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Friday, 23 Jun 17 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Space Hulk released for Linux Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 4:27pm
Story Hands-on: Steam's in-home PC game streaming beta already feels like magic Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 4:25pm
Story Interview: Jeff Hoogland Talks About Bodhi Linux Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 4:19pm
Story FileZilla, Other Open-Source Software From 'Right' Sources Is Safe Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 4:11pm
Story Leftovers: Gaming Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 9:41am
Story Leftovers: Software Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 9:38am
Story today's howtos Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 9:36am
Story Galileo: The Slowest Fast Computer Around? Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 9:24am
Story Ubuntu’s Juju Wins the Best Cloud Automation Solution Award Rianne Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 9:19am
Story Dutch city of Ede spends 92 percent less (!) than its peers on software licenses Roy Schestowitz 29/01/2014 - 8:58am

From Linspire to PCLinuxOS via Mandriva 2008

Filed under
Linux

planstoprosper.org.uk: Well, I finally moved form my beloved Linspire! Took me a while but Linspire 6 didn't really get my laptop performing as well as it should. I hope that Linspire's new CEO Larry Kettler can get things moving.

Intel Core 2 “Penryn” and Linux

Filed under
Hardware

linuxhardware.org: On October 28th, Intel released the reviews on the new “Penryn” Core 2 processor, specifically the Intel Core 2 Extreme Quad-Core QX9650. The QX9650 has a lot of new features and welcomes a new generation to the Core 2 processor family. So what are these features and how will they equate into benefits to the consumer and, more specifically, Linux users?

Ubuntu: first stop on the road to Damascus

Filed under
Ubuntu

iTWire blogs: In nearly 10 years of experimenting with, and, later, using Linux, I have never been presented with a situation where someone actually asked me to preside over their initial foray into the use of the open source operating system on a regular basis.

Open source values: Consensus

Filed under
OSS

Dana Blankenhorn: Consensus by Rick VoermanLast week I wrote about transparency as an open source value. Today, in the second of this informal series, I want to discuss the value called consensus.

Benchmark Your Linux System with HardInfo

Filed under
Software

tombuntu: Want to compare your computer’s performance? HardInfo is a system profiler and benchmark for Linux systems. It can gather information about your computer and operating system, perform a varitety of benchmarks, and export the data to HTML.

OLPC community-based testing

Filed under
OLPC

gregdek.livejournal: If you've been interested in working on OLPC, but have no idea how to get started, consider becoming a tester of activities. Check out the Activity Testing Matrix.

Also: OLPC XO User Review

Is 2008 the Year of the Linux Desktop?

Filed under
Linux

linux magazine: No doubt you've heard the prediction before — "this is going to be the year of the Linux desktop." At the risk of being repetitive, though, I'm going to go ahead and say it: 2008 really could be the year of the Linux desktop.

Paravirtualized Ubuntu shows early performance promise

Filed under
Ubuntu

techtarget.com: Early testing has shown that Ubuntu, when run as a virtual guest taking advantage of the new paravirt-ops paravirtualization interface, delivers as promised: it runs faster and more efficiently that it would as an unmodified guest.

1,500 companies adopt Oracle Unbreakable Linux

linuxworld: Oracle Wednesday said that 1,500 companies have signed up for its Unbreakable Linux discount support program since it was announced one year ago

Ubuntu scores first major pre-installed server win

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-watch: Ubuntu is extremely popular on the desktop, but it's made comparatively little progress on servers. That's about to change. Dell is expected to announce in the first quarter of 2008 that it has certified Ubuntu Linux for its server lines.

Hands-on with the OLPC XO laptop

Filed under
OLPC

infosyncworld.com: We finally get a close look at the One Laptop Per Child XO laptop, and though nobody could explain the interface, the hardware was pretty cool.

Ceph Distributed Network File System

Filed under
Linux

kernelTRAP: "Ceph is a distributed network file system designed to provide excellent performance, reliability, and scalability with POSIX semantics. I periodically see frustration on this list with the lack of a scalable GPL distributed file system with sufficiently robust replication and failure recovery to run on commodity hardware, and would like to think that--with a little love--Ceph could fill that gap."

Scalable Public Key Infrastructure for both OpenSWAN and OpenVPN

Filed under
HowTos

Debian Administration: User management and the related cryptographic authentication infrastructure is a major hurdle in deploying scalable, manageable VPNs (Virtual Private Networks). Two major pieces of FOSS (Free and Open Source Software) for VPNs are OpenSWAN and OpenVPN.

Open Source: The Gift That Keeps On Giving

LinuxInsider: When it comes time to upgrade to a new version of proprietary software -- take the Windows OS, for example -- many users are less than thrilled. Upgrades can mean an added expense for anything more extensive than a bug fix or minor feature upgrades.

KWin Basics - Part 1.2.1 - Advanced Window Management - Window identification

Filed under
KDE
HowTos

gnuski.blogspot: Yesterday we looked at the basic "Keep Above" and "Keep Below" options within KWin. Today lets get a bit more technical -- permanent identification. When you right-click on that title bar and select Advanced, you get the options:

Kile rationalizes LaTeX

Filed under
Software

linux.com: You can think of Kile as an IDE for the LaTeX document layout system. Instead of requiring you to learn a considerable amount of markup language, as LaTeX itself does, or providing you with a graphical interface that hides you from the complexity, as Lyx does, Kile automates the process of working with LaTeX while keeping the markup visible.

Five More Desktop Blog Editors for GNU/Linux Users

Filed under
Software

beans.seartipy.com: There were some excellent suggestions about very good blog editors for the GNU/Linux platform provided in the comments section of my previous post Five Desktop Blog Editors for GNU/Linux Users. So much so that I have decided to compile a second list.

Ubuntu, PCLinuxOS, SimplyMEPIS - 3 distros, 9 wireless stories

Filed under
Linux

iTWire: Just as as I was getting comfortable using Ubuntu on my desktop, enthusiastic readers have assailed me with stories about how I should give other Linux distros a try - particularly the KDE pair PCLinuxOS and SimplyMEPIS. I'm lucky to have four different computers at my immediate disposal so I tried the live CDs of the three distros on three of them to see how plug and play they were for wireless networking. The results were quite surprising.

Server to server: MacOS X vs. Linux

Filed under
OS

Paul Murphy: It appears that the big changes in the server version focus on ease of use, particularly with respect to network setup, and on getting along in a predominantly Windows environment. When you compare MacOS X server to Linux, however, the key advantage for small businesses isn’t capital cost, it’s ease of setup and use.

Enabling Compiz Fusion On A Fedora 8 GNOME Desktop (ATI Mobility Radeon 9200)

Filed under
HowTos

This tutorial shows how you can enable Compiz Fusion on a Fedora 8 GNOME desktop.

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More in Tux Machines

Desktop: Popcorn Linux, Purism, Distro Hopping, System76, and 2017 Linux Laptop Survey

  • Popcorn Linux OS gives processors a common language
    Thanks to a new operating system called Popcorn Linux, the Navy may be able to speed systems development and cut maintenance. Developed by engineering researchers at Virginia Tech with support from the Office of Naval Research,  Popcorn Linux can compile different programming languages into a common format. The operating system takes generic coding language and translates it into multiple specialized program languages. Then it determines what pieces of the code are needed to perform particular tasks and transfers these instruction “kernels” (the “popcorn” part) to the appropriate function, ONR officials said. Chips for video systems might be programmed in one language and those for networking functions in another. These multicore processors improve computing speed, but they also force programmers to design or upgrade applications based on what programs run on which processors. That means complex systems like battlespace awareness and artificial intelligence that require specialized processors must be manually adjusted so components can interact with each other.
  • Purism's Security Focused Librem Laptops Go Mainstream as GA Begins, with $2.5M in Total Project Funding and 35 Percent Average Monthly Growth
  • Now it’s easier to buy Purism’s Linux laptops
    After running a crowdfunding campaign in 2015 to raise money for a laptop that runs free and open source software, Purism has been able to ship a limited number of 13 and 15 inch laptops, and the corporation is taking pre-orders for a 2-in-1 tablet.
  • Are You a Distro Hopper?
    Is distro hopping a dying sport or have I just gotten too old? When I first started to use Linux I was the quintessential cliche distro hopper. I swapped and switched flavor of Linux seemingly every other day, certain that at some point I’d find the right fit and stop, content with at whatever combination of distro base and desktop environment I’d hit upon.
  • System76 Continues Working On GNOME Improvements For Future Ubuntu
    System76 continues working on improvements to the GNOME stack as part of their transition in-step to using it over Unity 7, in line with Canonical's decision to switch Ubuntu over to GNOME and abandon their grand Unity 8 ambitions.
  • 2017 Linux Laptop Survey
    It has been a few years since last running any Linux hardware surveys on Phoronix, as overall the ecosystem has rather matured nicely while of course there are still notable improvements to be had in the areas of GPUs and laptops. (Additionally, OpenBenchmarking.org provides a plethora of analytic capabilities when not seeking to collect subjective data / opinions.) But now we are hosting the 2017 Linux Laptop Survey to hopefully further improvements in this area.

Software and GNOME: Pass, Popcorn Time, Nixnote2, Grive, Curlew, and GtkActionMuxer

  • Pass – A Simple command-line Password Manager for Linux
    Keep tracking the password is one of the big challenge to everyone now a days since we has multiple password like email, bank, social media, online portal, and ftp, etc.,. Password managers are become very famous due to the demand and usage. In Linux so many alternatives are available, GUI based and CLI based. Today we are going to discuss about CLI based password manager called pass.
  • Popcorn Time Watch Movies and TV Shows On Linux
    ​Watching your favorite TV shows and movies series is what you all guys do every day. Flash, Iron Fist or Moana and many more awesome movies and tv shows that we love to watch. The problems come when you are traveling. Many of your shows or movies are restricted to a particular region and cannot be accessed when you are traveling or want to just quickly watch that awesome flash punch from an episode of 1 month old.
  • Nixnote2 – A Clone of Evernote for Linux
    When I created a list of Alternative Evernote Clients for Linux, the formerly known NeverNote was on the list as NixNote since it hadn’t gained a “2” to its title yet. It has been 4 months since and I decided to give the app its own review for you guys. Without further ado, let’s get to it. NixNote2 (also called NixNote) is an unofficial client of Evernote for Linux. It possesses most of the features Evernote provides including the use of Notebooks, tags, themes, emails, and multiple accounts.
  • Grive – A Dockerized Google Drive Client for Linux
    Not too long ago I reviewed Grive2 as an alternative Google Drive client for Linux. Today, I’ll introduce you to Grive, a Docker implementation for the Google Drive client, Grive2. Docker (if you don’t already know what it is), is a tool designed to benefit both system admins and developers thanks to its use of containers. Docker’s containers provide a way for developers to create and distribute their apps using containers.
  • Curlew is a GTK Media Converter for the GNOME desktop
    There are plenty of free multimedia converters for Ubuntu available, with command-line champ FFmpeg arguably the most powerful of them all. But this power comes with a complexity. Using FFMpeg to convert media through the command line can be intimidating and arcane. Which is why FFMpeg frontends are popular.
  • Dazzle spotlight – Multi Paned and Action Muxing
    The way the GtkActionMuxer works is by following the widget hierarchy to resolve GActions. Since the HeaderBar is a sibling to the content area (and not a direct ancestor) you cannot activate those actions. It would be nice for the muxer to gain more complex support, but until then… Dazzle.

Games: Witcher 2 & Rocket League, Ashes of the Singularity and More

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