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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story An Intel-Based Ubuntu Touch Tablet Is Planning To Launch Soon Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 4:29pm
Story Guake Review – The Last Drop-Down Terminal You'll Ever Use Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 3:07pm
Story Ubuntu's Unity 8 desktop removes the Amazon search 'spyware' Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 2:55pm
Story Rebuilding tech in Afghanistan with open source Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 2:47pm
Story [ANNOUNCE] xorg-server 1.16.99.901 Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 2:43pm
Story SIMD8 Vertex Shaders For Broadwell Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 1:18pm
Story Survey indicates four out of five developers now use open source Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 12:12pm
Story UBUNTU DEVELOPER TOOLS CENTER 0.1 RELEASED WITH ECLIPSE AND ANDROID ADT SUPPORT Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 12:05pm
Story Systemd, but no journald, in new SUSE release Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 11:59am
Story ownCloud updates for Fedora 19 and EPEL 6 Rianne Schestowitz 29/10/2014 - 10:54am

Ubuntu goes enterprise

Filed under
Ubuntu

Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols: Ubuntu is well known in user circles as the cool kids' Linux. It's available pre-installed on PCs and laptops from Dell and from numerous smaller computer vendors. What Ubuntu hasn't been known as is a Linux distribution that matters to CIOs and IT managers. Things are changing.

Mark Surman: New Mozilla Foundation Executive Director

Filed under
Moz/FF

blog.lizardwrangler: I’m thrilled to announce that Mark Surman is joining the Mozilla Foundation as our new Executive Director. Mark joins us after a long period of getting to know — and being known by — Mozilla contributors.

9 Linux Myth Debunked

Filed under
Linux

hehe2.net: When it comes to Linux there are 3 kinds of people, those who never heard of it, those who are afraid of it, and those who hate it and spread falsities about it. I don’t really care about the first, they probably aren’t really technologically literate anyways, as long as they have E-mail they are content. While the second group is the result of the actions of the third. Let’s hit two birds with one stone shall we?

Also: Linux Myth #2 - Linux is more difficult to install

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • OpenOffice.org Tips and Tricks Part II

  • Short Tip: Ignore files in svn
  • zypper feature: source and automatic build dependencies install
  • How to install advanced desktop effects in ubuntu
  • Keeping your Home Directory Organized
  • Cook your RAW photos into JPEG with Linux
  • Enabling Multiple CPUs (SMP) in Ubuntu
  • Free your IPODS (on Linux)
  • Bash Files

Ubuntu at Toyota

Filed under
Ubuntu

zen.org: I’m waiting a few hours at the Thompson Toyota, my Prius is getting some minor work done to it to pass state inspection, it still takes a few hours. I wiggle the mouse, and up pops the Ubuntu Heron! Wow!

My first taste of XFCE…

Filed under
Software

meandubuntu.wordpress: Well, I gave KDE a whirl, but it’s not ready for me yet, so I thought I might try out XFCE. The first thing I wanted to do was get mono and mono apps off my system, just to see where that would put me. I lost three apps.

Adventures with Mandriva 2009.0 Beta 1

Filed under
MDV

beranger.org: Using Mandriva has always been a love-hate relationship for me. Mandriva's distros were attractive, but quite buggy. In old times, whatever you could get for free was already outdated: I still remember the frustration. In recent times, it was mostly about the random bugs.

NimbleX 2008 is speedy but flawed

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: NimbleX, a Slackware-based distribution, advertises itself as "the new wave of Linux." However, what is appealing in NimbleX -- its speed and small footprint and the resulting selection of alternative software choices -- will likely strike veteran GNU/Linux users as being very old school.

Fedora to Offer College Scholarships

Filed under
Linux

ostatic.com: Forget special sale prices on calculators and dorm room furniture, Fedora has the ultimate back-to-school offer -- a schloarship program for college-bound students who contribute to free software and the Fedora Project.

And: * Where Red Hat (And Its Partners) Profit Most
* Fedora infrastructure breach?
* Changing Window Manager on Fedora

4 Linux Distros Which Look Like Mac OS X

Filed under
Linux

internetling.com: What a week! I’ve been working on my podcast so I’m a bit behind on posting. Here’s an interesting compilation of Linux distribution which resemble Apple’s Mac OS 10. They might not be identical, but you guys who like Apple’s design might appreciate the fact yu can get something like it, with the nice-on-the-inside GNU/Linux kernel, out-of-the-box. For free.

Forbes rewrites the history of open source

Filed under
OSS

blogs.zdnet.com: In the name of defining jargon, Forbes this week tries a complete rewrite of open source history. This is accomplished by someone named Dan Woods, who calls his company Evolved Media.

ArchLinux: My ultimate GNU/Linux distro of choice

Filed under
Linux

libreinfo.wordpress: Finally, after testing, using and experimenting with dozens of GNU/Linux distributions during the last 4 years, I’ve found my ultimate distro of choice. It’s ArchLinux. I’ve never been so happy to be a GNU/Linux user as today.

Debian @15 is it still relevant?

Filed under
Linux
  • Debian @15 is it still relevant?

  • Debian GNU/Linux: 15 Years Old and at the Crossroads

Take a closer look at OpenBSD 4.3

Filed under
OS

OpenBSD provides a UNIX distribution with a primary emphasis on security and cryptography. If you're looking for a UNIX distribution to deploy in the most critical nexus in your network infrastructure, look no further than OpenBSD. The recent release of OpenBSD—version 4.3—includes several new features and bug fixes that this article reviews.

DistroWatch Weekly, Issue 266

Filed under
Linux

This week in DistroWatch Weekly:

  • Reviews: Mandriva Flash 2008.1 on ASUS Eee PC 900

  • News: Slackware tests KDE 4.1, Fedora suffers from update outage, attackers crack LinuxMint.com, interviews with Ubuntu's Scott Remnant and gOS's David Liu, Zypper tips and tricks
  • Released last week: Scientific Linux 5.2 "Live CD/DVD", ClarkConnect 4.3
  • Upcoming releases: Mandriva Linux 2009 Beta 2, openSUSE 11.1 Alpha 2
  • New additions: FaunOS, Inquisitor
  • New distributions: Asterisk on IPCop
  • Reader comments

Read more in this week's issue of DistroWatch Weekly....

Canonical Joins The Linux Foundation

Filed under
Ubuntu

linux-foundation.org: The Linux Foundation, the nonprofit organization dedicated to accelerating the growth of Linux, today announced that Canonical has become a member of the Foundation.

Three Firefox extensions for Gmail

Filed under
Moz/FF

linux.com: Gmail, Google's popular Web mail application, is already full of useful features all on its own. But Firefox users can further customize Gmail with a variety of add-ons. Some only change the appearance, while others add functionality that makes Gmail more like a personal planner than just a plain old email application. Let's take a look at three Firefox add-ons for Gmail.

The Linux Kernel

Filed under
Linux

ubuntu.sg: Many refer Linux as an Operating System. Linux is not an Operating System. GNU/Linux is. Linux refers to the Kernel of an Operating System.

Concept Distro

Filed under
Linux

netsplit.com: The Concept Distro would be an engineering project to allow developers and maintainers to let their imaginations run wild. It’d be released, probably to demonstrate at a major event, and would explicitly not be supported.

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Improving Font Rendering in Ubuntu

  • openSuse compared after some time
  • Review of CrossOver Linux 7.0.2
  • Git 1.6.0 Released
  • Ubuntu growing its ecosystem of apps, partners, Canonical says
  • Why it’s a bad idea to use Debian Sid for daily use
  • Linux Outlaws 51 - Too Young for Jail
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More in Tux Machines

OSS Leftovers

  • Sunjun partners with Collabora to offer LibreOffice in the Cloud
  • Tackling the most important issue in a DevOps transformation
    You've been appointed the DevOps champion in your organisation: congratulations. So, what's the most important issue that you need to address?
  • PSBJ Innovator of the Year: Hacking cells at the Allen Institute
  • SUNY math professor makes the case for free and open educational resources
    The open educational resources (OER) movement has been gaining momentum over the past few years, as educators—from kindergarten classes to graduate schools—turn to free and open source educational content to counter the high cost of textbooks. Over the past year, the pace has accelerated. In 2017, OERs were a featured topic at the high-profile SXSW EDU Conference and Festival. Also last year, New York State generated a lot of excitement when it made an $8 million investment in developing OERs, with the goal of lowering the costs of college education in the state. David Usinski, a math and computer science professor and assistant chair of developmental education at the State University of New York's Erie Community College, is an advocate of OER content in the classroom. Before he joined SUNY Erie's staff in 2007, he spent a few years working for the Erie County public school system as a technology staff developer, training teachers how to infuse technology into the classroom.

Mozilla: Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society, New AirMozilla Audience Demo, Firefox Telemetry

  • Net Neutrality, NSF and Mozilla's WINS Challenge Winners, openSUSE Updates and More
    The National Science Foundation and Mozilla recently announced the first round of winners from their Wireless Innovation for a Networked Society (WINS) challenges—$2 million in prizes for "big ideas to connect the unconnected across the US". According to the press release, the winners "are building mesh networks, solar-powered Wi-Fi, and network infrastructure that fits inside a single backpack" and that the common denominator for all of them is "they're affordable, scalable, open-source and secure."
  • New AirMozilla Audience Demo
    The legacy AirMozilla platform will be decommissioned later this year. The reasons for the change are multiple; however, the urgency of the change is driven by deprecated support of both the complex back-end infrastructure by IT and the user interface by Firefox engineering teams in 2016. Additional reasons include a complex user workflow resulting in a poor user experience, no self-service model, poor usability metrics and a lack of integrated, required features.
  • Perplexing Graphs: The Case of the 0KB Virtual Memory Allocations
    Every Monday and Thursday around 3pm I check dev-telemetry-alerts to see if there have been any changes detected in the distribution of any of the 1500-or-so pieces of anonymous usage statistics we record in Firefox using Firefox Telemetry.

Games: All Walls Must Fall, Tales of Maj'Eyal

  • All Walls Must Fall, the quirky tech-noir tactics game, comes out of Early Access
    This isometric tactical RPG blends in sci-fi, a Cold War that never ended and lots of spirited action. It’s powered by Unreal Engine 4 and has good Linux support.
  • Non-Linux FOSS: Tales of Maj'Eyal
    I love gaming, but I have two main problems with being a gamer. First, I'm terrible at video games. Really. Second, I don't have the time to invest in order to increase my skills. So for me, a game that is easy to get started with while also providing an extensive gaming experience is key. It's also fairly rare. All the great games tend to have a horribly steep learning curve, and all the simple games seem to involve crushing candy. Thankfully, there are a few games like Tales of Maj'Eyal that are complex but with a really easy learning curve.

KDE and GNOME: KDE Discover, Okular, Librsvg, and Phone's UI Shell

  • This week in Discover, part 7
    The quest to make Discover the most-loved Linux app store continues at Warp 9 speed! You may laugh, but it’s happening! Mark my words, in a year Discover will be a beloved crown jewel of the KDE experience.
  • Okular gains some more JavaScript support
    With it we support recalculation of some fields based on others. An example that calculates sum, average, product, minimum and maximum of three numbers can be found in this youtube video.
  • Librsvg's continuous integration pipeline
    With the pre-built images, and caching of Rust artifacts, Jordan was able to reduce the time for the "test on every commit" builds from around 20 minutes, to little under 4 minutes in the current iteration. This will get even faster if the builds start using ccache and parallel builds from GNU make. Currently we have a problem in that tests are failing on 32-bit builds, and haven't had a chance to investigate the root cause. Hopefully we can add 32-bit jobs to the CI pipeline to catch this breakage as soon as possible.
  • Design report #3: designing the UI Shell, part 2
    Peter has been quite busy thinking about the most ergonomic mobile gestures and came up with a complete UI shell design. While the last design report was describing the design of the lock screen and the home screen, we will discuss here about navigating within the different features of the shell.