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Sunday, 28 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Fedora IPv6 Test Day tomorrow AdamW 08/06/2011 - 2:49am
Story Linux Sound & Music At Virginia Tech srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 2:12am
Story A use for EFI srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 2:10am
Story Open source identity: FreeNAS 8's Josh Paetzel srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 2:08am
Story Windows killed my laptop, again srlinuxx 07/06/2011 - 11:52pm
Story How's the Linux Desktop Doing? srlinuxx 07/06/2011 - 10:51pm
Story How GNU Free Call differs srlinuxx 07/06/2011 - 9:03pm
Story Strip mining of OpenOffice.org srlinuxx 07/06/2011 - 9:02pm
Story Time to vote on the openSUSE Strategy srlinuxx 07/06/2011 - 9:00pm
Story Science and KDE - Interview with KtikZ Developers srlinuxx 07/06/2011 - 7:04pm

Software installation on Linux: Tomorrow, it won’t (part 2)

Filed under
Linux

Many third parties have built their businesses around proprietary software, and we can’t just ignore them. And “ecosystem” implies decentralized, which I argued in part 1 was a key tenet of open source development anyway, i.e., this should be playing to one of our core strengths. So, if your “solution” is to tell ISVs (independent software vendors) to give us their source code so the distributions can include it because that’s just how we do things, you can safely skip the rest of the post.

Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 1)

Filed under
Reviews

My favorite distro faces an uncertain future, so I decided to install openSUSE 10.2 over it on my Compac Presario V2000. Also because... OK, I'll come clean: the real reason was for the eye candy. I wanted Beryl, with the cube, the wobbly windows, the "magic lantern" window minimizing effects, rain, snow -- you know, Eye Candy.

Ubuntu Edgy - 45 days later

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are few Linux users or potential users that haven't heard of UBUNTU. When it first released in September 2004, it promised an every six month release and was touted as “always free.” With two full production cycles annually, the latest in software is always at hand and to date, only once has the cycle not been met. That was due to the release of a product that would feature long term support.

'Twas the night before Christmas

Filed under
Humor

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house not a creature was stirring, just my USB mouse;

The wife and the children are all settled in bed, As I sit at my desk scratching my head.

What does 2007 hold for open source?

Filed under
OSS

I couldn't have an easier time playing fortune-teller this year. While some segments of the IT market might see the future as a wide-open plain, for the open source community, 2007 is shaping up to be a year for settling unfinished business.

Open Source Software is getting good - Are you falling behind?

Filed under
OSS

Open source software has historically been affiliated with minor or 'un-supported' software. Companies (in particular IT departments) have often turned down free, Open Source software alternatives in exchange for more costly, closed source applications because any number of the following commonly held beliefs.

SUSE co-founder returns to Novell

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE co-founder Hubert Mantel is back in the saddle at Novell. Back in November of 2005 when the well-respected chief maintainer of the SUSE Linux kernel left Novell, he said in an email announcing his resignation that "This is no longer the company I founded 13 years ago."

5 Advantages of using Linux over Windows

Filed under
Linux

So, your a new, or fairly moderate Linux user, who wants to know what the true advantages of using Linux over Windows are? There are several advantages, and of course, some disadvantages to using the Linux operating system. This article covers 5 advantages of using Linux over Windows, and lists a few disadvantages as well.

Linux blasts off in U.S. tactical satellite

Filed under
Sci/Tech

Linux was shot into space Dec. 16, as part of a second-phase Air Force Research Laboratory program aimed at making space more "operationally responsive." The TacSat-2 (tactical satellite) program aims to create "micro satellites" that can be launched quickly and cheaply, to support tactical military operations.

In Memory of Dr. Carl Sagan

Filed under
Misc

On December 20th, 2006 it will be 10 years since Carl Sagan passed away. He is remembered for many things, however what I’ll remember most about him was his pure love of spreading a love for science.

Beginners Guide to Linux Desktops

Filed under
Software

So you use Linux, but have you ever used a different desktop environment than the default? Surprisingly, there are too many to even count, but we are taking a look at a few of the most popular and explain advantages of each one.

Microsoft will drive Linux desktop adoption in 2007

Filed under
Linux

As part of a list of predictions for 2007, research firm IDC said Microsoft's client operating system anti-piracy efforts will backfire in 2007. Instead of stamping out software piracy, the campaign will drive customers toward a Linux desktop, said the Framingham, Mass.-based research firm.

Ryzom: a free MMORPG?

Filed under
Gaming

MMORPGs, or Massively Multiplayer Online Role-Playing Games, are fairly popular in the proprietary gaming world. Rather than playing a game all by yourself on a computer in your own dark room, you could be playing a game all by yourself on a computer in your own dark room---but against thousands of other people who play the same game on-line along with, or against, your character in the game, adding an intriguing social edge to the genre. Unfortunately, no such game currently exists in the free software world. Not yet, anyway.

Choosing Vendors: The Linux vs. Microsoft Red Herring

Filed under
OS

One of the difficulties is that there is so much bad blood between the groups that I often wonder if I’m writing about Israel and Palestine rather than technologies. There are lines that can be crossed that make it incredibly difficult to reach common ground because people just don’t forget some things that are said in anger.

GoboLinux : breath of fresh air?

Filed under
Linux

My very first reaction to GoboLinux was negative. The underlying idea of taming the Unix/Linux file system hierarchy with symbolic links isn't new: heck, SCO did that way back with their 3.2v4.0 release, and for exactly the same reasons. But.. you know, the more I read about GoboLinux, the less certain I became that this is a foolish Don Quixote effort.

Download of the day: Firefox 2.0.0.1 - Final Release Version

Filed under
Moz/FF

Yup, new build is out and you grab latest version from ftp server. Bugs fixed so far for Firefox 2.0.0.1: 83 in total; 42 crashers, 3 memory leaks, 41 regressions, and 4 privacy-related bugs.

2006: The year that changed Linux

Filed under
Linux

I've been saying for years that Linux was well along on its way from being the tech fanboy operating system of choice, to becoming one of big business' favorite operating systems. Well, I was right all along, but in 2006, that progress smacked many Linux fans in the face.

Weekly Debian Nubiles #6

Filed under
Linux
Humor

Did you ever get the feeling that maybe all of the adults have left the Debian project for greener pastures (ie Ubuntu)? When you read about developers deliberately sabotaging the release of Etch do you just think "Oh well, another candidate for the famous Linux Hissy-Fit Award" or do you possibly begin to wonder if this points to a deeper, darker, drearier and - notwithstanding my amazing powers of alliteration - way way dastardlier plot.

A survey of Linux file managers

Filed under
Software

Linux file manager ontogeny encapsulates the history of GNU/Linux. File managers began as command-line and generic graphical tools and progressed to desktop-specific ones, gaining sophistication along the way, with mouse controls, for example, replacing buttons. Today, the more than a dozen options highlighted here will suit users with widely varied interests.

Glipper will make GNOME much more usable

Filed under
Software

One key feature GNOME has lacked, in comparison to KDE, is a clipboard manager like KDE's Klipper. That's now about to change, thanks to the efforts of a project called "Glipper."

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More in Tux Machines

today's leftovers

Linux Development and LinuxCon

  • Linus Torvalds says GPL was defining factor in Linux's success
    Linus Torvalds and Dirk Hohndel, vice president and chief of open source at VMware, discussed the role that GNU GPL played in the success of Linux during a keynote conversation this week at LinuxCon NA in Toronto. Hohndel, who has been involved with the kernel for a very long time, said that during the past 25 years there have been many challenges, and one of the biggest challenges was the possibility of fragmentation. "How do we keep one single kernel?" he asked. "I used to be worried about fragmentation, and I used to think that it was inevitable at some point," said Torvalds. “Everyone was looking at the history of Linux and comparing it with UNIX. People would say that it’s going to fail because it's going to fragment. That's what happened before, so why even bother?" What made the difference was the license. "FSF [Free Software Foundation] and I don't have a loving relationship, but I love GPL v2," said Torvalds. "I really think the license has been one of the defining factors in the success of Linux because it enforced that you have to give back, which meant that the fragmentation has never been something that has been viable from a technical standpoint."
  • Making Use Of eBPF In The Mainline Linux Kernel
    One of the exciting innovations within the Linux kernel in the past few years has been extending the Berkeley Packet Filter (BPF) to become a more generalized in-kernel virtual machine. The eBPF work with recent versions of the Linux kernel allow it to be used by more than just networking so that these programs can be used for tracing, security, and more.
  • Linux turns 25 with a brilliant history
    Chances are, you use it every day. Linux runs every Android phone and tablet on Earth. And even if you’re on an iPhone or a Mac or a Windows machine, Linux is working behind the scenes, across the Internet, serving up most of the webpages you view and powering most of the apps you use. Facebook, Google, Pinterest, Wikipedia—it’s all running on Linux. Now, Linux is finding its way onto televisions, thermostats, and even cars. As software creeps into practically every aspect of our lives, so does the OS designed by Linus Torvalds.
  • Intel Lost Another Open-Source Driver Developer To Google Earlier This Summer
    There was another long-time Intel open-source Linux graphics driver developer that left the company earlier this summer and is now working at Google on the Chrome/Chromium OS graphics stack. Among the notable departures in the past few months from Intel's Open-Source Technology Center were Jesse Barnes, Wayland-founder Kristian Høgsberg, and Dirk Hohndel and apparently others that went under the radar or outside of our area of focus. Another graphics driver developer no longer at Intel is Chad Versace.
  • OpenGL ES 3.1 For Haswell Lands With Intel's Mesa Driver

today's howtos

Distro Development: Rescatux and Bodhi

  • Rescatux 0.40 beta 9 released
    Many code in the grub side and in the windows registry side has been rewritten so that these new features could be rewritten. As a consequence it will be easier to maintain Rescapp. Finally the chntpw based options which modify the Windows registry now perform a backup of the Windows registry files in the unlikely case you want to undo some of the changes that Rescapp performs. I guess that in the future there will be a feature to be able to restore such backups from Rescapp itself, but, let’s focus on releasing an stable release. It’s been a while since the last one. UEFI feedback is still welcome. Specially if the Debian installation disks work for you but not the Rescatux ones.
  • Bodhi 4.0.0 Updates and July Donation Totals
    Late last month I posted a first alpha look at Bodhi 4.0.0. Work since then has been coming along slowly due to a few unpredictable issues and my own work schedule outside of Bodhi being hectic over the summer. Bodhi 4.0.0 will be happening, but likely not with a stable release until September. I am traveling again this weekend, but am hoping to get out a full alpha release with 32bit and non-PAE discs next week.