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About Tux Machines

Monday, 24 Oct 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Firefox 9 Features, Changes srlinuxx 03/10/2011 - 2:43pm
Story Serving CGI Scripts With Nginx On Debian Squeeze/Ubuntu 11.04 falko 03/10/2011 - 6:03am
Story GNOME 3.2 Released - See What's New srlinuxx 6 01/10/2011 - 8:48pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 01/10/2011 - 7:21am
Story some howtos: srlinuxx 01/10/2011 - 7:02am
Story Installing Fedora 16 pre-release srlinuxx 01/10/2011 - 6:57am
Story Mechanical Engineering Useful Software in Linux srlinuxx 01/10/2011 - 3:34am
Story Kernel Log: Coming in 3.1 (Part 4) - Drivers srlinuxx 01/10/2011 - 3:31am
Story Why Firefox Is My Browser Of Choice srlinuxx 01/10/2011 - 3:30am
Poll Firefox Releases srlinuxx 01/10/2011 - 3:00am

(K)Ubuntu to OpenSuSe - My Experience

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I was using Ubuntu in my laptop for a long time and then moved to Kubuntu recently. Both Ubuntu and Kubuntu didn’t recognize my built in web camera. After I read that OpenSuSe recognized the webcam for Daniel Aleksandersen, I thought I would give that a try without an idea of how painful it was going to be.

Nine Reasons Why the Linux Desktop is a Complete Blast!

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A Linux system immediately snaps to attention and does your bidding, with no hassle at all. Even when you tell it to do something impossible, it tries to make you happy and only reports back to you upon failure. If you're tired of the computer popping up an "Are you sure?" dialog box in your face, you'll love Linux.

Ubuntu Tidbits

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I created this post to document all of the small things I do on my Ubuntu systems to make them customized for me. My hope is that people who want to do similar things will learn from my experiences.

Also: Ubuntu Customization Guide

Linux Streaming Wins Respect in Europe

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Sometimes in the public sector, reaching almost everyone isn’t enough. The European Commission (EC) found this out the hard way in late 2006 when it launched a streaming service that supported Windows and Macintosh users but not Linux users. To make matters worse, when citizens across Europe complained, the EC claimed it was illegal to support Linux streaming.

Time to start casting the Linux "Switch" commercials

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Open-source software proponents may end up owing Microsoft a big, ironic thank you for finally getting Vista out the door. Release of the new version of Windows has forced IT folks in the public and private sector to make some serious plans about their upgrade paths, and that could be working in favor of Linux.

A laptop to change the world

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I just returned from the FOSDEM conference in Brussels, probably Europe's most influential Free/Open Source software conference. Unlike many of the more business-oriented Open Source conferences, I love attending the talks at FOSDEM. They are extremely technical and I learn things from the speakers.

New NVIDIA Graphics Drivers for Linux Released

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The latest Version, 1.0-9755, of NVIDIA graphic drivers for linux was released today, March 7, 2007. Highlights inlcude: * Added support for Quadro FX 4600 and Quadro FX 5600 and * Added initial support for NVIDIA SLI with GeForce 8800, Quadro FX 4600, and Quadro FX 5600


Metisse — you thought you knew what 3D was?

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On Tuesday, January 25th Mandriva introduced a new project: Metisse LiveCD. In this article we are going to investigate the features offered by this promising project and see if Metisse can compete with the popular desktops in terms of ergonomics and ease of use.

Tracking your sport activity with open source software

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If you're a FOSS enthusiast who keeps fit by exercising or playing sports, it's time you used an open source application to track your activities. With these programs you can get a good overview of your exercises or create diagrams and statistics for specific time ranges and sport types.

8 Months with Ubuntu

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I just finished building a new machine and reinstalled Ubuntu Edgy - I was going to wait until Feisty was released but was too impatient. Looking back it’s been almost 8 months since I made the switch to Ubuntu…

HP Sees Huge Linux Desktop Deals

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Hewlett-Packard is closing custom deals for thousands of desktop PCs running Linux, which has the company assessing the possibility of offering factory-loaded Linux systems, an HP executive said.

Creating a dd/dcfldd Image Using Automated Image & Restore (AIR)

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Automated Image & Restore (AIR) is an open source application that provides a GUI front end to the dd/dcfldd (Dataset Definition (dd)) command. AIR is designed to easily create forensic disk/partition images. It supports MD5/SHAx hashes, SCSI tape drives, imaging over a TCP/IP network, splitting images, and detailed session logging.

A First Look at Pardus 2007.1 Release Candidate

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As announced yesterday, an unexpected RC of the upcoming spring release 2007.1 of Pardus Linux was made available to the public. Not all the cats are having nine lives, so my experiences with Calisan (the Live CD) and Kurulan (the installation CD) were pretty much different.

The Best Way To Choose A Linux Distro

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Other Linux users might have a different opinion, but I think the best way to choose a Linux distribution is to know how active its community is. The top 10 linux distributions based on the number of its registered members are the following:

Sidux: A live CD for Debian unstable

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It's a rare distribution that impresses me before I've even tried it, but sidux did just that when, a few hours after I'd downloaded and burned a two-day-old preview release, the project announced that the next release was available for download.

Trying the Flock browser - Thoughts on week 1

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I'm trying out Flock as my default browser this week. For those that are new to Flock, it is a browser built from Firefox, but focused on adding features for social networking types of activities. Such as built-in support for editing your blog, or adding photos to services like Flickr.

Aussie business can learn from Linux: IBM chief

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Australia's future economic prosperity will depend on it embracing the principles of community-driven technologies such as Linux and Second Life, according to Glen Boreham.

Choosing a Linux Distribution for Your Business

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If you're confused about the different flavors of Vista in the store, then the varieties of Linux available will leave you gasping like a fish on a dock. Distrowatch, a site which tracks Linux's different distributions, has well over four hundred listings. Faced with so many choices, how do you know what distribution is right for your business?

Fedora Core 6 Linux Eclipses 2M User Mark

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Red Hat's Fedora Core 6 Linux distribution has reached another big milestone, racking up two million installed users barely two months after tallying 1 million installed users.

The Truth About Staying

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What it's really like to move to Windows Vista. I saw a couple of articles linked to and they rang some bells. Many of the points made apply to Vista as well as Mac OS X and Ubuntu. So here it is.

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More in Tux Machines

Android Leftovers

Security News

  • How your DVR was hijacked to help epic cyberattack
    Technology experts warned for years that the millions of Internet-connected "smart" devices we use every day are weak, easily hijacked and could be turned against us. The massive siege on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based company that monitors and routes Internet traffic, shows those ominous predictions are now a reality. An unknown attacker intermittently knocked many popular websites offline for hours Friday, from Amazon to Twitter and Netflix to Etsy. How the breach occurred is a cautionary tale of the how the rush to make humdrum devices “smart” while sometimes leaving out crucial security can have major consequences.
  • Find Out If One of Your Devices Helped Break the Internet
    Security experts have been warning for years that the growing number of unsecured Internet of Things devices would bring a wave of unprecedented and catastrophic cyber attacks. Just last month, a hacker publicly released malware code used in a record-breaking attack that hijacked 1.5 million internet-connected security cameras, refrigerators, and other so-called “smart” devices that were using default usernames and passwords. On Friday, the shit finally hit the fan.
  • Once more, with passion: Fingerprints suck as passwords
    Fingerprints aren’t authentication. Fingerprints are identity. They are usernames. Fingerprints are something public, which is why it should really bother nobody with a sense of security that the FBI used them to unlock seized phones. You’re literally leaving your fingerprints on every object you touch. That makes for an abysmally awful authentication token.
  • Strengthen cyber-security with Linux
    Using open source software is a viable and proven method of combatting cyber-crime It’s encouraging to read that the government understands the seriousness of the loss of $81 million dollars via the hacking of Bangladesh Bank, and that a cyber-security agency is going to be formed to prevent further disasters. Currently, information security in each government department is up to the internal IT staff of that department.
  • Canonical announces live kernel patching for Ubuntu
    Canonical, the company behind the Ubuntu GNU/Linux distribution, has announced that it will provide a live kernel patching services for version 16.04 which was released in April.
  • Everything you know about security is wrong
    If I asked everyone to tell me what security is, what do you do about it, and why you do it. I wouldn't get two answers that were the same. I probably wouldn't even get two that are similar. Why is this? After recording Episode 9 of the Open Source Security Podcast I co-host, I started thinking about measuring a lot. It came up in the podcast in the context of bug bounties, which get exactly what they measure. But do they measure the right things? I don't know the answer, nor does it really matter. It's just important to keep this in mind as in any system, you will get exactly what you measure. [...] If you have 2000 employees, 200 systems, 4 million lines of code, and 2 security people, that's clearly a disaster waiting to happen. If you have 20, there may be hope. I have no idea what the proper ratios should be, if you're willing to share ratios with me I'd love to start collecting data. As I said, I don't have scientific proof behind this, it's just something I suspect is true.
  • Home Automation: Coping with Insecurity in the IoT
    Reading Matthew Garret’s exposés of home automation IoT devices makes most engineers think “hell no!” or “over my dead body!”. However, there’s also the siren lure that the ability to program your home, or update its settings from anywhere in the world is phenomenally useful: for instance, the outside lights in my house used to depend on two timers (located about 50m from each other). They were old, loud (to the point the neighbours used to wonder what the buzzing was when they visited) and almost always wrongly set for turning the lights on at sunset. The final precipitating factor for me was the need to replace our thermostat, whose thermistor got so eccentric it started cooling in winter; so away went all the timers and their loud noises and in came a z-wave based home automation system, and the guilty pleasure of having an IoT based home automation system. Now the lights precisely and quietly turn on at sunset and off at 23:00 (adjusting themselves for daylight savings); the thermostat is accessible from my phone, meaning I can adjust it from wherever I happen to be (including Hong Kong airport when I realised I’d forgotten to set it to energy saving mode before we went on holiday). Finally, there’s waking up at 3am to realise your wife has fallen asleep over her book again and being able to turn off her reading light from your alarm clock without having to get out of bed … Automation bliss!

Microsoft Corruption, Rejections, and Struggles

  • Microsoft licensing corruption scandal in Romania has ended on October 3rd
    This scandal covers buying Microsoft licensees for Romanian administration from 2004 to 2012 for total 228 millions USD. During the investigation was found that more than 100 people, former ministers, mayor of Bucuresti and businessman are involved in this corruption scandal and more than 20 millions euro are paid as bribes.
  • 49ers Colin Kaepernick, Chip Kelly review Microsoft Surface tablets, which Bill Belichick is ‘done’ using
    Ranting about Microsoft’s unreliable, sideline tablets is not a top priority for 49ers coach Chip Kelly and quarterback Colin Kaepernick, not with a five-game losing streak in tow for Sunday’s game against the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. But both Kelly and Kaepernick confirmed this week that they’ve experienced problems with the Microsoft Surface tablets. They’re just not as fed up with them as New England Patriots coach Bill Belichick, who’s lambasted the imperfect technology for years and finally declared this week: “I’m done with the tablets.”
  • Windows: When no growth is an improvement
    Research firms like IDC and Gartner have continued to forecast contraction, not expansion, in the PC business. Only when enterprise migrations to Windows 10 kick into gear do analysts see a reversal of the industry’s historic slump. That isn’t expected to happen until next year.

Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" & 8.15 "Nev" Receive Latest Debian Security Updates

After releasing the first Test build of the upcoming Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" operating system a couple of days ago, today, October 23, 2016, the Parsix GNU/Linux development team announced the availability of new security updates for all supported Parsix GNU/Linux releases. Parsix GNU/Linux 8.10 "Erik" is the current stable release of the Debian-based operating system, and it relies on the Debian Stable (Debian GNU/Linux 8 "Jessie") software repositories. On the other hand Parsix GNU/Linux 8.15 "Nev" is the next major version, which right now is in development, but receives the same updates as the former. Read more