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About Tux Machines

Tuesday, 22 May 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Working with multimedia files - Part 2

  • Dynamic Theming in Drupal 6 - Part 1
  • Ubuntu: Try KDE 4.2 Now
  • OpenOffice, JDBC and MySQL
  • UsplashSmooth : Time Based Usplash for smoother bootup bar
  • How to customise the Acer Aspire One GUI
  • BPF for IP or VLAN Traffic
  • Password Protect Your GRUB Bootloader
  • Installing Ruby on Rails in Linux
  • Enabling Automatic Login on Ubuntu
  • Compiz on openSUSE 11.1
  • Acer 5315 AR242x wireless
  • Tips For Documentation Writers

The 2008 Ovatio Awards, by Ars Technica: Distro(s) of the Year

Filed under
Linux

arstechnica.com: The Linux distro landscape is always evolving, and virtually all of the mainstream distros have made significant progress this year. After careful consideration, we decided to give the Ovatio for Distro of the Year to two distributions that we think are particularly deserving.

Novell’s Financial Results: SUSE Linux And Three Other Facts

Filed under
SUSE
  • Novell’s Financial Results: SUSE Linux And Three Other Facts

  • ARSes crush Novell profits
  • Novell grooms NetWare-Linux lovechild

Peek at Opera 10 Alpha

Filed under
Software
  • Peek at Opera 10 Alpha

  • Opera 10 alpha: Compliant and faster--but not fastest
  • Opera 10.0 alpha 1 is impressive, but does it stand a chance against Firefox?
  • Sneak Peek: Opera 10 Browser

PCLinuxOS 2009 Beta 2 Released

Filed under
PCLOS

The second public beta release of PCLinuxOS 2009 is out and ready for testing: "The Ripper Gang is pleased to announce the second public beta ISO release of what will ultimately become PCLinuxOS 2009. This beta features Linux kernel 2.6.26.8, KDE 3.5.10, OpenOffice.org 2.4.1, Firefox 3.0.4, Thunderbird 2.0.0.17, Frostwire, KTorrent, Amarok, Flash, Java JRE, Compiz Fusion 3D and much more.

Will a Linux Certification Help You Get a Linux Job?

Filed under
Linux

linuxplanet.com: Will a Linux certification help you get a Linux job? The answer is: "Probably." There are a host of Linux certifications. Each are meant to show that those who have them are Linux professionals of one level or another. How much help are they though when it comes from turning your Linux expertise into a Linux job?

Go-OO: The best office suite you never knew you used

Filed under
Software
OOo

linux.com: If you run Ubuntu, openSUSE, Debian, or Mandriva, among other distributions, then whenever you run OpenOffice.org you don't run the "official" version, but rather Go-OO, an office suite based on the OpenOffice.org source code.

Python 3.0 appears, strangles 2.x compatibility

Filed under
Software

theregister.co.uk: Python 3.0 is out now. The latest version makes some major changes to the popular programming language, and it's incompatible with version 2.x releases.

Open Source and Free Puppies

Filed under
OSS

buytaert.net: Seth Gottlieb reported that Annie Weinberger of Interwoven, a proprietary CMS vendor, launched some good old Open Source FUD comparing Open Source to a free puppy. Puppy analogies -- especially those with free puppies -- are powerful stuff.

The Mozilla Community Store is here!

Filed under
Moz/FF
Web

blog.mozilla.com: This morning we announced the launch of the Mozilla Community Store, a new open source approach to our t-shirt creation process that allows anyone to submit their original designs and make them publicly available for purchase.

Hands-on: OpenSolaris 2008.11 a major step forward for Sun

Filed under
OS

arstechnica.com: The OpenSolaris development community launched version 2008.11, its second release ever, Wednesday. It's still not capable of replacing Linux on the desktop, but it shows promise.

Fedora 10: A Mini Review

Filed under
Linux

bobbo.me.uk: I have used Ubuntu exclusively for almost 2 years now. In that time I have very rarely had contact with other distros. But with the release of both Fedora 10 and VMWare 6.5, what better time is there to check out the latest release from the Fedora team?

The five stages of community open source engagement

Filed under
OSS

blogs.the451group: I wrote recently that the “five ages of vendor-led open source revenue strategies” I’d come up with wasn’t suitable for vendors that build a business around community-led projects.

Damn Small Linux 4.4.10 review

Filed under
Linux

itreviews.co.uk: As part of a survival toolkit, Damn Small Linux could be something of a saviour. Earlier this year, this writer used a previous release of the distribution to excise a couple of gigabytes of files from an otherwise-locked-down Vista installation.

Open source is dying -- or maybe it isn't

Filed under
OSS

Bill Snyder: Put three geeks in a room and it won't take long to start an argument. Well, analyst Dennis Byron, veteran open-source exec Stuart Cohen, and ex-Microsoft developer Keith Curtis weren't exactly in the same room, but all three have provocative opinions about the future of software in general and of open source in particular.

10 common mistakes made by Linux users

Filed under
Linux

brajeshwar.com: There are a few ubiquitous mistakes which a lot of Linux admins make while administering a Linux box. If kept in mind, these mistakes can be avoided to keep a smooth work flow.

The LXF Benchmark: Desktop environments

Filed under
Software

linuxformat.co.uk: Which Linux/Unix desktop environment will make you work and play faster? Marco Fioretti gets benchmarking to find out what's leading the pack, and what needs to go on a diet. On the scales: Gnome, KDE and Xfce, along with their file managers, terminals and text editors...

Open source does not need new buzzwords

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: At Springsource’s winter getaway this week, Forrester Research vice president John Rymer coined a clever new term to make the open source argument.

Quickly share your screenshots with JShot

Filed under
Software

linux.com: With the JShot screen capture and uploader utility, you can quickly put all or part of your screen on the Web and send a URL to it to a friend. JShot is free for noncommercial use, and is great when you want to show people a screen capture and don't want to have to deal with file names and upload permissions.

Opera 10 alpha claims Acid3 perfection

Filed under
Software

news.cnet.com: Thirteen-year-old Opera has been the perennial underdog in the browser wars, but Opera 10 alpha brings some unexpected firepower to the field. Unlike any other browser on the market, Opera 10 will comply fully with the Acid3 test.

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Software: Grafana, Heaptrack, Vim

  • Grafana – An Open Source Software for Analytics and Monitoring
    Grafana is an open source, feature rich, powerful, elegant and highly-extensible analytics and monitoring software that runs on Linux, Windows and MacOS. It is a de facto software for data analytics, being used at Stack Overflow, eBay, PayPal, Uber and Digital Ocean – just to mention but a few. It supports 30+ open source as well as commercial databases/data sources including MySQL, PostgreSQL, Graphite, Elasticsearch, OpenTSDB, Prometheus and InfluxDB. It allows you to dig deeply into large volumes of real-time, operational data; visualize, query, set alerts and get insights from your metrics from differen
  • Heaptrack v1.1.0 release
    Better memory profiling on Linux After more than a year of work, I’m pleased to release another version of heaptrack, the Linux memory profiler! The new version 1.1.0 comes with some new features, significant performance improvements and – most importantly – much improved stability and correctness. If you have tried version v1.0 in the past and encountered problems, update to the new v1.1 and try again!
  • Ten Years of Vim
     

    The philosophy behind Vim takes a while to sink in: While other editors focus on writing as the central part of working with text, Vim thinks it's editing.

     

    You see, most of the time I don't spend writing new text; instead, I edit existing text.

  •  

GNU/Linux: Parrot 4.0, Oregan, Containers and Linux 4.18 Plans

  • Parrot 4.0 is out
    Parrot 4.0 has been released. Parrot is a security-oriented distribution aimed at penetration tests and digital forensics analysis, with additional tools to preserve privacy.
  • Parrot 4.0 release notes
  • Oregan launches SparQ middleware for Linux and Android TV
    Oregan said that the open standards-based offering resolves the differences between the current security and performance requirements of modern-day TV services and the hardware capabilities of STBs that were deployed up to a decade ago.
  • Linux app support coming to older Chrome OS devices
    Linux apps on Chrome OS is one of the biggest developments for the OS since Android apps. Previous reports stated Chromebooks with certain kernel versions would be left in the dust, but the Chrome OS developers have older devices on the roadmap, too. When Google first broke silence on Linux app functionality, it was understood that Linux kernel 4.4 was required to run apps due to dependencies on newer kernel modules. Thanks to an issue found on Chromium’s public bugtracker, we have confirmation that containers won’t be limited to the handful of Chrome OS devices released with kernel 4.4.
  • Looking Ahead To The Linux 4.18 Kernel
    There still are several weeks to go until the Linux 4.17 kernel will be officially released and for that to initiate the Linux 4.18 merge window, but we already know some of the features coming to this next kernel cycle as well as an idea for some other work that may potentially land.

Red Hat and Fedora Leftovers