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Monday, 29 Aug 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story phoronix: nvidia, xorg, ext4, cpuidle srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:38am
Story Adventures in IPv6 srlinuxx 09/06/2011 - 2:35am
Story Re: Control is Highly Overrated and Overpriced srlinuxx 4 09/06/2011 - 2:27am
Story The relationship between CentOS and Redhat srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:35pm
Story EBooks are "attacking our freedom" srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:33pm
Story Discovering a New World srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 10:30pm
Story Has Linux Missed the IPv6 Day Train? srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 8:43pm
Story FreeNAS 8 review srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:42pm
Story Valve and Linux Troubles srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:40pm
Story GNOME, KDE and Unity: Virtual Desktops srlinuxx 08/06/2011 - 7:37pm

A first look at Thunderbird 2.0

Filed under
Moz/FF
Reviews

After many months of development, Thunderbird 2.0 is almost ready to debut. The Mozilla Foundation released the first beta of Thunderbird 2.0 last week, and I've been using it to manage my mail since then. The new release boasts tagging, history navigation, new mail alerts, improved extension support, and a number of other features. Thunderbird 2.0 won't knock your socks off with exciting new features, but it's a nice, gradual improvement over the Thunderbird 1.5 series.

Novell and Microsoft share customers

Filed under
SUSE

The news today out of Walmond (Waltham/Redmond) is that some marquee customers are buying into the Microsoft-Novell deal. Specifically, AIG, Credit Suisse, and Deutsche Bank are all on the record as being happy "new" customers.

The year in Linux, 2006

Filed under
Linux

The year in Linux 2006 came in with a “March of the Penguins,” and is going out with “Happy Feet.” In between, the Linux and open source industry saw major changes. Here is a summary of the big Linux stories of 2006, and some others you may have missed.

Ubuntu Linux 6.10 on the Panasonic Toughbook CF-18 Tablet PC

Filed under
Ubuntu

I recently installed Ubuntu 6.10 on the Panasonic Toughbook CF-18 Tablet PC (model CF-18FDHZBVE) that I had previously installed Ubuntu 5.10 on (you can find that writeup here). This model comes in two versions - one with a touchscreen (i.e. you can use your finger) and one with an active digitizer (i.e. you need the pen). The digitizer model is the one in this article.

Door open to open-source pacts

Filed under
Interviews

The pact between Microsoft and Novell has led to widespread speculation over the long-term impact on the adoption of open-source software. Microsoft's Bill Hilf spoke further about the deal addressing how Microsoft views its intellectual property relative to Linux.

Open source 2007 and desktop Linux

Filed under
OSS

It's going to be another year of desktop Linux talk. IDC says this will be the year businesses revolt against Microsoft's anti-piracy efforts and back desktop Linux.

OpenSuSE 10.2 Review

Filed under
Reviews
SUSE

My previous experience with SuSE was with the 10.1 version of the product, which while worked for what I wanted, tended to be a bit sluggish on my AMD Athlon XP 2600 and I changed to KUbuntu in the meanwhile.

Enhancing second language acquisition with Audacity

As a language educator and IT aficionado, I am constantly searching for tools that I can use in conjunction with language education. Lately I've been using the audio manipulation and conversion tool Audacity to record and edit audio inputs and convert them into a variety of formats, including the ever popular MP3, for a number of uses in courses and course materials preparation.

Mark Shuttleworth: Real real-time collaboration

Filed under
OSS

Collaboration is the key ingredient in free software - the fact that developers can collaborate despite geographical and cultural differences between them is what has made it all possible. And our tools for collaboration are pretty good. I maintain you need three things before you get an explosion in collaboration:

25% off: will this bring new Club members to Mandriva?

Filed under
MDV

They have tried it before, without much success. A Mandriva newsletter told us that anyone who orders a Standard, Silver or Gold Mandriva Club membership between 19 and 25 december will get a special 25% off price.

Howtos, Tutorials, & the like:

Filed under
HowTos
  • How to install & play World of Warcraft : Ubuntu

  • Explanation of the Ubuntu / Linux file structure : Ubuntu
  • Mount Network File systems (NFS,Samba) in Ubuntu
  • Install .rpm Files in Ubuntu
  • Administer Your Ubuntu Server Remotely
  • Truecrypt 4.2a and Kernel 2.6.18 and 2.6.19 support

Tips and Tricks for Linux Admins: Discover, Map and Store

Filed under
HowTos

At the cost of great exertion and mental prowess, I have collected just for you an astounding assortment of useful commands and tools for performing amazing feats like network host discovery and mapping your network, mapping IP addresses to their physical locations, spying on everyone who is logged into a computer and even better, faster, securer remote file access.

Software installation on Linux: Tomorrow, it won’t (part 2)

Filed under
Linux

Many third parties have built their businesses around proprietary software, and we can’t just ignore them. And “ecosystem” implies decentralized, which I argued in part 1 was a key tenet of open source development anyway, i.e., this should be playing to one of our core strengths. So, if your “solution” is to tell ISVs (independent software vendors) to give us their source code so the distributions can include it because that’s just how we do things, you can safely skip the rest of the post.

Installing openSUSE 10.2 on a Compaq laptop (Part 1)

Filed under
Reviews

My favorite distro faces an uncertain future, so I decided to install openSUSE 10.2 over it on my Compac Presario V2000. Also because... OK, I'll come clean: the real reason was for the eye candy. I wanted Beryl, with the cube, the wobbly windows, the "magic lantern" window minimizing effects, rain, snow -- you know, Eye Candy.

Ubuntu Edgy - 45 days later

Filed under
Ubuntu

There are few Linux users or potential users that haven't heard of UBUNTU. When it first released in September 2004, it promised an every six month release and was touted as “always free.” With two full production cycles annually, the latest in software is always at hand and to date, only once has the cycle not been met. That was due to the release of a product that would feature long term support.

'Twas the night before Christmas

Filed under
Humor

Twas the night before Christmas, when all through the house not a creature was stirring, just my USB mouse;

The wife and the children are all settled in bed, As I sit at my desk scratching my head.

What does 2007 hold for open source?

Filed under
OSS

I couldn't have an easier time playing fortune-teller this year. While some segments of the IT market might see the future as a wide-open plain, for the open source community, 2007 is shaping up to be a year for settling unfinished business.

Open Source Software is getting good - Are you falling behind?

Filed under
OSS

Open source software has historically been affiliated with minor or 'un-supported' software. Companies (in particular IT departments) have often turned down free, Open Source software alternatives in exchange for more costly, closed source applications because any number of the following commonly held beliefs.

SUSE co-founder returns to Novell

Filed under
SUSE

SUSE co-founder Hubert Mantel is back in the saddle at Novell. Back in November of 2005 when the well-respected chief maintainer of the SUSE Linux kernel left Novell, he said in an email announcing his resignation that "This is no longer the company I founded 13 years ago."

5 Advantages of using Linux over Windows

Filed under
Linux

So, your a new, or fairly moderate Linux user, who wants to know what the true advantages of using Linux over Windows are? There are several advantages, and of course, some disadvantages to using the Linux operating system. This article covers 5 advantages of using Linux over Windows, and lists a few disadvantages as well.

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More in Tux Machines

GNOME News

  • The Begining
    The friendship/relationship with the awesome community of GNOME begins. What followed after 2 commits into the main branch, one application submission, and the result was the start of the most amazing few months. These months have been a humbling experience, the biggest learning experience, and the most productive time.
  • GTK+ Tester Window?
    For an internal application, I’ve created a Gtk.Window derived tester class, added some widgets to show current test, status, number of fails and a Gtk.Grid to attach custom widgets. This class expose some API to set a widget to test, autoclose and some signals you can use to run some tests.
  • GUADEC 2016
    A lot of great things happened – as always GUADEC with it’s perfect size got me to speak to a hell lot of new and interesting people. Thank you all for being there – it was a pleasure.

Leftovers: OSS and Sharing

  • #MyOpenHA Part 1 -Philosophy
    Home Automation. The holy hipster and geek grail. I have played with it. I have tried. I have failed. But today I am proud to have a solution I can truly endorse. So join me on this journey. This series will explain my solution, in excruciating detail. In the hope that I can learn from you while I am explaining. This series will be filled over time with more and more articles. But now, let’s talk about philosophy. The Why. Soon you will see the What and How. One promise, or the TL;DR: It is all 100% Open Source. Well, almost. I have integrated some quite non-open things but always in an Open Source Way.
  • Disable the new Firefox 48 location bar - Tutorial
    Here we are. Seven minutes later, our life is bearable again, but not perfect. Thank you Mozilla, thank you very much. This is exactly what I needed to enrich my life. After all, we all know, cosmetic changes are good, because that's what plants crave. Stop with these idiotic tweaks please. No one cares. It won't make the browser better. It won't change the market share. It will not attract idiots, as idiots are happy. It will only alienate diehard users who keep on using your browser because they have no alternative. From a loved favorite to the least of evils choice. That's what Firefox has become.
  • What’s Happening in OpenStack-Ansible (WHOA) – August 2016
    My goal with these posts is to inform more people about what we’re doing in the OpenStack-Ansible community and bring on more contributors to the project.
  • PowerShell on Linux? No, Thank You [comic]
  • LLVM Might Get An AAP Back-End (Altruistic Processor)
    There's an active proposal to incorporate a back-end into LLVM for AAP, a processor ISA for deeply-embedded Harvard architectures. AAP is designed for FPGA usage and there is an open-source soft-core with commercial deployments also being available. AAP is short for the Altruistic Processor and is described in technical detail here. AAP is said to be an original design but inspired by the OpenRISC / RISC-V projects.
  • UK-French Data Taskforce publishes joint report
    "Invest in and share experiences building core data registers, learning from the French National Address Database experience”; “develop initiatives to bring basic data literacy into primary and secondary education”; and “commission research into algorithmic transparency and accountability” are among the recommendations listed in a report published in July by the joint French-UK Data Taskforce.
  • Tuscany: how to promote the economy of sharing and collaboration
    In June, the region of Tuscany (Italy), in collaboration with Open Toscana and ANCI Toscana, launched a project, the goal of which is to “build a regional policy on the economy of sharing and collaboration”.
  • MS Tries But Just Doesn’t Get FLOSS
    This is what drove me to GNU/Linux so many years ago.
  • Microsoft's maps lost Melbourne because it used bad Wikipedia data
    Microsoft has laid part of the blame for Bing Maps' mis-location of the Australian city of Melbourne by a whole hemisphere on Wikipedia. Yes, Wikipedia, “the free encyclopaedia that anyone can edit.” Microsoft made its admission after your correspondent took to Twitter on Monday to do what we in publishing call “pimping"the story of Melbourne's mis-placement. Ricky Brundritt, a senior program manager at Bing Maps, noticed that pimping and responded as follows.
  • Northern Ireland promotes Open Data in education
    The Northern Ireland Department of Finance has supported a challenge that encourages the re-use of public Open Data in education. Called the OpenDataNI Challenge – Using Open Data for Education” (ODNI4EDU), this project, officially launched on June 14, intends to award two applications or educational tools and resources that make use of at least one dataset published on the portal OpendataNI.
  • Try this handy tool to convert a Web site into a native app with Electron
  • Introducing CloudiumOS [Ed: built on Electron]
    It is a complete multi platform operating system that allows you to manage your documents, access your media files and collaborate with other people on the go. CloudiumOS can work side-by-side with another operating system (either via a VM, a Desktop app or Mobile App) or as a standalone installation.

Opera Data Breach, Security of Personal Data

  • Opera User? Your Stored Passwords May Have Been Stolen
    Barely a week passes without another well-known web company suffering a data breach or hack of some kind. This week it is Opera’s turn. Opera Software, the company behind the web-browser and recently sold to a Chinese consortium for $600 million, reported a ‘server breach incident’ on its blog this weekend.
  • When it comes to protecting personal data, security gurus make their own rules
    Marcin Kleczynski, CEO of a company devoted to protecting people from hackers, has safeguarded his Twitter account with a 14-character password and by turning on two-factor authentication, an extra precaution in case that password is cracked. But Cooper Quintin, a security researcher and chief technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, doesn’t bother running an anti-virus program on his computer. And Bruce Schneier? The prominent cryptography expert and chief technology officer of IBM-owned security company Resilient Systems, won’t even risk talking about what he does to secure his devices and data.

Android Leftovers