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About Tux Machines

Friday, 24 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Perfect Desktop - Linux Mint 15 (Olivia) falko 09/06/2013 - 11:33am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 08/06/2013 - 2:41pm
Poll Ubuntu srlinuxx 08/06/2013 - 1:21pm
Story The Wayland Situation: Facts About X vs. Wayland srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:02pm
Story The trouble with UEFI Boot, and a helping hand from a BIOS firmware update srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:01pm
Story Why we need an Anti-Virus in Linux? srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 11:00pm
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.10 (Part 1) srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 9:17pm
Story Ubuntu holds its own srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:42pm
Story Fedora Day Two: Customisation srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:39pm
Story Young maker says Raspberry Pi is way to go srlinuxx 07/06/2013 - 6:38pm

The 40 coolest free applications around

Filed under
Software

seopher: Everyone loves free software (open source or otherwise) and this list demonstrates quite how many excellent applications can be had for free. If you thought you needed to buy something - maybe check this list first.

Review: Xubuntu 7.04 revisited

Filed under
Ubuntu

click: After trying quite a few Linux distributions that offer Xfce desktops (Slackware, Vector, ZenWalk, Debian), it was time to revisit Xubuntu 7.04, install it from scratch and see how it fares.

Sidux 2007-03.1 "Gaia": A closer look

Filed under
Reviews

Unless you're able to deal with such esoteric problems as diagnosing a buggy post-install script, or figuring out how to deal with a major change in the directory structure of X.org, you might occasionally find running a Debian Sid-based system to be more than you can handle. And that's where Sidux comes in. Sidux's goal is to allow mere mortals the ability to run Debian Sid on the desktop, in order to take advantage of the latest Debian software available. Its development team helps guide its users through the occasional bumps in Sid, via IRC and its user forum. Another goal is to offer a consistent release cycle. Sidux comes with a variety of "convenience scripts" and utilities you won't find in Debian proper, that make it easier to do such things as administer your system and install proprietary software.

Linux: CFS Updates, -v20

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Ingo Molnar announced version 20 of his Completely Fair Scheduler patchset, offering further cleanups for the new scheduler code that will be part of the upcoming 2.6.23 kernel, "there have been lots of small regression fixes, speedups, debug enhancements and tidy-ups - many of which can be user-visible."

Glick brings better standalone application bundles to Linux

Filed under
Software

arstechnica: There is value in experiments that aim to provide insight into the potential of alternate application deployment solutions or new technologies that could be used to augment existing package management systems. One such experiment is Glick.

Microsoft's Open Source Trashware

Filed under
Microsoft

eWeek: I recently took a look at Microsoft's most active open-source projects and—there's no polite way to say this—they are all junk.

Some Howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to use GNOME to manage end users' desktops on SUSE Linux Enterprise Desktop 10

  • Quick Tip: Firefox Ctrl+Tab Popup Menu Switcher
  • Automated failover and recovery of virtualized guests in Advanced Platform
  • Ubuntu: Mounting remote filesystem using sshfs (FUSE)
  • Beryl - Compiz-Fusion crash with Video playback?
  • How-To Configure “Hidden” Compiz/Xgl Effects (Updated)
  • Finding Advanced Settings on GNOME
  • /etc/rc.local
  • The awk Command
  • using the linux yes command

Linux vs. BSD, What's the Difference?

Filed under
BSD

linuxdevcenter: Ubuntu is known as Linux for Human Beings. PC-BSD, on the other hand, "has been designed with the casual computer user in mind.

Comprehensive integrity verification with md5deep

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: Most of the ISO images and other software you grab off the Internet come with a message digest -- a cryptographic hash value that you can use to verify their integrity. While almost all Linux distributions come with utilities to read and generate digests using MD5 and SHA1 hash functions, the md5deep utilities can do that and more.

Unboxing My Dell Inspiron with Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

gearlog.com: I spread out the CPU, LCD widescreen monitor, mouse, and keyboard on the living room floor. From there, I transferred all of the items to the office, and timed the set-up process: a quick 5 minutes and 49 seconds (Sorry Kyle's wife!) from plugging in to powering up to surfing PCMag.com. After I got the Internet working, I decided to be brave and install our F5D7000 Belkin Wireless G Card all by myself!

Stable kernel 2.6.22.5 is Out

Filed under
Linux

LWN: The 2.6.22.5 stable kernel update is out. It contains about 20 patches for serious problems; none of them appear to be security-related.

Linux Servers Continue Growth

Filed under
Linux

Linux Electrons: According to IDC's Worldwide Quarterly Server Tracker, factory revenue in the worldwide server market grew 6.3% year over year to $13.1 billion in the second quarter of 2007. This is the fifth consecutive quarter of positive revenue growth and the highest Q2 server revenue since the market peaked in 2000.

Managing and keeping tabs of network traffic on Linux

Filed under
Software

Rudd-O: Is your Net connection slow? Ever wonder what the hell’s going down the wire? Here are five free and effective tools to diagnose network traffic issues.

Total lunar eclipse set to turn Moon red

Filed under
Sci/Tech

iTWire: Early Tuesday morning, August 28, 2007, a colorful lunar eclipse will be visible from Australia, parts of Asia, Japan, and most of the Americas. In the United States, the western part of the country will be favored with the best conditions.

Microsoft Is Way Too Lazy to Fix Its Bugs

Filed under
OS

softpedia: Microsoft software versus open source software has been, and still is a never-ending debatable issue. Both camps have harsh supporters who claim their favorite is the best. Personally, I think that both sides have their own ups and downs and you cannot just say one of them is better. Just because one suits you better, doesn't imply the other is lame.

Linux-alliance sets free school software in Russia

Filed under
Linux

c•news: Russian Linux software developers have created an alliance to jointly participate in tenders to supply schools with open source software. The total number of specialist entering the alliance has exceeded the given number in Mandriva and Ubuntu Canonical producer, all in all.

OLPC team shows off UI design

Filed under
OLPC

arstechnica: At the keynote for the recent UX Week conference in Washington, DC, designers from the OLPC project and Pentagram Design gave a live demonstration of the laptop's Sugar user interface.

Are You Ready to Switch to Linux and Open Source Software?

Filed under
Linux

bmighty.com: Over a year ago, I wrote a column about the small and midsize market and Linux. I argued that there was never a better time for smaller companies to consider Linux and open source software. The market didn't seem to move as quickly as I thought it should.

Linus and Debian

Filed under
Linux

beranger: The most recent interview with Linus (by the publishing date) couldn't pass unnoticed: Linus Torvalds talks future of Linux. Torvalds looking naïve, mediocre and uninformed! It's at the same time: nice, intriguing, and outrageous.

A user-friendly version of Linux renders Microsoft obsolete

Filed under
Ubuntu

newstatesman: Since that fateful day in Buenos Aires, I have been borrowing a laptop that runs a version of the free and open-source operating system Linux. And my Summer of Ubuntu has proved to me that it can handle all these tasks fabulously.

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    CoreOS and OpenStack have a somewhat intertwined history, which is why it's somewhat surprising it took until today for CoreOS's Tectonic Kubernetes distribution to provide an installer that targets OpenStack cloud deployments.
  • Docker and Core OS plan to donate their container technologies to CNCF
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  • The peril in counting source lines on an OSS project
    There seems to be a phase that OSS projects go through where as they mature and gain traction. As they do it becomes increasingly important for vendors to point to their contributions to credibly say they are the ‘xyz’ company. Heptio is one such vendor operating in the OSS space, and this isn’t lost on us. :) It helps during a sales cycle to be able to say “we are the a big contributor to this project, look at the percentage of code and PRs we submitted”. While transparency is important as is recognizing the contributions that key vendors, focus on a single metric in isolation (and LoC in particular) creates a perverse incentive structure. Taken to its extreme it becomes detrimental to project health.
  • An Open Source Unicycle Motor
    And something to ponder. The company that sells this electric unicycle could choose to use a motor with open firmware or one with closed firmware. To many consumers, that difference might not be so significant. To this consumer, though, that’s a vital difference. To me, I fully own the product I bought when the firmware is open. I explain to others that they ought to choose that level of full ownership whenever they get a chance. And if they join a local makerspace, they will likely meet others with similar values. If you don’t yet have a makerspace in your community, inquire around to see if anyone is in the process of forming one. Then find ways to offer them support. That’s how we do things in the FOSS community.
  • The A/V guy’s take on PyCon Pune
    “This is crazy!”, that was my reaction at some point in PyCon Pune. This is one of my first conference where I participated in a lot of things starting from the website to audio/video and of course being the speaker. I saw a lot of aspects of how a conference works and where what can go wrong. I met some amazing people, people who impacted my life , people who I will never forget. I received so much of love and affection that I can never express in words. So before writing anything else I want to thank each and everyone of you , “Thank you!”.
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    The latest issue of the IEEE Robotics & Automation Magazine features a special report on open-source robotics hardware and its impact in the field.