Language Selection

English French German Italian Portuguese Spanish

About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 17 Jan 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

Search This Site

Quick Roundup

Getting the most from open source

bbc: Free. It is not something Western culture does particularly well. It is certainly not something that features big in the plans of the millionaires at Microsoft, Apple and Intel - to name but a few. This week we take a look at the open source operating system Linux and make a few software recommendations.

Inside One Laptop per Child: Episode 03

Filed under
OLPC

Red Hat Mag: Since piloting this video series, we’ve received lots of questions about the XO’s mesh network. How can these laptops “talk” to each other even without widespread internet access? How is the network they create different from the network at your home or office? Episode 03 explains it all.

Pick Your Open Source Poison: Microsoft's Patent Claims Or GPLv3

Filed under
OSS

Information Week: After months of debate, the release of the next version of the General Public License, under which most open source products are issued, is imminent. The Free Software Foundation plans to issue GPL version 3 in its final form June 29. As the revised license nears completion, however, new doubts are being raised over whether it's headed in the right direction.

NVIDIA 100.14.09 Display Driver Released

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: We have previously looked at the NVIDIA 100.14.03 and 100.14.06 display drivers, but this afternoon we finally have our hands on the stable NVIDIA 100.14.09 driver. New in version 100.14.09 is added GeForce 8 and Quadro product support, improved notebook GPU support, improved RenderAccel support for sub-pixel anti-aliased fonts, added Xv brightness and contrast controls, improved interaction with newer kernels, and fixing an issue with nvidia-settings.

Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon 7.10 Tribe 1 - A Review?

Filed under
Ubuntu

shift+backspace: A couple of days ago, the first alpha (Tribe 1) of Ubuntu Gutsy Gibbon 7.10 (successor to Feisty Fawn 7.04) was released. I figured I would download the Gutsy and see how it performed on my laptop.

The Linux Battle: Ubuntu vs. Fedora

Filed under
Linux

romow.com: More and more people are venturing away from Microsoft Windows and finding their way to open source operating systems. Just as more people are using them, more and more Linux distributions are available. Among the open source operating system crowd, there are 2 main contenders: Ubuntu and Fedora.

Thank You, Builders

Filed under
OSS

Linux Today: Anytime I have a fun meeting with a vendor it's a bonus; they're all nice folks, but they're not always entertaining. Some are, well, I won't say boring, but certainly dry. So whatever else Fonality has going for it, it has a fun CEO who seems excited about the company. The whole VoIP space is fascinating to me anyway, because it demonstrates the sheer power and inventiveness of open source.

Main stream Ubuntu - bug reporting users that aren’t packagers

Filed under
Ubuntu

Colin Charles: Today, I was looking for video podcasting software on Linux. PenguinTV came out tops. I got version 2.80 and I thought I’d bug report it: #119262. All in hopes of a newer version. Within the hour, my request got rejected.

IBM undeterred by setbacks to ODF adoption

Filed under
Interviews

linuxworld: You might think the steady defeat of bills in several U.S. states to mandate the use of free interoperable file formats might dampen the spirits of IBM Corp., one of the prime supporters of the OpenDocument Format (ODF). Far from it, said IBM's Bob Sutor, who sees the recent news as par for the course in the evolution of any open standard.

Scorched 3D makes tank battles fun

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Whether or not you remember the days when DOS was DOS and real geeks played Scorched Earth, a turn-based warfare game with tanks trading shots at each other until one was destroyed, you might find Scorched 3D, a modern remake of the old classic, just as addicting today as those playing the original did then. Not only that, it is the Project of the Month for May on SourceForge.net.

eyeOS - the open source web desktop

Filed under
OS

FOSSWire: With more and more stuff moving over to running on the web these days, and with emerging ‘web desktops’, it’s about time we strayed from our normal desktop Linux territory and took a look online. eyeOS is a project that bills itself as an open source web operating system.

Is the Linux development model flawed?

Filed under
Linux

techworld: Back in the early 1990s, when Linux initiator Linus Torwalds and open source software started to make headlines, the idea of giving software away seemed crazy. Looking at the headway the movement has made since then, you might be forgiven for wondering why Linux desktops have failed to become as ubiquitous as Linux servers are.

First look: Firefox 3 alpha 5

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica: The fifth public alpha build of Firefox 3 has been officially released. The new alpha build, which is codenamed Gran Paradiso, features early components of the revamped Places system, a cohesive storage framework that will unify bookmark and history storage.

Also: Quick Tip: Turn off Prefetching in Firefox

The Lesser Apps of KDE - Development

Filed under
KDE

Raiden's Realm: One of the lesser known features of KDE is the selection of Development applications that come bundled with it. With these tools you can create quite a few different things ranging from programs to webpages to simple scripts that can be used for a variety of purposes either professionally or personally. So let's look at each of these and what they can do for you.

ATI R200 Linux Driver Redux

Filed under
Software

Phoronix: Last week we had published The Truth About ATI/AMD & Linux, and to no real surprise, the feedback ranged from beliefs that it was propaganda to others being grateful that AMD finally shared some additional information with their Linux customers about the fglrx development cycle. While the article was far from being propaganda, what had outraged a number of open-source developers were AMD's comments on the R200 support or there the lack of. In this article, we have a few additional comments to share along with what some open-source developers had to say about AMD's information.

Fedora’s rc becomes dependency aware

Filed under
Linux

/home/liquidat: Harald Hoyer, a Red Hat developer, has released a first draft with details of the possible new Fedora init system. The /etc/rc.d/rc system will become dependency aware.

What is Microsoft really gaining from open source FUD?

Filed under
Microsoft

Dana Blankenhorn: In all the stories about Microsoft’s attack on open source, I have seen little talk about what the company is gaining in all this. I don't think it's money.

Is Solaris truly open source?

Filed under
OSS

GCN Blogs: Lately, every time we interview Bill Vass, president of Sun Federal, he bemoans how Sun software isn't considered open source. He's right. Sure, everyone knows Java and Solaris are open source, but you rarely hear those names brandied about during discussions of open source.

Deploy Red Hat Across Multiple Computers Using Tivoli

Filed under
News

This tutorial shows you how to use Tivoli Provisioning Manager for OS Deployment to create installation images and manage packages for an actual deployment of RedHat Enterprise Linux.

Fedora 7: They've jettisoned the Core

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

techiemoe.com: As I've noted on forums in the past, the Fedora project has failed to excite me for a long time. I wasn't really looking forward to trying out this latest iteration. As much as Fedora claims to be the "bleeding-edge" distribution they rarely if ever innovate anything.

Syndicate content

More in Tux Machines

KDE Leftovers

  • Integrate Your Android Device With Ubuntu Using KDE Connect Indicator Fork
    KDE Connect is a tool which allows your Android device to integrate with your Linux desktop. With KDE Connect Indicator, you can use KDE Connect on desktop that support AppIndicators, like Unity, Xfce (Xubuntu), and so on.
  • FirstAid – PDF Help Viewer
    in the recent months, I didn’t find much time to spend on Kate/KTextEditor development. But at least I was now able to spend a bit more time on OpenSource & Qt things even during work time in our company. Normally I am stuck there with low level binary or source analysis work. [...] Therefore, as our GUIs are developed with Qt anyways, we did take a look at libpoppler (and its Qt 5 bindings), which is the base of Okular, too.
  • KBibTeX 0.6.1-rc2 released
    After quite some delay, I finally assembled a second release candidate for KBibTeX 0.6.1. Version 0.6.1 will be the last release in the 0.6.x series.
  • Meet KDE at FOSDEM Next Month
    Next month is FOSDEM, the largest gathering of free software developers anywhere in Europe. FOSDEM 2017 is being held at the ULB Campus Solbosch on Saturday 4th and Sunday 5th of February. Thousands of coders, designers, maintainers and managers from projects as popular as Linux and as obscure as Tcl/Tk will descend on the European capital Brussels to talk, present, show off and drink beer.

Leftovers: OSS

  • D-Wave Unveils Open-Source Software for Quantum Computing
    Canada-based D-Wave Systems has released an open-source software tool designed to help developers program quantum computers, Wired reported Wednesday.
  • D-Wave builds open quantum computing software development ecosystem
    D-Wave Systems has released an open source quantum computing chunk of software. Quantum computing, as we know, moves us on from the world of mere 1’s and 0’s in binary to the new level of ‘superposition’ qubits that can represent many more values and therefore more computing power — read this accessible piece for a simple explanation of quantum computing.
  • FOSS Compositing With Natron
    Anyone who likes to work with graphics will at one time or another find compositing software useful. Luckily, FOSS has several of the best in Blender and Natron.
  • Hadoop Creator Doug Cutting: 5 Ways to Be Successful with Open Source in 2017
    Because of my long-standing association with the Apache Software Foundation, I’m often asked the question, “What’s next for open source technology?” My typical response is variations of “I don’t know” to “the possibilities are endless.” Over the past year, we’ve seen open source technology make strong inroads into the mainstream of enterprise technology. Who would have thought that my work on Hadoop ten years ago would impact so many industries – from manufacturing to telecom to finance. They have all taken hold of the powers of the open source ecosystem not only to improve the customer experience, become more innovative and grow the bottom line, but also to support work toward the greater good of society through genomic research, precision medicine and programs to stop human trafficking, as just a few examples. Below I’ve listed five tips for folks who are curious about how to begin working with open source and what to expect from the ever-changing ecosystem.
  • Radio Free HPC Looks at New Open Source Software for Quantum Computing
    In this podcast, the Radio Free HPC team looks at D-Wave’s new open source software for quantum computing. The software is available on github along with a whitepaper written by Cray Research alums Mike Booth and Steve Reinhardt.
  • Why events matter and how to do them right
    Marina Paych was a newcomer to open source software when she left a non-governmental organization for a new start in the IT sector—on her birthday, no less. But the real surprise turned out to be open source. Fast forward two years and this head of organizational development runs an entire department, complete with a promotional staff that strategically markets her employer's open source web development services on a worldwide scale.
  • Exploring OpenStack's Trove DBaaS Cloud Servic
    You can install databases such as MySQL, PostgreSQL, or even MongoDB very quickly thanks to package management, but the installation is not even half the battle. A functioning database also needs user accounts and several configuration steps for better performance and security. This need for additional configuration poses challenges in cloud environments. You can always manually install a virtual machine in traditional settings, but cloud users want to generate an entire virtual environment from a template. Manual intervention is difficult or sometimes even impossible.
  • Mobile Edge Computing Creates ‘Tiny Data Centers’ at the Edge
    “Usually access networks include all kinds of encryption and tunneling protocols,” says Fite. “It’s not a standard, native-IP environment.” Saguna’s platform creates a bridge between the access network to a small OpenStack cloud, which works in a standard IP environment. It provides APIs about such things as location, registration for services, traffic direction, radio network services, and available bandwidth.

Leftovers: Ubuntu and Debian

  • Debian Creeps Closer To The Next Release
    I’ve been alarmed by the slow progress of Debian towards the next release. They’ve had several weird gyrations in numbers of “release-critical” bugs and still many packages fail to build from source. Last time this stage, they had only a few hundred bugs to go. Now they are over 600. I guess some of that comes from increasing the number of included packages. There are bound to be more bad interactions, like changing the C compiler. I hate that language which seems to be a moving target… Systemd seems to be smoother but it still gives me problems.
  • Mir: 2016 end of year review
    2016 was a good year for Mir – it is being used in more places, it has more and better upstream support and it is easier to use by downstream projects. 2017 will be even better and will see version 1.0 released.
  • Ubuntu Still Planning For Mir 1.0 In 2017
    Alan Griffiths of Canonical today posted a year-in-review for Mir during 2016 and a look ahead to this year.
  • Linux Mint 18.1 “Serena” KDE – BETA Release

GNU Gimp Development

  • Community-supported development of GEGL now live
    Almost every new major feature people have been asking us for, be it high bit depth support, or full CMYK support, or layer effects, would be impossible without having a robust, capable image processing core. Øyvind Kolås picked up GEGL in mid-2000s and has been working on it in his spare time ever since. He is the author of 42% of commits in GEGL and 50% of commits in babl (pixel data conversion library).
  • 2016 in review
    When we released GIMP 2.9.2 in late 2015 and stepped over into 2016, we already knew that we’d be doing mostly polishing. This turned out to be true to a larger extent, and most of the work we did was under-the-hood changes. But quite a few new features slipped in. So, what are the big user-visible changes for GIMP in 2016?