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Monday, 19 Mar 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Red Hat, Chilean government hold talks on open source initiative Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 11:03am
Story IT teams are choosing open source - but not just for the cost savings Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:41am
Story Patent Troll Kills Open Source Project On Speeding Up The Computation Of Erasure Codes Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:39am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:19am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:18am
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 10:17am
Story Linux 3.18 Kernel: Not Much Change With Intel Haswell Performance Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 7:04am
Story Counterclockwise: Jolla, Nokia N1, Nexus and HTC One GPE Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 6:43am
Story Several Linux distros borrow Google’s Material Design ideas Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 6:38am
Story grep-2.21 released [stable] Rianne Schestowitz 24/11/2014 - 5:38am

Pardus -- ready for the major league

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Linux Pardus has been around for quite a while, but never got much attention, perhaps because its developers focus on giving people from Turkey a distribution in their native language. But Pardus is a multi-language distribution, so it can be used by many people without a Turkish background. Time to take a good look at this distro that might suprise you!

It Is A War

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OSS GNU is 25 years old this year, and every Linux user on the planet should take a few minutes to eat a piece of birthday cake and give thanks. Because it's more than just software. Glyn Moody addressed one aspect of this in "The Real Reason to Celebrate GNU's Birthday":

Shuttleworth’s Apollo Challenge to the Linux Community Mark Shuttleworth, founder of Ubuntu, recently wrote a post detailing a challenge he recently issued to the Linux and free software community: build a Linux-based UI and computing experience on par with Apple’s within two years. This is the free software community’s version of JFK’s Space Challenge that resulted in the Apollo program.

What They're Using: Michael Anti and His Eee PC Michael Anti is an engineer and journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, Huaxia Times, 21st Century World Herald, Washington Post, Southern Metropolis Daily and Far and Wide Journal. He has been a researcher, a columnist, a reporter, a war correspondent in Baghdad (in 2003) and more—and achieved notoriety in 2005 when Microsoft deleted his blog.

IP camera designs run Linux

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Linux TI is offering Linux camera application source code and free codecs with two new IP camera reference designs based on its RISC/DSP SoCs. The Wide Dynamic Range (WDR) model handles widely variable lighting, while a Video Content Analytics (VCA) model targets video analytics processing applications.

Desktop Linux and Subnotebooks/Netbooks

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pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Desktop Linux has made inroads even to subnotebooks/netbooks. And all the leading desktop distros such as Ubuntu, Suse, PCLinuxOS, Fedora, Xandros, Mandriva and many others have rolled out their distro versions to fit these low-cost devices. The good news is that PCLinuxOS has also forayed into this area with its EePCLinuxOS.

Also: Netbooks and Mini-Laptops Buyer's Guide

Is HP building a custom Linux distro for home computers?

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Linux Business Week reports that sources inside HP claim the company is readying a custom operating system based on Linux for home computer users. There are practically no details about the rumored OS at this point, aside from the fact that it's supposed to be "easier" to use than most Linux distributions.

Lancelot reaches Holy Grail of KDE menu

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KDE KDE 4 is barely eight months old, and already it has three options for a main menu. Until now, users have either used the default Kickoff, which makes for awkward navigation of the menu tree, or reverted to the familiar but unwieldy classic menu. Now, with the first full release of Lancelot, users have another option.

Novell Turns Inside To Hire Its New Channel Chief

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SUSE Novell has named Javier Colado, previously manager of the software company's Europe, Middle East and Africa operations, as its new channel chief, the company announced Friday.

Hackers attack Large Hadron Collider

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Security Hackers have mounted an attack on the Large Hadron Collider, raising concerns about the security of the biggest experiment in the world as it passes an important new milestone.

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 38

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Issue #38 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out. In this week’s issue: Last Call for openSUSE Board Candidates, openSUSE 11.0 survey, and KDE in openSUSE 11.1 and beyond.

Does interoperability violate the GPL?

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OSS VMWare boxes from its logoI got an e-mail this morning, tickling me to look into the idea that VMWare is violating the GPL. This idea has been around for some time and Big Money Matt has covered it beautifully.

Make Your Linux Desktop More Productive

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HowTos Apple has convinced millions that they can make the switch from Windows to OS X, but those curious about Linux have to see for themselves if they can work or play on a free desktop. Today we're detailing a Linux desktop that helps you move quickly, work with Windows, and just get things done; read on for a few suggestions on setting it up.

Boxee aims to shake up the home theater

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Software Boxee is a new entrant into the increasingly crowded open source media center space. The company's eponymous application is billed as a "social media center" -- melding a smorgasbord of social networking services into an XBMC-based media center designed for the couch-centric user.

The 2008 kernel summit

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Jonathan Corbet: The agenda for the 2008 kernel summit has been posted. The summit is an annual, invitation-only event which is typically attended by 70-80 developers. It is a rare opportunity to bring part of the kernel community together for focused discussions on topics which affect the kernel as a whole.

Is Linux growing at Windows' or Unix's expense?

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Linux Windows may be king of data centers, but Linux has a foothold in nearly every courtyard and is sure to make further inroads in the year ahead.

Mozilla Colors

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bholley.wordpress: I’ve been working on getting Mozilla’s color management backend ready for the prime time. We’re finally turning it on in tonight’s nightly builds, so I thought I’d give a bit of background on the history of color management in Mozilla and on color management in general.

The open source principles of participation

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OSS One of the greatest and most destructive beliefs in the open source community is that "Because I'm not a programmer, I can't participate in an open source project." Let me be the first to tell you that if you believe that, you're wrong. Dead wrong.

opensuse adds Installation over serial line

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SUSE It’s now possible to install openSUSE if you only have a serial line (without additional tricks). Our graphical bootloader frontend used to ignore serial input. That’s now (starting with 11.1 beta1) changed.

Protecting your network with Strata Guard Free

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Software Being connected to the Internet means exposure to what the outside world has to offer -- including the undesirable elements. Every time you connect to the Internet, you're exposed to threats that can compromise your network's security. Although network security solutions have evolved in recent years, so have network attack techniques.

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Today in Techrights

Review: ArchMerge 6.4.1

The distribution I have been asked most frequently to cover so far in 2018 is ArchMerge, an Arch-based project which runs the Xfce desktop environment and can be installed using the Calamares system installer. If the description sounds familiar, it should, as this summary could equally well apply to Archman, SwagArch and one edition of the Revenge OS distribution. There are two main features which set ArchMerge apart from its close relatives. First, ArchMerge is available in two flavours. The full featured desktop edition ships with three graphical user interfaces (Xfce, Openbox and i3). A second, minimal flavour is available for people who want to start with a text console and build from the ground up. The other point which helps ArchMerge stand out from the crowd of Arch-based distributions is its documentation. Arch Linux is famous for its detailed wiki, and rightfully so. ArchMerge takes a slightly different approach and, instead of supplying detailed pages for virtually every aspect of the distribution, the project supplies quick overviews and tutorials for common tasks and issues. These overviews are each accompanied by a video which shows the user how to perform the task. The ArchMerge website places a strong emphasis on learning and the tutorial pages guide visitors through how to install the distribution, how to configure the desktop, how to install additional software and how to set up file synchronizing through Dropbox. There is also a section dedicated to fixing common problems, a sort of FAQ for distribution issues. Since there are videos for the topics covered, we are shown where to go and what each step should look like, rather than just being given a written description. Read more

today's howtos

Tails 3.6.1 is out

This release fixes several security issues and users should upgrade as soon as possible. Read more