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Sunday, 24 Jun 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Software freedom Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 5:26pm
Story today's releases and howtos Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 5:07pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 5:06pm
Story Leftovers: Screenshots Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 5:05pm
Story Android Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 5:02pm
Story Leveraging the power of academia in your open source project Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 4:52pm
Story Tails 1.3.1 Is an Emergency Release to Patch Critical Security Issues in Tor Browser Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 4:50pm
Story Ten years of Kubuntu Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 4:47pm
Story Neptune 4.3 available Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 4:43pm
Story Apparently, Ubuntu Doesn’t Need Blu-ray Burning Support Roy Schestowitz 23/03/2015 - 4:32pm

2008, the Buzzwords that were

Filed under
OSS

brajeshwar.com: The common buzzwords heard in the year 2008 were recession, credit-crunch, bankruptcy, bailout and others related to the financial markets as it was a year when the global economy faced huge downturn. Amidst this economic meltdown, Linux was another buzz.

Forrester: Netbooks confuse consumers

Filed under
Hardware

computerworlduk.com: Netbooks fill an important niche in the consumer PC market, but the way they are being marketed is causing confusion with consumers, says a Forrester analyst.

Unix Wanes While Linux Waxes

Filed under
Linux

daniweb.com: In a recent report by ComputerWorld, Unix is losing major ground in the SAP data center space. And in the time period (roughly 2.5 years) between October 2005 through March 2008, Unix to Linux conversions almost doubled over the previous evaluation period (2001 - September 2005).

openSUSE Weekly News, Issue 55

Filed under
SUSE

Issue #55 of openSUSE Weekly News is now out! In this week’s issue: openSUSE Project Opens Feature Tracking with openFATE, openSUSE forums has reached 20K members, and Wanted-Build Service Contributors.

7 Reasons Why I Stopped Using Ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu

unfq.com: I have been using Ubuntu Linux as my main operating system for the past three years. That began to change a few months ago and a couple of weeks ago, I finally made the switch over to Windows Vista. So why did I drop Ubuntu Linux?

Move over GNOME, Ubuntu Mobile looks at Qt, other desktop environments

Filed under
Ubuntu

techworld.com.au: The Ubuntu Mobile operating system is undergoing its most radical change with a port to the ARM processor for Internet devices and netbooks, and may use Nokia's LGPL Qt development environment as an alternative to GNOME.

The best Ubuntu video editors

A list of the best 8 Ubuntu video editors (install instructions for Ubuntu, they work on any linux distro). Best Ubuntu video editors full article

The best three Linux introductions for beginners

Filed under
Linux

blogs.computerworld: From where I sit, a new Linux user needs a Linux that's close enough to the desktop they already know-almost always Windows-so they can quickly start using it. The easiest way to start is to buy a PC that already has Linux installed on it.

Linux Elitism: It’s a Fact

Filed under
Linux

jehurst.wordpress: I use Linux. It’s the best there is, particularly for the way I work. What I know is the folks behind Linux are quite elitist in at least one sense of the word: They are only interested in dealing with their own kind, and have no interest in what most computer users want.

The facts behind Microsoft's anti-Linux 'Get the Facts' campaign

Filed under
Linux
Microsoft

news.cnet.com: Back in 2002, Jim Allchin was co-president of Microsoft's Platforms and Services Division and was, in his own words, "scared" of the momentum behind Linux, as noted in an email [PDF] sent to several of his direct reports.

Once You Go Linux, You Never Go Back

Filed under
Linux

linuxhaxor.net: What’s with all the talks about windows 7 being a Linux Killer? A long time Linux user has very little to no reason to “switch” to Windows from Linux. Unless of course you are a recreational Linux user who occasionally tries out Linux in the form of virtual install or a separate partition. To understand why this is so, you have to understand why people use Linux.

Camp KDE Takes off in Jamaica

Filed under
KDE

dot.kde.org: In a warm Jamaica around thirty KDE developers have gathered for the first Camp KDE. The following article is an impression of the first days of this event, a short summary of what is going on here.

Why games are NOT the key to Linux adoption

Filed under
Linux

freesoftwaremagazine.com: I have a number of concerns about a recent article about games [as] the key top Linux adoption. It nearly screams for scrutiny, as a it presents opinions and broad stereotypes as fact, contradicts itself and makes conclusions that have the capacity to hurt, not help the community.

Review: Fedora 10

Filed under
Linux

headshotgamer.com: I've previously reviewed Fedora 10 Beta and I liked what I saw, though was a bit jaded by the difficulties in setting up proprietary drivers. Much time has passed and Fedora 10 (final) was released on the 25th of November, 2008 – more than enough time for polish to be added and a hundred or so updates to fix the more obvious bugs.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 286

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Feature: Arch Linux in review

  • News: openSUSE calls for build contributors, Fedora focuses on artwork, Debian runs on Android, Singapore Airlines switches to Red Hat, Ubuntu on restricted software, mini distros, Gentopia
  • Released last week: ALT Linux 4.1.1 "Desktop", CrunchBang Linux 8.10.02, FreeNAS 0.69
  • Upcoming releases: Pardus Linux 2008.2 RC2
  • New additions: PureOS
  • New distribution: Amahi, Galinux, Icadyptes, SOAD Linux
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

An Open Office Test Drive

Filed under
OOo

jdeeth.blogspot: For the next couple of Linux Monday posts, I'll be testing out my legacy Microsoft Office files in Open Office, Linux world's main alternative. This is, by necessity, a one-way test.

The status of Sugar, post-OLPC

Filed under
Linux

morgancollett.wordpress: The recent layoffs of almost the entire OLPC software development team have been widely circulated, but not the implications for Sugar. Here’s where the Sugar project stands:

TechCrunch's prototype CrunchPad runs Ubuntu

Filed under
Hardware

heise-online.co.uk: TechCrunch have shown a working prototype of the CrunchPad running Ubuntu Linux. Last July, Michael Arrington grew tired of waiting for a $200 web tablet and announced that he had decided to work on making such a device a reality.

LCA2009: Microsoft man encounters Linux storm

Filed under
Linux

itwire.com: If Lawrence Crumpton had any inkling about the kind of storm he would face while giving a talk at the Australian national Linux conference in Hobart today, one doubts he would have come along.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

KDE: Qt, Plasma, QML, Usability & Productivity

  • Qt 5.11.1 and Plasma 5.13.1 in ktown ‘testing’ repository
    A couple of days ago I recompiled ‘poppler’ and the packages in ‘ktown’ that depend on it, and uploaded them into the repository as promised in my previous post. I did that because Slackware-current updated its own poppler package and mine needs to be kept in sync to prevent breakage in other parts of your Slackware computer. I hear you wonder, what is the difference between the Slackware poppler package and this ‘ktown’ package? Simple: my ‘poppler’ package contains support for Qt5 (in addition to the QT4 support in the original package) and that is required by other packages in the ‘ktown’ repository.
  • Sixth week of coding phase, GSoC'18
    The Menus API enables the QML Plugin to add an action, separator or menu to the WebView context menu. This API is not similar to the WebExtensions Menus API but is rather Falkonish!
  • This week in Usability & Productivity, part 24
    See all the names of people who worked hard to make the computing world a better place? That could be you next week! Getting involved isn’t all that tough, and there’s lots of support available.

Programming: Python Maths Tools and Java SE

  • Essential Free Python Maths Tools
    Python is a very popular general purpose programming language — with good reason. It’s object oriented, semantically structured, extremely versatile, and well supported. Scientists favour Python because it’s easy to use and learn, offers a good set of built-in features, and is highly extensible. Python’s readability makes it an excellent first programming language. The Python Standard Library (PSL) is the the standard library that’s distributed with Python. The library comes with, among other things, modules that carry out many mathematical operations. The math module is one of the core modules in PSL which performs mathematical operations. The module gives access to the underlying C library functions for floating point math.
  • Oracle's new Java SE subs: Code and support for $25/processor/month
    Oracle’s put a price on Java SE and support: $25 per processor per month, and $2.50 per user per month on the desktop, or less if you buy lots for a long time. Big Red’s called this a Java SE Subscription and pitched it as “a commonly used model, popular with Linux distributions”. The company also reckons the new deal is better than a perpetual licence, because they involve “an up-front cost plus additional annual support and maintenance fees.”

Linux 4.18 RC2 Released From China

  • Linux 4.18-rc2
    Another week, another -rc. I'm still traveling - now in China - but at least I'm doing this rc Sunday _evening_ local time rather than _morning_. And next rc I'll be back home and over rmy jetlag (knock wood) so everything should be back to the traditional schedule. Anyway, it's early in the rc series yet, but things look fairly normal. About a third of the patch is drivers (drm and s390 stand out, but here's networking and block updates too, and misc noise all over). We also had some of the core dma files move from drivers/base/dma-* (and lib/dma-*) to kernel/dma/*. We sometimes do code movement (and other "renaming" things) after the merge window simply because it tends to be less disruptive that way. Another 20% is under "tools" - mainly due to some selftest updates for rseq, but there's some turbostat and perf tooling work too. We also had some noticeable filesystem updates, particularly to cifs. I'm going to point those out, because some of them probably shouldn't have been in rc2. They were "fixes" not in the "regressions" sense, but in the "missing features" sense. So please, people, the "fixes" during the rc series really should be things that are _regressions_. If it used to work, and it no longer does, then fixing that is a good and proper fix. Or if something oopses or has a security implication, then the fix for that is a real fix. But if it's something that has never worked, even if it "fixes" some behavior, then it's new development, and that should come in during the merge window. Just because you think it's a "fix" doesn't mean that it really is one, at least in the "during the rc series" sense. Anyway, with that small rant out of the way, the rest is mostly arch updates (x86, powerpc, arm64, mips), and core networking. Go forth and test. Things look fairly sane, it's not really all that scary. Shortlog appended for people who want to scan through what changed. Linus
  • Linux 4.18-rc2 Released With A Normal Week's Worth Of Changes
    Due to traveling in China, Linus Torvalds has released the Linux 4.18-rc2 kernel a half-day ahead of schedule, but overall things are looking good for Linux 4.18.