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Friday, 02 Dec 16 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story Perens: the FOSS fire still burns srlinuxx 15/01/2012 - 3:45am
Story Ubuntu in the Corporate srlinuxx 15/01/2012 - 12:00am
Story Big Bash Of Video Players On Gnome 3 srlinuxx 14/01/2012 - 11:56pm
Story Fedora vs. openSUSE vs. CentOS: Which Distribution Should You Use? srlinuxx 14/01/2012 - 11:52pm
Story today's leftovers: srlinuxx 7 14/01/2012 - 5:18pm
Story Fedora Running Beefy Contest srlinuxx 14/01/2012 - 5:39am
Story 3 Nice Blender Made Games for Linux srlinuxx 13/01/2012 - 11:42pm
Story Major Changes to Take Place to the Internet in 2012 srlinuxx 13/01/2012 - 11:40pm
Story The Best PDF Viewer for Linux srlinuxx 13/01/2012 - 11:37pm
Story LCA code of conduct: devil is in the detail srlinuxx 13/01/2012 - 8:35pm

looking forward to Mandriva 2008

Filed under
MDV

Now that Mandriva 2007 Spring has been released and the corrupted Mandriva Cooker subversion repository has been fixed, development for Mandriva 2008 has started now. Some things which I have on my wishlist for Mandriva 2008:

Giving people Ubuntu envy

Filed under
Ubuntu

While preparing for my presentation to the staff of the Sun.Star website last week, I was a bit worried whether Ubuntu Feisty Fawn would detect and work with the office’s LCD projector.

Ubuntu Linux Gets Feisty

Filed under
Ubuntu

Three years after it burst onto the operating system scene, the Debian-based Ubuntu Linux has entered its sixth generation with the release of 7.04 dubbed "Feisty Fawn" globally today.

Feisty Fawn is distributed as both a desktop and server edition.

What about a contest for the next debian.org theme?

Filed under
Web

Currently there is a discussion about a new theme for debian.org going on on -www. Some people presented their ideas and build some mockups while others commented them.

I strongly suggest to let some professional designers and other (not necessarily Debian related) talented people create some mockups, to avoid moving from one outdated and rusty design to the next.

How to Install Java Runtime Environment (JRE) in Ubuntu

Filed under
HowTos

Java is an object-oriented programming language developed by Sun Microsystems in the early 1990s. Java applications are compiled to bytecode, which at runtime is either interpreted or compiled to native machine code for execution.

Michael Dell uses Ubuntu!

Filed under
Ubuntu

Lately I have been blogging that I am an Ubuntu Fan and use both Ubuntu and Mac. The story was that after 20 years of struggling with Microsoft, after a major crash of my Lenovo that left me without access to my data for five days I was ready for something new. I experimented both with Mac and Ubuntu and liked both for different reasons and now I used both at my office.

Sabayon Brings Eye Candy To The Linux Desktop

Filed under
Linux

If you think whiz-bang graphical effects are limited to Windows Vista or Mac OS X, think again. The Linux distro Sabayon features some impressive desktop animations complete with whirling, rotating 3D cubes and rippling, bendable window elements that put both Windows Vista and OS X to shame.

Silverlight vs Flash: How Flash can beat the Redmond devil

Filed under
Software

Microsoft recently unveiled Silverlight, their answer to Adobe's Flash. While the most obvious thing about Silverlight has already been addressed (missing Linux support), another will be the upcomming battle between MS and Adobe. By positioning Silverlight directly as a competitor to Flash, Microsoft has already started the first round of what could become a battle between Silverlight and Flash.

Mozilla Foundation Executive Director

Filed under
Moz/FF

One of the great strengths of the Mozilla project is the dedication of its participants. Many people participate over a period of years - sometimes as volunteers, sometimes as employees - figuring out new ways to contribute.

Linux: The Completely Fair Scheduler

Filed under
Linux

Ingo Molnar [interview] released a new patchset titled the "Modular Scheduler Core and Completely Fair Scheduler". He explained, "this project is a complete rewrite of the Linux task scheduler.

Feisty minus 24 hours: Checklist for upgrade

Filed under
Ubuntu

A short list of things you might back up before moving to Feisty. This isn’t to suggest you’ll have problems, but if you’re planning a clean install (which I highly recommend), or if things don’t go as you intend, it would be good to have these on an external drive or a networked machine.

Bookmarks. Export your bookmarks list from Firefox, or your preferred browser.

tux500: Where are we now?

Filed under
Linux

Well, hasn't this been an interesting week. To say that the Linux Community lacks passion is akin to saying Van Gogh didn't like stars. In any event, and regardless of your personal feelings about the Tux500 project or mainstream advertising for Linux, most of the people we talk to agree.

AMD 8.36.5 Display Driver

Filed under
Software

Last month the AMD Catalyst Control Center Linux Edition had entered the world with mixed opinions by the ATI/AMD Linux user community. In our 8.35.5 Linux driver review we had looked at the Linux version of the Catalyst Control Center quite extensively. This new control center replaced the old fireglcontrolpanel and in our opinion was a huge move for AMD.

Debian: some people just don't get it

Filed under
Linux

It was interesting to see the comments which Steven J. Vaughan-Nichols made about the Debian project recently. Interesting, because they resulted in a rejoinder from a Debian developer, Thaddeus Black - not a particularly prominent person in the project, not the leader.

CentOS 5 is a solid enterprise OS

Filed under
Linux
Reviews

Last week, two years since its last major release, the CentOS project released version 5 of its enterprise-focused Linux distribution. I downloaded it and put it to the test, and found that CentOS 5 has maintained its tradition of robustness and reliability while adding new features like virtualization.

Oxygen usability icon survey

Filed under
KDE

The nice guys at OpenUsability have prepared a fantastic icon survey.

This survey will help KDE’s usability experts to point us which icons we should change or improve and which are already good. Thanks very much o everybody which will enter the survey.

PS: it doesn’t take very long, and there are no hard questions.

Tip of the Trade: GParted

Filed under
HowTos

Most Linux system administrators are familiar with GParted, the excellent open source graphical disk-partitioning tool. GParted outshines all graphical disk-partioners, including its commercial competitors. With GParted, you can create, destroy, resize, move, and copy partitions on all the major filesystems, including ext2/3, NTFS, fat16/32, Reiser3/4, XFS, JFS, and several more.

GPLv3: Free or Commercial?

Filed under
OSS

When I think about technology companies that are major backers of the open source movement, I tend to think about Google and IBM.

The two companies publicly support open source efforts and both have built products that take advantage of open source software. Yet Google and IBM tend to prefer open source licenses other than GPL.

Why is that?

Open source needs lobbyists

Filed under
OSS

A decade ago, when the Web had just been spun, the computer industry learned the hard way how it needed lobbyists to keep competition alive.

Chief among these companies was Microsoft, which stepped up to the plate for the industry, hired lots of warm bodies (often with fine minds) and fought even the mighty telephone industry to a draw.

Red Hat Teams with UNC to Bring Open Source Philosophy to Campus

Filed under
Linux

Red Hat, Inc. (NYSE: RHT - News), the world's leading provider of open source solutions, today announced that the company would work with the University of North Carolina system and the North Carolina Research Campus to advance the adoption of open source philosophies of standards and collaboration in biotechnology, bioinformatics, public policy and healthcare research.

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