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Monday, 20 Feb 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Slackware: old warhorse is going strong

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

iTWire: The last time I looked at Slackware was nearly seven years ago; version 7.1 was thrown my way by a magazine and I was asked for a review. My usage of the distribution had ended early in 2000 when I moved to Debian after using Slackware 4.0 and then 7.0 for about a year.

Microsoft Strikes GPLv3 Software From Linspire Patent Deal

Filed under
Linux

information week: Microsoft says software that's licensed under GPLv3 is not covered by the patent protection deal it recently signed with desktop Linux distributor Linspire.

Ubuntu Evolution

Filed under
Ubuntu

effiejayx’s blog: I have seen tons and tons of screenshots of Ubuntu screenshots on the web. So I decided to set up this little evolution for the Ubuntu desktops…

Also: ubuntu installation

What is Intel’s mobile Linux game?

Filed under
Linux

Dana Blankenhorn: Intel has a new mobile Linux project dubbed Moblin (right). Sounds great until you realize there are a ton of other, similar frameworks under development. Nokia backs Maemo, Trolltech has Qtopia, and you’ll remember we profiled OpenMoko just a week ago. So what gives?

Also: Intel's Mobile Linux Initiative Misses Vendor Mark?

Proposed Fedora 8 Features

Filed under
Linux

Linux Update: Fedora 8 is currently under development and is scheduled for release in November of this year (2007). This is a quick overview of the proposed features. As these are proposed features and it is still about 4 months from release some of these will change.

An interview with Jeremy Allison

Filed under
Interviews

LinuxWorld: Forget software politics for a minute -- what does the new Samba licensing mean for the version you're actually running, and for the distribution that packages it for you? Samba maintainer Jeremy Allison explains.

GnuCash 2.2.0 released

Filed under
Software

gnomedesktop.org: The GnuCash development team proudly announces GnuCash 2.2.0, the new stable release of the GnuCash Open Source Accounting Software. With this new release series, GnuCash is available on Microsoft Windows for the first time, and it also runs on GNU/Linux, *BSD, Solaris and Mac OSX.

Dell keeps improving Linux support

Filed under
Linux
PCLOS

linux-watch: There's been no major improvements in Dell's Linux software support, but there have been small, but handy, improvements in Dell's support offerings. For Dell Ubuntu laptop users, an important addition is the availability of the Conexant modem driver for the Inspiron E1505n and 1420n.

Easy dvd-video authoring on Ubuntu Linux with Dvdman

Filed under
Software

Isotype: I have made a simple standard-dvd-video with a custom basic menu, using only free software on Ubuntu (Feisty) for pc i386. Ubuntu is a free operating system that, differently from Windows and MacOS has no licensing costs. Let’s make a comparison:

KDE apps : Not *quite* as customizable as I thought

Filed under
KDE

ubuntu-tutorials.com: Recently I’ve been on a GPG kick and have been interested in collecting, signing and using the GPG system more and more. One limitation that I was surprised to find in KGPG is that of the “Export Public Key : To Email” option.

Open source vendors...monopolies waiting to happen?

Filed under
OSS

Matt Asay: Roy Russo wonders if all open source companies are de facto monopolistic. Like many others that I respect (Dave Rosenberg, Lonn Johnston, President Bush, Oscar the Grouch), Roy believes that any market only has (ultimate) room for one purveyor of free (as in software).

Use smartmontools to find out information about your hard drives

Filed under
HowTos

FOSSwire: Hard drives are fragile and complex devices that do not have an infinite life span. Modern hard drives can however tell you quite a bit about how they’re doing and show you some statistics about themselves.

Shell Geek: Rename Multiple Files At Once

Filed under
HowTos

howtogeek: Let's say you have a directory with hundreds of files with the wrong file names, and you'd like to replace every filename containing test with prod. We can easily do this with the "for" command in bash.

Interview with Linus Torvalds

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Interviews

oneopensource.it: Q: Does Linux infinge Microsoft patents? A: As far as we know, the answer is a resounding “no”, and it’s all just MS trying to counter-act the fact that they have problems competing with Linux on a technical side by trying to spread FUD.

Four Key Developments In the Linux Market

Filed under
Linux

seekingalpha: Ubuntu, for those who are new to open source software, is an increasingly popular version of Linux. Early proponents include Dell Inc. (DELL) and Intel Corp. (INTC). Here's a rundown of key open source developments investors should watch over the next few days.

Enabling Beryl On A PCLinuxOS 2007 Desktop

Filed under
PCLOS
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can enable Beryl on a PCLinuxOS 2007 desktop (the system must have a 3D-capable graphics card). With Beryl you can make your desktop use beautiful 3D effects like wobbly windows or a desktop cube.

Back up like an expert with rsync

Filed under
HowTos

linux.com: In the last two months I've been traveling a lot. During the same period my main desktop computer went belly up. I would have been in trouble without rsync at my disposal -- but thanks to my regular use of this utility, my data (or most of it, anyway) was already copied offsite just waiting to be used.

Linux's answer to Microsoft's Surface

Filed under
Sci/Tech

tectonic: In May this year Microsoft's Bill Gates showed off his expensive touch-sensitive table called Surface. Now the Linux world has a similar project under development and has released videos of it in action. While the DiamondTouch employs a different technology to Microsoft's TouchLight, the final result is even better.

Open source invading Australian education

Filed under
Interviews
OSS

LinuxWorld: Australian schools are subscribing to proprietary software - but the choice between proprietary and open source may have not been made on entirely equal ground.

BlueWhite64 Linux adds features and enhancements

Filed under
Linux

desktoplinux: BlueWhite64 Linux v12.0, featuring a 2.6.21.5 Linux kernel with IA32-emulation, has been released on live CD and DVD ISOs. The distribution is aimed at pure 64-bit AMD64 Athlon, Opteron, Sempron, Turion, and Intel EM64T processors in desktops and servers.

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More in Tux Machines

New GNU/Linux Releases: TheSSS, Arkas OS, Black Lab, and Parrot

  • The Smallest Server Suite Gets Special Edition with PHP 7.0.15, Apache 2.4.25
    4MLinux developer Zbigniew Konojacki informs Softpedia about the availability of a special edition of the TheSSS (The Smallest Server Suite) Live Linux operating system. Carrying the same version number as the original TheSSS release, namely 21.0, and dubbed TheSSS7, the new flavor ships with more recent PHP packages from the 7.0.x series. Specifically, TheSSS7 includes PHP 7.0.15, while TheSSS comes with PHP 5.6.30.
  • Descent OS Is Dead, Arkas OS Takes Its Place and It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Some of you out there might remember the Descent OS distro created by Brian Manderville and based on the popular Ubuntu Linux operating system, and today we have some bad news for them as the development is now officially closed. Descent OS first appeared in February 2012 as a lightweight Ubuntu derivative built around the GNOME 2 desktop environment. Back then, it was known as Descent|OS, and was quite actively developed with new features and components borrowed from the latest Ubuntu releases.
  • Black Lab Linux 8.1 Out Now with LibreOffice 5.3, It's Based on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS
    Softpedia was informed today by the Black Lab Software project about the general availability of the first point release to the Black Lab Linux 8.0 operating system series. Serving as a base release to the company's enterprise offerings and equipped with all the long-term supported Linux 4.4 kernel from the Ubuntu 16.04 LTS (Xenial Xerus) operating system, Black Lab Linux 8.1 comes with up-to-date components and the latest security patches ported from Ubuntu's repositories as of February 15, 2017. "Today we are pleased to announce the release of Black Lab Linux 8.1. Our first incremental release to the 8.0 series. In this release we have brought all security updates up to Feb 15, 2017, as well as application updates," said Roberto J. Dohnert, CEO of Black Lab Software.
  • Parrot 3.5 – Call For Betatesters
    We did our best to prepare these preview images including all the updates and the new features introduced since the last release, but now we need your help to understand how to make it even better, and of course we need your help to understand if there is something that doesn’t work as expected or something that absolutely needs to be included in the final release.

Linux and Graphics

  • Linux Kernel 4.10 Now Available for Linux Lite Users, Here's How to Install It
    Minutes after the release of Linux kernel 4.10 last evening, Jerry Bezencon from the Linux Lite project announced that users of the Ubuntu-based distribution can now install it on their machines. Linux 4.10 is now the most advanced kernel branch for all Linux-based operating systems, and brings many exciting new features like virtual GPU support, better writeback management, eBPF hooks for cgroups, as well as Intel Cache Allocation Technology support for the L2/L3 caches of Intel processors.
  • Wacom's Intuos Pro To Be Supported By The Linux 4.11 Kernel
    Jiri Kosina submitted the HID updates today for the Linux 4.11 kernel cycle.
  • Mesa 13.0.5 Released for Linux Gamers with over 70 Improvements, Bug Fixes
    We reported the other day that Mesa 13.0.5 3D Graphics Library will be released this week, and it looks like Collabora's Emil Velikov announced it earlier this morning for all Linux gamers. Mesa 13.0.5 is a maintenance update to the Mesa 13.0 stable series of the open source graphics stack used by default in numerous, if not all GNU/Linux distributions, providing gamers with powerful drivers for their AMD Radeon, Nvidia, and Intel GPUs. It comes approximately three weeks after the Mesa 13.0.4 update.
  • mesa 13.0.5

Interview: Thomas Weissel Installing Plasma in Austrian Schools

With Plasma 5 having reached maturity for widespread use we are starting to see rollouts of it in large environments. Dot News interviewed the admin behind one such rollout in Austrian schools. Read more

today's leftovers

  • Top Lightweight Linux Distributions To Try In 2017
    Today I am going to discuss the top lightweight Linux distros you can try this year on your computer. Although you got yourself a prettyLinuxle linux already but there is always something new to try in Linux. Remember I recommend to try this distros in virtualbox firstly or with the live boot before messing with your system. All distro that I will mention here will be new and somewhat differ from regular distros.
  • [ANNOUNCE] linux-4.10-ck1 / MuQSS CPU scheduler 0.152
  • MSAA Compression Support For Intel's ANV Vulkan Driver
    Intel developer Jason Ekstrand posted a patch over the weekend for enabling MSAA compression support within the ANV Vulkan driver.
  • Highlights of YaST development sprint 31
    As we announced in the previous report, our 31th Scrum sprint was slightly shorter than the usual ones. But you would never say so looking to this blog post. We have a lot of things to talk you about!
  • Comparing Mobile Subscriber Data Across Different Sources - How accurate is the TomiAhonen Almanac every year?
    You’ll see that last spring I felt the world had 7.6 Billion total mobile subscriptions when machine-to-machine (M2M) connections are included. I felt the world had 7.2 Billion total subscriptions when excluding M2M and just counting those in use by humans. And the most relevant number (bottom line) is the ‘unique’ mobile users, which I felt was an even 5.0 Billion humans in 2015. The chart also has the total handsets-in-use statistic which I felt was 5.6 Billion at the end of 2015. Note that I was literally the first person to report on the distinction of the unique user count vs total subscriptions and I have been urging, nearly begging for the big industry giants to also measure that number. They are slowly joining in that count. Similarly to M2M, we also are now starting to see others report M2M counts. I have yet to see a major mobile statistical provider give a global count of devices in use. That will hopefully come also, soon. But lets examine these three numbers that we now do have other sources, a year later, to see did I know what I was doing.