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Wednesday, 29 Mar 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Adventures in Ubuntu: Downloading & Installing Software

Filed under
HowTos

lo-fi-librarian.co.uk: Installing stuff with Ubuntu is a very different experience. Ubuntu comes with stacks of applications ready to use, but there is likely to be other stuff you want to run.

The Four Freedoms Applied to Hardware

Filed under
Hardware

linuxdevcenter: The Free Software Foundation has defined Four Freedoms related to software. These freedoms apply to users of software, not necessarily developers. In the view of the FSF, these freedoms are ethical in nature, so much so that they argue that software which violates these freedoms is unethical.

Ubuntu: Enlightenment 17

Filed under
Software

geek00l.blogspot: I have been toying with enlightenment DR17, just like fluxbox there's no so called "stable release" and it is still in pre-alpha stage, if you know about enlightenment, DR17 is completely rewrite.

Avant Window Navigator

Filed under
Software

FOSSwire: There are many different Dock-like launchers available for Linux these days, some of them better than others. One such program is Avant Window Navigator. It bills itself as a dock-like bar which sits at the bottom of the screen tracking open windows.

Three MythTV Linux distros compared

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: My Series 1 TiVo is getting old, so I am planning an escape route based on MythTV, a free software system that turns an old computer into a personal video recorder. This week I tested three MythTV-specific Linux distributions: KnoppMyth, MythDora, and MythBuntu.

what's new with compiz fusion

Filed under
Software

smspillaz.wordpress.com: We’ve made some exciting progress this week in bugs, features and the website. Just to get this out of the way, it is now safe to upgrade Compiz Fusion.

GPLv3 Myth #4: GPLv3 undercuts the Microsoft/Novell deal

Filed under
OSS

zdnet blogs: In part 4 of a 5 part series on the new version of the most commonly used free/open source license, today we take a look at one of the reasons it took so long to create–the Microsoft/Novell patent deal.

People of openSUSE: Andreas Jaeger

Filed under
Interviews
SUSE

opensuse.news: Today we present the interview with Andreas Jaeger, Director Platform/openSUSE and also the very first person who came up with the idea to launch the project ‘People of openSUSE’.

The invisible desktop

Filed under
Linux

manilastandardtoday.com: IF you go by what the mainstream press reports, you’d think there were only two computer desktop operating systems in the world—Windows and Mac. This notion would be most unfortunate because it might keep you or your company from exploring Linux.

today's leftover links

Filed under
News
  • AWN Manager and Themes

  • How hypervisors can defeat GPLv3's "anti-tivoization"
  • Linux and real-time Java power German traffic lights
  • Ekiga: The “Duh” VOIP/SIP Software
  • XGI driver 1.5.0 release
  • Linux: Sanitizing block_device_operations
  • Judge sides with RIAA: file sharing apps lead to direct infringement
  • TorrentSpy shuts down in the U.S.

Two open source email virus scanners for Linux

Filed under
Software

linux.com: If Linux is hardly affected by viruses, why do system administrators use anti-virus software on their Linux email servers? Because an anti-virus scanner on a mail server can serve as another level of defense for Microsoft Windows desktop users. Linux provides several server-based anti-virus applications.

OpenBSD: Software Freedom

Filed under
BSD

kernelTRAP: OpenBSD creator Theo de Raadt highlighted a recent commit to the NetBSD source tree saying, "if anyone had any doubt that our insistence on freedom was important, just read this."

Pencils Down for KOffice Summer of Code Students!

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: With an avalanche of last-minute commits, the KOffice Google Summer of Code students finished yet another great Summer of Code. We had some very exciting projects this year, and most of them were as great a success as last year.

Some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • screenshot and snapshot creations howtos

  • Setting up a FreeBSD File and Fetching Mail Server
  • Making Your Microsoft Office Templates Available in OpenOffice.org or StarOffice
  • Keeping Opera bookmarks in sync with oSync
  • How do I see the current configuration of a running Xen domain?
  • Dell BIOS firmware updates on Debian
  • Transparent Terminal on your Desktop

I’m LOVING Vector Linux!

Filed under
Linux

tuxtoday: So I had some issues getting USB-drives to work in both SUSE and Ubuntu.I actually had HUGE issues! So, in the search for another distro, someone on IRC recommended Vector Linux.

Meet Linux Genuine Advantage

Filed under
Linux
Humor

p2pnet: Are you a Linux user who’s feeling disadvantaged, ignored and unloved because you don’t have Microsoft’s Windows Genuine Advantage looking out for you? Be troubled no more.

Feisty in wireless land

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire: Recently I've been reading a lot about how well Ubuntu works on laptops, particularly when it comes to handling wireless connections - something that is generally a problem under Linux due to a number of factors, the primary one being the paucity of drivers for most cards.

Linux administration will become GUI

Filed under
Linux

The Open Source Advocate: I am confident that the future of Linux server administration will rely less on the command line, and that most server admins will use a GUI interface. To understand why this will happen, lets take a look at the success of Windows servers.

Becoming a Linux OEM: A Roadmap

Filed under
Linux

itmanagement.earthweb.com: Dell dropped their hat into the ring, perhaps prompting what could become a rush of other PC manufacturers and distributors wishing to enter into OEM deals with various Linux distributions. There have been a number of smaller companies that have worked within the Linux space for some time now.

Three flavours of Open Source distros reviewed

Filed under
Linux

the inquirer: FROM THE FLAMES, some of you seem to be a bit interested in the new open sauce flavours floating around. One more go at the sauces, and we will see if you like it. The three victims for this round of testing are Arklinux 2007.1, Damn Small Linux 4.0, and Sabayon Linux 3.4.

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Games and Emulation

Linux Devices

Koozali SME Server 8.2 Reaches End of Life on March 31, Upgrade to Koozali SME 9

Koozali Foundation, through Terry Fage, announced the availability of a final set of updates for the Koozali SME Server 8.2 operating system, which will reach end of life this week. Patching some of the reported bugs, the new packages released today for Koozali SME Server 8.2 are e-smith-ibays-2.2.0-16.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, e-smith-manager-2.2.0-14.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-clamav-2.2.0-15.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, smeserver-locale-*-2.2.0-56.el5.sme.noarch.rpm, and smeserver-yum-2.2.0-26.el5.sme.noarch.rpm. Read more

Development News

  • GCC for New Contributors
    I’m a relative newcomer to GCC, so I thought it was worth documenting some of the hurdles I ran into when I started working on GCC, to try to make it easier for others to start hacking on GCC. Hence this guide.
  • #1: Easy Package Registration
    Last month, Brian Ripley announced on r-devel that registration of routines would now be tested for by R CMD check in r-devel (which by next month will become R 3.4.0). A NOTE will be issued now, this will presumably turn into a WARNING at some point. Writing R Extensions has an updated introduction) of the topic.
  • Emacs as C IDE and JHBuild
    Although Builder clearly is The Future as GNOME IDE, I still all my coding in Emacs, mostly because I have been using it for such a long time that my brain is to all the shortcuts and workflows. But Emacs can be a good IDE too. The most obvious everyday features that I want from an IDE are good source code navigation and active assistance while editing. In the first category are tasks like jumping to symbol's definition, find all callers of a function and such things. For editing, auto-completion, immediate warnings and error reporting, semantic-aware re-factoring are a must. Specifically for GNOME related development, I need all this to also work with JHBuild.