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About Tux Machines

Sunday, 23 Apr 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The real problem blocking Linux support for apps and games srlinuxx 09/09/2013 - 10:08pm
Story Making the ultimate creative content OS from bits of Windows, Mac, and Linux srlinuxx 09/09/2013 - 10:07pm
Story Good Features For The Linux 3.12 Kernel srlinuxx 09/09/2013 - 10:05pm
Story Best KDE distro of 2013 srlinuxx 09/09/2013 - 10:04pm
Story Red Hat To Oracle: Have You Tried Free? srlinuxx 09/09/2013 - 10:00pm
Story DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 524 srlinuxx 09/09/2013 - 1:08pm
Story few more odds & ends: srlinuxx 08/09/2013 - 2:49am
Story some leftovers: srlinuxx 07/09/2013 - 3:17pm
Story some odds & ends: srlinuxx 06/09/2013 - 9:46pm
Blog entry Sometimes the Tech pres just gets it wrong.. fieldyweb 06/09/2013 - 7:44pm

Great Linux Sites for Developers

Filed under
Linux
Web

Linux Insider: What's a poor, lonely Linux developer to do? Where are all the good support sites? How am I going to fix that troublesome bug?

Regular expressions and search patterns

Filed under
HowTos

polishlinux: Every Unix system offers several useful commands for finding files and searching them for strings. Together with programming techniques such as streams, pipes, redirections, and regular expressions they comprise very powerful tools ideal for administrative tasks.

Firefox 3 alpha 8 released

Filed under
Moz/FF

arstechnica: Firefox 3 alpha 8 has officially been released and is now available for download. The last alpha release coincided with Gecko 1.9 freeze, and this release coincides with front-end feature freeze.

Unix fundamentals - compiling software from scratch

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Installing software. It’s something that you do quite a lot if you’re like most computer users. On Unix-like systems, there are several different ways you be getting that program however - it’s not necessarily a simple case of double-clicking one setup file. One of these ways is to download the program’s source code and compile it yourself.

Who's writing Linux?

Filed under
Linux

linuxworld: The Linux kernel project's "git" revision control tool offers up some numbers on which developers, and which companies, contributed the most code to Linux, and who's reviewing other people's code.

Tiny Linux Redux

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "Recently, the CE Linux forum has been working to revive the Linux-tiny project," stated Tim Bird on the Linux Kernel mailing list, adding that Michael Opdenacker has been selected as the project's new primary maintainer.

Also: Continued Atheros Discussions

knetworkmanager with TKIP/AES-CCMP support and GNOME 2.20

Filed under
Software

liquidat: A week ago Helmut Schaa submitted a set of changes to knetworkmanager. It now supports to chose the different security protocols used together with WPA. In other news the GNOME team released their desktop in the newest version, 2.20.

First U.S. GPL lawsuit filed

Filed under
Legal

linux-watch: Normally, GPL violations have been settled by letters from the FSF (Free Software Foundation) or other open-source organizations, pointing out the violation. For the first time in the U.S., a company, multimedia device and software vendor Monsoon Multimedia, is being taken to court for a GPL violation.

Linux: understanding it takes time

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Linux users tend to get all excited when a mainstream publication picks up any distribution and deems it worthy of review - even if the conclusions of the reviewer concerned turn out to be negative.

Printing Trends in Linux

Filed under
Linux

O'Reilly ONLamp: What technology has to work right out of the box, but requires cooperation among a dozen companies and even more independent developers? If you answered printing, you probably remember the tussles you've had with this technology on Linux or Unix systems.

Jury selection starts in trial of Han Reiser

Filed under
Reiser

mercurynews.com (AP): Lawyers on Wednesday began questioning potential jurors in the trial of a software engineer charged with killing his estranged wife, who went missing about a year ago.

NVIDIA 100.14.19 + 8800GTS 640MB

Filed under
Software

phoronix: This past Tuesday NVIDIA finally delivered an updated Linux and Solaris display driver (100.14.19). This new software release does, however, contain a number of fixes especially for the GeForce 8 series. We benchmarked a GeForce 8800GTS 640MB with the previous 100.14.11 display driver and then the new 100.14.19 driver release. The performance regression fix is very apparent!

Also: Black Window Bug Fixed?

Why Linux Is Already A Success

Filed under
Linux

Serdar Yegulalp: Anyone who reads InformationWeek regularly probably knows by now that my colleague Alexander Wolfe has more than a few pithy things to say about Linux with his piece 7 Reasons Why Linux Won’t Succeed on the Desktop. After reading it, I thought: Does Linux really need to succeed on the desktop? Maybe the truth is that Linux is already a success.

GNOME 2.20 shows significant improvement

Filed under
Software

linux.com: GNOME 2.20 was released yesterday. Even though I use GNOME regularly, I normally don't get excited over new releases. This time, though, GNOME has a solid list of new features and upgrades. It's worth taking a look at even if you aren't a fan of this desktop environment.

Also: Sneak Peeks at openSUSE 10.3: SUSE-Polished GNOME 2.20

What fun things can you do with Linux?

Filed under
Gaming

tuxtoday: So, you are thinking about installing Linux, but you’re a bit worried about getting bored? What about games? Good News! There are a lot of awesome games for Linux.

Divining from the Entrails of Ubuntu's Gutsy Gibbon

Filed under
Reviews
Ubuntu

datamation: According to the 2007 DesktopLinux.com survey, Ubuntu is the distribution of choice for 30% of GNU/Linux users. The exact figure is questionable, but Ubuntu's dominance is not. At times, I wondered whether the popularity might be preventing Ubuntu from finishing some rough edges.

KDE and Xorg, Fonts and DPI

Filed under
HowTos

yalb: Today, I’d like to share a tip I found out while working with a beta release for a distribution of Linux with KDE’s 3.5.7 version. So let’s take a look at how you can force KDE to run at the correct DPI for your monitor which will, in turn, make your fonts look MUCH better.

PC-BSD Day 15: PAMP your website

Filed under
BSD

ruminations: One application that always finds its way to my desktop is Apache-MySQL-PHP in one of its incarnations. MAMP for Mac OSX, XAMPP for Windows XP and my portable USB drive and LAMP for my Ubuntu box. In the latter case -and on *BSD- it shouldn’t be necessary to work with an *AMP package. Installing the various component via the software repositories or packages is a matter of entering the proper commands.

My *buntu won't update!

Filed under
Ubuntu

ittoolbox blogs: In terms of updating and upgrading your operating system and all other installed programs Linux (and BSD) would have to be about the best thing since sliced bread. Sometimes for unknown reasons or known reasons the packages fail.

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More in Tux Machines

today's howtos

Security Leftovers

Leftovers: Debian, Ubuntu and Derivatives

  • Debian Developers Make Progress With RISC-V Port
    Debian developers continue making progress with a -- currently unofficial -- port of their Linux operating system to RISC-V. There is a in-progress Debian GNU/Linux port to RISC-V along with a repository with packages built for RISC-V. RISC-V for the uninitiated is a promising, open-source ISA for CPUs. So far there isn't any widely-available RISC-V hardware, but there are embedded systems in the works while software emulators are available.
  • 2×08: Pique Oil
  • [Video] Ubuntu 17.04 KDE
  • deepin 15.4 Released, With Download Link & Mirrors
    deepin 15.4 GNU/Linux operating system has been released at April 19th 2017. I list here one official download link and two faster mirrors from Sourceforge. I listed here the Mega and Google mirrors as well but remember they don't provide direct download. The 15.4 provided only as 64 bit, the 32 bit version has already dropped (except by commercial support). I hope this short list helps you.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • Overlayfs snapshots
    At the 2017 Vault storage conference, Amir Goldstein gave a talk about using overlayfs in a novel way to create snapshots for the underlying filesystem. His company, CTERA Networks, has used the NEXT3 ext3-based filesystem with snapshots, but customers want to be able to use larger filesystems than those supported by ext3. Thus he turned to overlayfs as a way to add snapshots for XFS and other local filesystems. NEXT3 has a number of shortcomings that he wanted to address with overlayfs snapshots. Though it only had a few requirements, which were reasonably well supported, NEXT3 never got upstream. It was ported to ext4, but his employer stuck with the original ext3-based system, so the ext4 version was never really pushed for upstream inclusion.
  • Five days and counting
    It is five days left until foss-north 2017, so it is high time to get your ticket! Please notice that tickets can be bought all the way until the night of the 25th (Tuesday), but catering is only included is you get your ticket on the 24th (Monday), so help a poor organizer and get your tickets as soon as possible!
  • OpenStack Radium? Maybe…but it could be Formidable
    OK the first results are in from the OpenStack community naming process for the R release. The winner at this point is Radium.
  • Libreboot Wants Back Into GNU
    Early this morning, Libreboot’s lead developer Leah Rowe posted a notice to the project’s website and a much longer post to the project’s subreddit, indicating that she would like to submit (or resubmit, it’s not clear how that would work at this point) the project to “rejoin the GNU Project.” The project had been a part of GNU from May 14 through September 15 of last year, at which time Ms. Rowe very publicly removed the project from GNU while making allegations of misdeeds by both GNU and the Free Software Foundation. Earlier this month, Rowe admitted that she had been dealing with personal issues at the time and had overreacted. The project also indicated that it had reorganized and that Rowe was no longer in full control.
  • Understanding the complexity of copyleft defense

    The fundamental mechanism defending software freedom is copyleft, embodied in GPL. GPL, however, functions only through upholding it--via GPL enforcement. For some, enforcement has been a regular activity for 30 years, but most projects don't enforce: they live with regular violations. Today, even under the Community Principles of GPL Enforcement, GPL enforcement is regularly criticized and questioned. The complex landscape is now impenetrable for developers who wish their code to remain forever free. This talk provides basic history and background information on the topic.

  • After Bill Gates Backs Open Access, Steve Ballmer Discovers The Joys Of Open Data
    A few months ago, we noted that the Gates Foundation has emerged as one of the leaders in requiring the research that it funds to be released as open access and open data -- an interesting application of the money that Bill Gates made from closed-source software. Now it seems that his successor as Microsoft CEO, Steve Ballmer, has had a similar epiphany about openness. Back in 2001, Ballmer famously called GNU/Linux "a cancer". Although he later softened his views on software somewhat, that was largely because he optimistically claimed that the threat to Microsoft from free software was "in the rearview mirror". Not really: today, the Linux-based Android has almost two orders of magnitude more market share than Windows Phone.
  • New Open Door Policy for GitHub Developer Program
    GitHub has opened the doors on its three year old GitHub Developer Program. As of Monday, developers no longer need to have paid accounts to participate. "We're opening the program up to all developers, even those who don't have paid GitHub accounts," the company announced in a blog post. "That means you can join the program no matter which stage of development you're in,"
  • MuleSoft Joins the OpenAPI Initiative: The End of the API Spec Wars
    Yesterday, MuleSoft, the creators of RAML, announced that they have joined the Open API Initiative. Created by SmartBear Software and based on the wildly popular Swagger Specification, the OpenAPI Initiative is a Linux Foundation project with over 20 members, including Adobe, IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Salesforce.