joomla has patched a critical bug which could be used to steal account information and fully compromise website domains. This week, the content management system (CMS) provider issued a security advisory detailing the flaw, which is found in the LDAP authentication plugin. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) is used by Joomla to access directories over TCP/IP. The plugin is integrated with the CMS. Joomla considers the bug a "medium" severity issue, but according to researchers from RIPS Technologies, the problem is closer to a critical status.
  • Joomla! 3.7.5 - Takeover in 20 Seconds with LDAP Injection
    With over 84 million downloads, Joomla! is one of the most popular content management systems in the World Wide Web. It powers about 3.3% of all websites’ content and articles. Our code analysis solution RIPS detected a previously unknown LDAP injection vulnerability in the login controller. This one vulnerability could allow remote attackers to leak the super user password with blind injection techniques and to fully take over any Joomla! <= 3.7.5 installation within seconds that uses LDAP for authentication. Joomla! has fixed the vulnerability in the latest version 3.8.

OpenSUSE fonts – The sleeping beauty guide

Pandora’s box of fonts is one of the many ailments of the distro world. As long as we do not have standards, and some rather strict ones at that, we will continue to suffer from bad fonts, bad contrast, bad ergonomics, and in general, settings that are not designed for sustained, prolonged use. It’s a shame, because humans actually use computers to interface with information, to READ text and interpret knowledge using the power of language. It’s the most critical element of the whole thing. OpenSUSE under-delivers on two fonts – anti-aliasing and hinting options that are less than ideal, and then it lacks the necessary font libraries to make a relevant, modern and pleasing desktop for general use. All of this can be easily solved if there’s more attention, love and passion for the end product. After all, don’t you want people to be spending a lot of time interacting, using and enjoying the distro? Hopefully, one day, all this will be ancient history. We will be able to choose any which system and never worry or wonder how our experience is going to be impacted by the choice of drivers, monitors, software frameworks, or even where we live. For the time being, if you intend on using openSUSE, this little guide should help you achieve a better, smoother, higher-quality rendering of fonts on the screen, allowing you to enjoy the truly neat Plasma desktop to the fullest. Oh, in the openSUSE review, I promised we would handle this, and handle it we did! Take care. Read more

Today in Techrights

Direct Rendering Manager and VR HMDs Under Linux

  • Intel Prepping Support For Huge GTT Pages
    Intel OTC developers are working on support for huge GTT pages for their Direct Rendering Manager driver.
  • Keith Packard's Work On Better Supporting VR HMDs Under Linux With X.Org/DRM
    Earlier this year Keith Packard started a contract gig for Valve working to improve Linux's support for virtual reality head-mounted displays (VR HMDs). In particular, working on Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) and X.Org changes needed so VR HMDs will work well under Linux with the non-NVIDIA drivers. A big part of this work is the concept of DRM leases, a new Vulkan extension, and other changes to the stack.