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Wednesday, 22 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Blog entry Forgot your Ubuntu Password? All is not lost. fieldyweb 09/01/2013 - 9:43pm
Story Linux Mint 14 Is a Breath of Fresh Air srlinuxx 09/01/2013 - 8:46pm
Story Ultimate Edition 3.5 srlinuxx 09/01/2013 - 8:45pm
Story Stargazing with Open Source – Three FOSS apps srlinuxx 09/01/2013 - 8:41pm
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 09/01/2013 - 6:47pm
Story A look at XFCE in Debian Wheezy srlinuxx 09/01/2013 - 2:34am
Story Mini-interview with ROSA srlinuxx 09/01/2013 - 2:32am
Story what’s new in Firefox 18 srlinuxx 09/01/2013 - 1:21am
Forum topic MyahOS vorn213 09/01/2013 - 12:08am
Story Red Hat ships Enterprise Linux 5.9 srlinuxx 08/01/2013 - 10:50pm

Battle for Wesnoth is a ton of fun

Filed under
Gaming

linux.com: Battle for Wesnoth is an amazingly addictive 2-D turn-based strategy game with some role playing game elements thrown in for spice. It runs under Linux, Windows, and Mac OS X. Wesnoth can be played solo, using one of the several single-player adventures (campaigns) available, or over the Internet with other people.

Now it's Opera Tagging

Filed under
Software

At Opera we truly want to make the best browser. We would like to know which features you want us to add to make your Opera experience even better. We will be doing this using blog tagging.

Quick command line tip - find out information about your kernel

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: A nice short and sweet command line tip today and it’s to do with finding out information about the version of the kernel you’re running. You might be asked for this information if you are asking for help somewhere or you might be messing around with your kernel.

Wal-mart to offer low-cost Linux PC?

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: Wal-Mart will sell a sub-$300 "back-to-school" PC this fall pre-loaded with Microsoft Windows Vista and OpenOffice.org productivity software. The Everex GC3502 PC is based on a 1.7GHz Via C7-D processor, and will be available later this year preloaded with Ubuntu Linux.

Ubuntu Live and OSCON: Open-Source Software Heads Northwes

Filed under
Ubuntu

wired blogs: There are two big open-source software gatherings happening over the next week, as both Ubuntu Live and O'Reilly OSCON descend upon the Oregon Convention Center in Portland (which even has a moat!).

Debian Software RAID Setup

Filed under
Software

junocake: The initial plan was to create a RAID-0 array (striping for performance), re-install Debian, copy all data, and remove the older drives for noise and heat reasons. With two of them PATA drives, they could stay in the system easily copy straight to the new array.

Freespire, Linspire, and Microsoft patents

Filed under
OS

desktoplinux: On July 5, Microsoft quietly released a "Covenant to Customers" to clear up how it is handling its patent deal with Linux distributor Linspire. Instead, it did little but puzzle and annoy members of the Linux community.

Pupils browse porn on donated laptops

Filed under
OLPC

Reuters: Nigerian schoolchildren who received laptops from a U.S. aid organization have used them to explore pornographic sites on the Internet.

Feedback on Ubuntu 7.10 training course.

Filed under
Ubuntu

jono bacon: One of the services that Canonical are working to offer are high quality training courses. These courses are produced by our training team and executed around the world by training partners.

Schedule Tasks Using Gnome-schedule (A cron & at GUI) in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

ubuntugeek: Gnome-schedule is a grapichal user interface to ‘crontab’ and ‘at’, both used to schedule tasks. It supports periodical tasks and tasks that happens once in the future. It is written in python using pygtk. Gnome-schedule also supports titles and icons for your tasks so that they are more easily to keep track of.

Fighting OOXML

freesoftware mag blogs: The normally boring world of international standards has turned into a bloody fist fight between the most brutal monopolist of modern times, and the Community. Just the name, “Office Open XML” makes my head spin.

Review: ELive 1.0

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

the distrogue: I've always found the Enlightenment desktop fascinating. Maybe it has something to do with all the shiny. It's a great balance of eye-candy and performance, and with a little tweaking, can be turned into an awesome desktop system. That's what ELive is.

Linux: lguest Merged

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: Rusty Russell's lguest was recently merged into the upcoming 2.6.23 Linux kernel. The merge comment describes the project, "lguest is a simple hypervisor for Linux on Linux. Unlike kvm it doesn't need VT/SVM hardware. Unlike Xen it's simply 'modprobe and go'.

Desktops and Windows Managers - Part 4 - JWM

Raiden's Realm: JWM (Joe's Window Manager) is a very lightweight window manager for use with X windows under Linux or Unix. My compiled version weighs in at 138KBytes in size, not the dozens of megabytes like KDE or GNOME. If you are looking for a simple kiosk system interface or a lightweight desktop for a dedicated server, then JWM should fit the bill nicely.

Editing basics for the xorg.conf file

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: For many users, the xorg.conf file, which configures the system resources, graphics card, keyboard, pointing device, and monitor for a computer running the X Window System, is an exception to GNU/Linux's do-it-yourself credo. Users who think nothing of editing /etc/fstab or /etc/hosts.allow will shy away from xorg.conf for fear of breaking their systems, relying instead on tools such as the KDE Control Center or Debian's dpkg-reconfigure xserver-xorg instead. But learning your way around xorg.conf not only teaches you a lot about how your system operates -- it can also come in handy when the graphical display fails.

GPLv3, the dishonorable suicide

Filed under
OSS

beranger: RMS will not save the world - he has just killed the FLOSS, actually. We have already started to hear about strange license lockups...

Emacs editing: Options, registers, and bookmarks

Filed under
News

Take charge of your editing session within Emacs and use it to your advantage. This tutorial is the fourth in a series, and shows you three areas of Emacs that control some aspect of the editing session: various command-line options, the register, and bookmark facilities for setting and saving positions and data.

2008: The Year for the Linux Desktop?

Filed under
Linux

osweekly: As my week progresses, I'm seeing entirely too many utopia articles, such as this one. And while much of the article is spot on, especially with those who would rather play in traffic that use Vista, the problem of wireless Internet connectivity and popular media codecs very much remains in disarray.

Linux: Formatting Merge Requests

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: In response to a recent merge request, Linus Torvalds explained how he preferred the request to be formatted, "please don't hide the branch name in the free-flowing text".

What's the Story Behind Apache?

Filed under
Software

linux journal: Most people in the free software world know two things about Apache. The first is that its name derives from the fact that it was a “a patchy server”, built out of patches to the earlier NCSA HTTPd Web server. The other is that in terms of market share, Apache knocks Microsoft's IIS into a cocked hat. Unfortunately, neither of these statements is true.

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Ten Years as Desktop Linux User: My Open Source World, Then and Now

I've been a regular desktop Linux user for just about a decade now. What has changed in that time? Keep reading for a look back at all the ways that desktop Linux has become easier to use -- and those in which it has become more difficult -- over the past ten years. I installed Linux to my laptop for the first time in the summer of 2006. I started with SUSE, then moved onto Mandriva and finally settled on Fedora Core. By early 2007 I was using Fedora full time. There was no more Windows partition on my laptop. When I ran into problems or incompatibilities with Linux, my options were to sink or swim. There was no Windows to revert back to. Read more