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Saturday, 29 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Dev kit runs Linux on 1.2GHz quad-core ARM SoC Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 5:37pm
Story Making Linux More Accessible Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 5:34pm
Story The Linux 3.13 Kernel Is Already Super Exciting Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 5:19pm
Story Pear OS 8 Has Been Officially Released Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 5:16pm
Story Shall we waste twelve more years promoting Free office suites instead of open office formats? Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 5:08pm
Story AMD Lands Open-Source "Hawaii" GPU Driver Code Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 4:56pm
Story What Happened in Mobile is Happening in Desktops Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 12:59pm
Story Linux and Surveillance Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 11:46am
Story GNU/Linux Promises for 2014 Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 11:19am
Story Fedora 20 and Its Historical Significance Roy Schestowitz 11/11/2013 - 10:58am

UBIFS Writeback

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: UBIFS is described as, "a new flash file system which is designed to work on top of UBI." It has replaced the JFFS3 project, a choice explained on the project webpage, "we have realized that creating a scalable flash file system on top of bare flash is a difficult task, just because the flash media is so problematic (wear-leveling, bad eraseblocks).

Smolt towards other distributions; KnetworkManager devel version 0.7

Filed under
Software

liquidat: Smolt got a new project home page outside the Fedora project, making a step further towards other distributions. Also, KNetworkManager, the KDE tool for NetworkManager, was released in a new development branch which works with the new NM 0.7.

Open Source Software for Corporate IT

Filed under
OSS

opensource.sys-con.com: Selecting open source software is often bewildering for corporate IT departments accustomed to commercial closed source software. Of all the choices, which ones are likely to meet business and technology requirements? The Enterprise Open Source Directory (www.eosdirectory.com) helps companies find the gems they need.

New Release of Zonbu imminent

Filed under
Linux

mrzonbu.wordpress: Great news - a MAJOR new Zonbu OS release should be arriving any day now and I’ve been playing with an early preview. It’s full of lots of changes and improvements.

The Progress Of The RadeonHD Driver

Filed under
Software

phoronix: It's going on two weeks since the RadeonHD driver was made available, which is AMD's sanctioned open-source driver for the Radeon X1000 (R500) and Radeon HD 2000 (R600) series (as well as future generations of AMD GPUs). In this time, we have seen some great progress made with this open-source driver and have a few additional remarks to share about its status and the first bits of this driver's roadmap.

Linux and Me, Part 1: Distros and life beyond Windows

Filed under
Linux

carsonspost.wordpress: A year ago I had the frightening Windows realization that between Anti-Virus, Firewall and Defender (what does it do?) software, my PC was still not secure. I had a couple of days of stress as I tried to unload some ugly spyware. I found this really upsetting, unbelievably frustrating and that was the point where I no longer trusted Windows.

Taoism of open source

Filed under
OSS

linux.com: Confucius say, "Lao-tzu has passed us the Tao. In his mouth, there are no teeth but only a tongue. The hard ones (teeth) died, but the soft one (the tongue) lives; the soft power is stronger than the hard power. That's the Tao!" Open source is such a soft power.

Merging the iwlwifi Wireless Driver

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "It doesn't seem to pull any dependency nor affect any other external piece of code unless I'm missing something, so it's a perfect example of what we've been discussing back then: there is just no point not merging it at any time right ? :-)"

Also: Out of Memory Notification

Skype dev plans: GUI-less Skype for Linux and more

Filed under
Software

zdnet blogs: Last night at the Skype Developer Open House in San Jose, Skype presented the public roadmap for its API (Application Programming Interface) which outlines plans for a Web service API for Skype and the open sourcing of Skype4Com.

Customized spins of Fedora

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat Mag: When Fedora 7 was released, one of the big features that we talked about was the idea of customized spins of the distribution. Now that Fedora 8 is on the way, it’s useful to look and see how we have done, and what sort of custom spins have been created.

Liquid rescale feature now available as a GIMP plugin

Filed under
Software

All About Linux: One month back I had written about a content aware image rescaling technology. And I hoped that this technology will be incorporated in Gimp in the future. Well we didn't have to wait that long.

Does this script work for you?

Filed under
Software

SearchEnterpriseLinux blog: The script “survf” monitors a file so you can check whether this file is growing (e.g. during ftp transfer). If you link it to the name “survp,” it monitors a running process… when the process terminates it sounds a bell and terminates.

Ubuntu Gutsy Upgrade

Filed under
Ubuntu

the crumb: Tonight I updated my Ubuntu install to the latest Gutsy beta (7.10). So far so good. This is the first upgrade I’ve done where it correctly set my widescreen monitor resolution.

Need for security driving open-source use

Filed under
OSS

inquirer.net: Security is the number one reason why end-users deploy open-source software, according to a recent survey by research analyst IDC. Results suggest end-users in India and China deploy more open-source more than in Australia and Korea.

Also: IT Survival Guide: Exercise Caution Amid Open Source Options
And: Open source test successful

Kopete Onions

Filed under
KDE

Jucato’s blog: I have a somewhat indifferent attitude towards Kopete. I use it just because it happens to be the only viable one among its peers, but it most probably wouldn’t be my messaging client of choice if I were to find a better KDE alternative. But a few days ago, someone gave me a reason to love Kopete a bit more. Introducing Onion 75!

Also: Who wants to be a Kopete developer?

A Microsoft Windows / Linux Conspiracy Theory

Filed under
OS

Chris Pirillo: I think Microsoft has given up on Vista behind the scenes. I’m sending this via email because well, I know it sounds like tinfoil hat time, but I think there’s some validity to it.

Fl0p: Decoding the Evil Genius Mindset

Filed under
Humor

geek00l.blogspot: People who come from Unix background always have the real guts, and I bet you know what is RTFM all about. In fact it is Read The Fun Manual when you don't know how to use the commands or understand the technical section, sounds polite isn't it ;P

Talking to Torvalds

Filed under
Linux

bcs.org: He hates cellphones, but thinks that acceptance of the open source concept is now taken for granted - in a good way. BCS managing editor Brian Runciman interviewed Linus Torvalds after he received the BCS Lovelace Medal.

Showstoppers list for KDE’s 4.0 Beta 3 release

Filed under
KDE

liquidat: The KDE 4.0 Beta 3 release was shifted to October 10. Additionally the release team specified the KDE parts which have to be ready at the beta release date or which might otherwise be a showstopper.

putting a stake in the ground

Filed under
Moz/FF

zarro boogs: Performance matters more than ever in the browser space, and even as the Web grows up and gets bigger we need to continue to push harder on getting smaller and faster. The Firefox team is going to put a really big stake in the ground on performance, with the bulk of the focus on cleaning up our own house.

Also: Spread Firefox V.2 Getting Close

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More in Tux Machines

Google in Devices

  • Glow LEDs with Google Home
    For the part one, the custom commands were possible thanks to Google Actions Apis. I used API.AI for my purpose since they had good documentation. I wont go into detail explaining the form fields in Api.ai, they have done a good job with documentation and explaining part, I will just share my configurations screenshot for your quick reference and understanding. In Api.ai the conversations are broken into intents. I used one intent (Default Welcome Intent) and a followup intent (Default Welcome Intent – custom) for my application.
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Mobile, Tizen, and Android

Leftovers: OSS

  • Is The Open Source Software Movement A Technological Religion?
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  • Proprietary Election Systems: Summarily Disqualified
    Hello Open Source Software Community & U.S. Voters, I and the California Association of Voting Officials, represent a group of renowned computer scientists that have pioneered open source election systems, including, "one4all," New Hampshire’s Open Source Accessible Voting System (see attached). Today government organizations like NASA, the Department of Defense, and the U.S. Air Force rely on open source software for mission critical operations. I and CAVO believe voting and elections are indeed mission-critical to protect democracy and fulfill the promise of the United States of America as a representative republic. Since 2004, the open source community has advocated for transparent and secure—publicly owned—election systems to replace the insecure, proprietary systems most often deployed within communities. Open source options for elections systems can reduce the costs to taxpayers by as much as 50% compared to traditional proprietary options, which also eliminates vendor lock-in, or the inability of an elections office to migrate away from a solution as costs rise or quality decreases.
  • Microsoft SQL Server on Linux – YES, Linux! [Ed: Marketing and PR from IDG's "Microsoft Subnet"; This headline is a lie from Microsoft; something running on DrawBridge (proprietary Wine-like Windows layer) is not GNU/Linux]

Creative Commons News

  • Creative Commons Is Resurrecting Palmyra
    Creative Commons launched its 2017 Global Summit today with a rather moving surprise: a seven-foot-tall 3D printed replica of the Tetrapylon from Palmyra, Syria. For those who don't know the tragic situation, Palmyra is one of the most historic cities in the world — but it is being steadily destroyed by ISIS, robbing the world of countless irreplaceable artifacts and murdering those who have tried to protect them (the folks at Extra History have a pair of good summary videos discussing the history and the current situation in the city). Among ISIS's human targets was Bassel Khartabil, who launched Syria's CC community several years ago and began a project to take 3D scans of the city, which CC has been gathering and releasing under a CC0 Public Domain license. He was captured and imprisoned, and for the past five years his whereabouts and status have been unknown. As the #FreeBassel campaign continues, Creative Commons is now working to bring his invaluable scans to life in the form of 3D-printed replicas, starting with today's unveiling of the Tetrapylon — which was destroyed in January along with part of a Roman theatre after ISIS captured the city for a second time.
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    "The state of the commons is strong." The 2016 State of the Commons report, issued by Creative Commons this morning, does not begin with those words, but it could. The report shows an increase in adoption for the suite of licenses, but that is not the whole story.