Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Sunday, 26 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Biggest systemd Myths srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 8:21pm
Story Best alternative Linux desktops: 5 reviewed and rated srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 6:23pm
Story A quick look at Manjaro srlinuxx 27/01/2013 - 5:05am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 11:19pm
Story Ubuntu Not Switching to Rolling Release Model srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:55am
Story Xfce 4.12 Desktop Is Moving Along For Release Soon srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:53am
Story Design the New OpenMandriva Logo srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:51am
Story Does SUSE Linux Have A Future? srlinuxx 26/01/2013 - 12:50am
Story Cinnarch preview srlinuxx 25/01/2013 - 9:50pm
Story 9 Exciting Features Fedora 18 Has To Offer srlinuxx 25/01/2013 - 9:48pm

Linux: It's Not Just for Servers Anymore

Filed under
Linux

wired.com: After years of being relegated to server racks and the desktops of ultrageeks, Linux is finally making some headway as a viable alternative to Windows on the consumer desktop.

Inkscape Tutorial - Web 2.0 Logos

Filed under
HowTos

penguin pete: Bleah! More glossy crystal buttons and mirrored text! If you're anything like me, your reaction these days to the Web 2.0 aesthetic style is a cry of dismay and the gesture of your finger in your mouth in a gagging motion. Ten years from now, the world will look back on the currently popular art style as "the disco era of the web".

Mark Webbink's next step toward open source revolution

Filed under
Linux

Matt Asay: I received a sad piece of news today in my email: Mark Webbink is retiring from Red Hat, effective at the end of August. He will be missed.

openDesktop.org as the new head of the kde-look.org family

Filed under
Web

liquidat: The family around kde-look.org grew again and launched opendesktop.org as a central place for developers, artists and other contributors. To round up the entire collection of family members gtk-apps.org and cli-apps.org were launched as well.

OLPC: The Secret Goal

Filed under
OLPC

Beranger: Based on the HUGE interest (hype?) that XO has acquired (possibly more than Xbox 360, Wii, the iPhone and Harry Potter altogether), deciding to offer retail sales at 2x or 3x the mass-production price (after they repeatedly said there won't be any retail sales at all!) would be a tremendously profitable business, with a 100% to 200% profit margin!

Sun exec accuses Microsoft of 'patent terrorism'

Filed under
Microsoft

ZDNet: The efforts of Microsoft to pressure the Linux community over alleged and unspecified patents is akin to "patent terrorism", according to a local executive for Sun Microsystems.

What I have learned through adopting Linux

Filed under
Linux

Lex Loci Linux: I have learned that I don't have to be tied to Windows anymore. Most of what I do, does not require Windows, so it's much more secure than my Windows base applications.

Finding a New Home For Thunderbird

Filed under
Moz/FF

Scott MacGregor: Mitchell’s blog talks about the need to find a new organizational home for Thunderbird. I wanted to share my thoughts about why we need to do something, provide more detail about what David and I feel would be best for Thunderbird and its users, and to solicit feedback from the community for their thoughts and ideas.

Device Support Ubuntu: Gutsy Gibbon…

Filed under
Ubuntu

blog.notsosoft.net: Hey folks, so I don’t know how many of you lovely happy people have been running the latest development version of Ubuntu, codenamed Gutsy Gibbon. Gosh, I’ve been running it since its second week in existence, and I must say I’m well pleased.

French National Assembly receives first open source laptops

Filed under
Ubuntu

mozillalinks: French National Assembly logoAs announced last year, open source software loaded laptops are now being delivered to members of the French National Assembly.

Linux: Historical Kernel Tree with Git

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In a recent lkml thread, the idea of getting the entire Linux kernel history into a git repository was discussed. Linus Torvalds noted, "I actually tried to get something like this together back in the BK days and early in the SCO saga. It was pretty painful to try to find all the historic trees and patches - they're all in different format, and some of them are unreliable."

A Look at the One Laptop Per Child Computer

Filed under
OLPC

Washington Post: After months of knowing the One Laptop Per Child project's XO computer only through pictures and blog postings, I got to spend an hour or so playing with a couple of test units last Thursday -- courtesy of two D.C.-area residents involved with this effort.

Ubuntu Live: the exhibit hall

Filed under
Ubuntu

arstechnica: The Ubuntu Live exhibit hall was small, but a very nice assortment of companies and organizations were present, including Intel, Sun, the Free Software Foundation, IEEE, OpenMoko, and System 76.

Come and get it: Fedora laptop for $150

Filed under
Linux

ZDNet Blogs: Would you try a $150 laptop powered by Fedora? Sure you would. And apparently so are a lot of other folks. A Swedish company called Medison has unveiled a laptop called the Celebrity. Medison’s laptop is the latest in a race to the bottom of the pricing barrel.

Review: CentOS 5

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Raiden's Realm: CentOS, a derivative of Red Hat Enterprise Linux, was started back in 2002 with its first beta versions appearing in 2003. CentOS is designed to be a high end server OS that runs on a wide variety of different architectures, including x86, Intel IA-64 (Itanium 64-bit), x86-64, PowerPC/32, IBM Mainframe, Alpha, and SPARC. Given all this versatility, and its roots as a server OS, some may be lead to ask the question, “Does it make a good desktop distribution?” We’re about to find out.

GIMP 2.4 Almost Ready -> 2.3.19 Development Release

Filed under
GIMP

We are getting ready for the GIMP 2.4 release. Most of the outstanding issues have been resolved or will be resolved soon. You can get a snapshot of current development by downloading the source code for GIMP 2.3.19 from the usual places.

New Compiz Fusion Effects

Filed under
Software

The Linux Movement: So the Compiz Fusion blog hasn't been updated in a while, but now they have and with some new effects. The first effect is a bit funky, and I probably will not use it. But I guess it would be fun to play around with. The second new effect is the one I am excited for! But I will save the best for last.

Ubuntu 7.04 is a refreshing Linux-based alternative to Vista

Filed under
Ubuntu

laptopmag.com: Because Linux has always been a bit of a mystery to most people, we want to take this opportunity to answer the myriad questions you might have about this promising OS while sharing what we like about it and what we don't.

BBC Trust backs calls for Linux iPlayer

Filed under
Linux

the register: The BBC Trust met with the Open Source Consortium (OSC) yesterday to discuss the controversy raised by the BBC's iPlayer, which will only work on Windows XP.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

Security Leftovers

  • Major Cloudflare bug leaked sensitive data from customers’ websites
    Cloudflare revealed a serious bug in its software today that caused sensitive data like passwords, cookies, authentication tokens to spill in plaintext from its customers’ websites. The announcement is a major blow for the content delivery network, which offers enhanced security and performance for more than 5 million websites. This could have allowed anyone who noticed the error to collect a variety of very personal information that is typically encrypted or obscured.
  • SHA1 collisions make Git vulnerable to attakcs by third-parties, not just repo maintainers
    After sitting through an endless flood of headless-chicken messages on multiple media about SHA-1 being fatally broken, I thought I'd do a quick writeup about what this actually means.
  • Torvalds patches git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks
    Linux creator Linus Torvalds says two sets of patches have been posted for the distributed version control system git to mitigate against SHA-1 attacks which are based on the method that Dutch and Google engineers detailed last week. The post by Torvalds detailing this came after reports emerged of the version control system used by the WebKit browser engine repository becoming corrupted after the two proof-of-concept PDF files that were released by the Dutch and Google researchers were uploaded to the repository.
  • Linus Torvalds on "SHA1 collisions found"
  • More from Torvalds on SHA1 collisions
    I thought I'd write an update on git and SHA1, since the SHA1 collision attack was so prominently in the news. Quick overview first, with more in-depth explanation below: (1) First off - the sky isn't falling. There's a big difference between using a cryptographic hash for things like security signing, and using one for generating a "content identifier" for a content-addressable system like git. (2) Secondly, the nature of this particular SHA1 attack means that it's actually pretty easy to mitigate against, and there's already been two sets of patches posted for that mitigation. (3) And finally, there's actually a reasonably straightforward transition to some other hash that won't break the world - or even old git repositories.
  • [Older] Wire’s independent security review
    Ever since Wire launched end-to-end encryption and open sourced its apps one question has consistently popped up: “Is there an independent security review available?” Well, there is now!
  • Malware Lets a Drone Steal Data by Watching a Computer’s Blinking LED
  • FCC to halt rule that protects your private data from security breaches
    The Federal Communications Commission plans to halt implementation of a privacy rule that requires ISPs to protect the security of its customers' personal information. The data security rule is part of a broader privacy rulemaking implemented under former Chairman Tom Wheeler but opposed by the FCC's new Republican majority. The privacy order's data security obligations are scheduled to take effect on March 2, but Chairman Ajit Pai wants to prevent that from happening. The data security rule requires ISPs and phone companies to take "reasonable" steps to protect customers' information—such as Social Security numbers, financial and health information, and Web browsing data—from theft and data breaches. "Chairman Pai is seeking to act on a request to stay this rule before it takes effect on March 2," an FCC spokesperson said in a statement to Ars.
  • Google releases details of another Windows bug
  • How to secure the IoT in your organisation: advice and best practice for securing the Internet of Things
    All of the major technology vendors are making a play in the Internet of Things space and there are few organisations that won’t benefit from collecting and analysing the vast array of new data that will be made available. But the recent Mirai botnet is just one example of the tremendous vulnerabilities that exist with unsecured access points. What are the main security considerations and best practices, then, for businesses seeking to leverage the potential of IoT?

GNOME News

  • FEDORA and GNOME at UNSAAC
    Today I did a talk to introduce students of UNSAAC to the Fedora and GNOME world as it was announced by the GDG Cusco group. We started at 8:30 am and it was a free event:
  • GNOME Theme For Firefox Gets Updated, Looking Great
    There are a lot of complete themes for Firefox. We spoke about 3 of them in one of our previous articles. The good news today is that “GNOME 3” theme (which was also called Adwaita) for Firefox was updated. Now it’s working with all versions higher than Firefox 45. Previously, the theme didn’t work with the recent versions of Firefox. So people had to switch to other available themes. Fortunately, this finally changed today when another developer took the code, fixed the compatibility problems and re-released the theme.
  • GStreamer Now Supports Multi-Threaded Scaling/Conversion For Big Performance Win
    With the addition of over two thousand lines of code, GStreamer's video-convert code within gst-plugins-base is now properly multi-threaded. Video scaling and conversion can now be multi-threaded when using GStreamer. With this multi-threading work by Sebastian Dröge, he commented with the commit, "During tests, this gave up to 1.8x speedup with 2 threads and up to 3.2x speedup with 4 threads when converting e.g. 1080p to 4k in v210."

Linux and Graphics

  • OpenRISC For Linux 4.11 Gets Some Optimizations, Prepares For SMP
    OpenRISC continues advancing with its sights on being a free and open processor for embedded systems using the RISC instruction set architecture. Last year the Linux kernel got a new OpenRISC maintainer and for Linux 4.11 there is a fair amount of interesting changes for the OpenRISC code within the mainline tree.
  • drm for v4.11 - main pull request
    The tinydrm code seems like absolute pure shit that has never seen a compiler. I'm upset, because I expect better quality control. In fact, I expect *some* qualitty control, and this piece-of-shit driver has clearly seen none at all. And those patches were apparently committed yesterday. WHAT THE ACTUAL FUCK?
  • [Old] A Guide Through The Linux Sound API Jungle
    At the Audio MC at the Linux Plumbers Conference one thing became very clear: it is very difficult for programmers to figure out which audio API to use for which purpose and which API not to use when doing audio programming on Linux.
  • Mesa, Vulkan & Other Driver Talks From 2017 Embedded Linux Conference
  • Fuzzing Mesa Drivers Begin To Uncover Bugs
    Last December we wrote about work being done on fuzzing OpenGL shaders leading to wild differences with the work being done at the Imperial College London. While they were testing other drivers on different operating systems, they have now fired up tests of Mesa.
  • Wayland's Weston 2.0 Compositor Released
    Wayland 1.13 was released earlier this week but the adjoining Weston compositor update didn't happen at the same time due to some last minute changes needing more time to test, but this Friday, Weston 2.0 is now shipping. But before getting too excited, Weston 2.0 doesn't represent some break-through changes but rather was bumped away from the Wayland versioning rhythm due to its new output configuration API breaking Weston's ABI. Thus the major version bump.
  • weston 2.0.0
    Welcome to the official release of Weston 2.0. There are no changes since RC2.

today's howtos