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Saturday, 24 Feb 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Mandriva One 2008.1 (spring), I want to like it…

Filed under
MDV

izanbardprince.wordpress: I downloaded a Mandriva One 2008.1 disc to try out the other day, and tried it on three systems. What I found is that while Mandriva is definitely a good distribution from many points, it still has some pretty damning problems that rule it out for new users.

Linux Mint Server hacked

Filed under
Linux
Security
Web

linuxmint.com/blog: Our server was hacked and code was injected into it to make connections on our behalf to pinoc.org and download a trojan called JS/Tenia.d

Santa Cruz and its "Linux Strategy" Back in the 1990s

Filed under
Linux

groklaw.net: Here are some more screenshots for you, showing the real Santa Cruz Operation relationship with Linux before the modern day SCO Group began suing the world and its dog. Back in the late 1990s, Santa Cruz had what it called its "Linux strategy". It included both money and support to help Linux succeed.

Intux 1.0 is a Toxicant for all the Bad Reasons

Filed under
Linux

pclinuxos2007.blogspot: Rupesh Shah, the project leader of Intux, had posted a thread in the intux forum that read "The release of intux OS v1.0 will be uploaded very soon. The developers of intuxOS are trying their best to meet the expectations of community and won't deliver anything less than the best." But this outrageous proclamation has been proven a lie outright.

Debian Turns 15 Years Old

Filed under
Linux

efytimes.com: Despite being only 15 years old, Debian is more mature than any of the other operating systems. And it is available for free to download and use.

few howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Howto: Find matches for udev rules

  • Tutorial: Conditions in bash scripting (if statements)
  • How to Boot Linux CDs on an Old Computer
  • Create a Shortcut or Hotkey to Mute the Speakers on Linux

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • The top 4 internet flame wars about free software

  • The DNS Bug: Why You Should Care
  • The Stockholm airport to sponsor Ubuntu Brainstorm
  • CAOS Theory Podcast 2008.08.15
  • The Awful KHelpCenter
  • Mandriva One running on VirtualBox
  • How to backup Firefox 3 settings under Linux
  • Video Comes to KDE://Radio from the Akademy Boat Trip
  • The biggest open source threat to Microsoft
  • Testing Firefox QT
  • Recover Corrupted Partition From A Bad Superblock
  • See last partial lunar eclipse of 2008 on August 16-17
  • Fix: Ubuntu .dmrc permissions error on login
  • ESC Boston giving away free Beagles
  • Linux and Unix Admin Humor - The Web Site Is Down!
  • The Most Powerful Linux Utility
  • Commercial Apps For Consumer Linux: D.O.A.?
  • Linux to Windows and back again with Samba

Why the linux idea of open source is "Correct"

Open source is a term that we have all heard. Open source simply means that the complete code of a program is available to anyone and can be modified in any way pleased. Why is this correct? Very simple. Have you you ever played the game of "Secret"; A game were a secret is whispered from person to person and the secret has to come back the same way it was originally to the person who started it.

Balancing Respect and Diversity

Filed under
Linux

jonobacon.org: Historically, the relationship between Debian and Ubuntu has been strained at times. There are various technical and social reasons behind this discomfort in our relationship, and while there is still work to be done to ensure we are working effectively together, the relationship has most certainly improved in recent years.

Extract Archives on Right-Click in KDE 4

Filed under
Software

fosswire.com: In KDE 3, extracting archives, such as zip and tar files, is pretty simple. You just find the relevant file in Konqueror or Dolphin, right-click it and choose Extract for a list of extraction options. For some reason, that functionality hasn’t been copied over to KDE 4.

The End Of the OS As We Know It

Filed under
Software

linux-foundation.org/weblogs: So the bloggers over at ZDNet have once again proclaimed the end of the operating system. Is the OS going away if people primarily use applications via a browser? I use hosted applications via a browser. I use Word Press, Flickr, Google Apps, Gmail, online money management, online banking and so on.

Also: The Future of Computing is the Yugo

BBC Opens Up - Or Does it?

Filed under
Software

ostatic.com: The BBC's iPlayer site has been a target of open source community ire since it started. Originally delivering content via Microsoft DRM-protected technologies, a recent announcement from the BBC's Erik Huggers appears to offer some promise of relief:

10 FAQ After one Week on Linux

Filed under
Linux

168hours.wordpress: There are many cases when after looking at some of the FAQ on the web you ask yourself: “Are they for real? Who asks those questions anyway?” On the other hand there are many really helpful FAQ.

China takes lead in Linux education

Filed under
Linux

linux.com: Since the Chinese government began supporting domestic open source communities in 2005, hundreds of thousands of young people in the world's most populous country have become a part of the open source world.

Mandriva 2009 Beta 1 & KDE 4.1 - A Brief Report

Mandriva released the 2009 Beta 1 iso's on July 29th. I downloaded the i586 version then. Since then, hundreds of software updates, patches, and fixes have been placed into Mandriva's "Cooker" repositories, Cooker being Mandriva's name for it's development branch.

How are things shaping up for the Mandriva 2009 release? And how's KDE 4.1 working on this new release?

Dogs hide bones, Firefox hides useful tricks

Filed under
Moz/FF

downloadsquad.com: Firefox is one of those applications that's so hard to write about, because there may be little tricks and shortcuts I've been using for some time, and someone will discover one and say, "Hey, that rocks! Why didn't anyone tell me?"

Interesting Improvements In GNOME 2.24

Filed under
Software

phoronix.com: Earlier this year prior to the release of GNOME 2.22 we had shared eight interesting improvements in GNOME 2.22. Now with the official GNOME 2.24 release due out next month, this time around we're sharing a few of the interesting highlights for this GNOME update.

Pixar's rendering software - big on Linux servers, not Mac

Filed under
Software

blogs.computerworld: A reader of my recent story on Pixar announcing that its popular RenderMan Pro Server software would start to support Windows clusters questioned why I hadn't noted whether or not RenderMan already ran on Mac and Linux server clusters, known as 'render farms' in the animation biz.

Dell's Latitude-On instant OS detailed, screenshooted

Filed under
Linux

engadget.com: Seems the act of waking a sleeping laptop to a full-blown OS is no longer in vogue. We're not sure when this happened though we're pretty sure that ASUS' decision to embed SplashTop into its P5E3 mobo had something to do with it. The benefit, of course, is an extension of battery life to days instead of hours.

Test Driving Zenwalk 5.2 Beta Gnome Edition

Filed under
Linux

softpedia.com: This was my first ever adventure with a Slakware-based GNU/Linux distribution so I cannot say it has been an easy, effortless task, but that's probably just my lack of experience, because, after I finished the installation and testing of Zenwalk 5.2 Beta Gnome edition, it all made much more sense.

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More in Tux Machines

FATHOM releases Crystallon

  • FATHOM releases Crystallon, an open-source software for lattice-based design
    Lattice structures are integral to 3D printed designs, and Aaron Porterfield, an industrial designer at additive manufacturing service bureau FATHOM, has developed Crystallon, an open source project for shaping them into structures.
  • FATHOM Introduces Open Source Software Project for Generating 3D Lattice Structures
    California-based FATHOM, which expanded its on-site managed services and announced important partnerships with Stratasys and Desktop Metal last year, is introducing a fascinating new open source project called Crystallon, which uses Rhino and Grasshopper3D to create lattice structures. FATHOM industrial designer Aaron Porterfield, also an Instructables member, developed the project as an alternative to designing lattices with commercially available software. He joined the company’s design and engineering team three years ago, and is often a featured speaker for its Design for Additive Manufacturing (DfAM) Training Program – and as the project developer, who better to explain the Crystallon project?

Kernel and Graphics: Machine Learning, Mesa, Wayland/Mir, AMDGPU

  • AI-Powered / Machine Learning Linux Performance Tuning Is Now A Thing
    A year and a half ago I wrote about a start-up working on dynamically-tuned, self-optimizing Linux servers. That company is now known as Concertio and they just launched their "AI powered" toolkit for IT administrators and performance engineers to optimize their server performance. Concertio Optimizer Studio is their product making use of machine learning that aims to optimize Linux systems with Intel CPUs for peak performance by scoping out the impact of hundreds of different tunables for trying to deliver an optimal configuration package for that workload on that hardware.
  • Pengutronix Gets Open-Source 3D Working On MX8M/GC7000 Hardware
    We've known that Pengutronix developers had been working on i.MX8M / GC7000 graphics support within their Etnaviv open-source driver stack from initial patches posted in January. Those patches back at the start of the year were for the DRM kernel driver, but it turns out they have already got basic 3D acceleration working.
  • SDL Now Disables Mir By Default In Favor Of Wayland Compatibility
    With Mir focusing on Wayland compatibility now, toolkits and other software making direct use of Mir's APIs can begin making use of any existing Wayland back-end instead. GTK4 drops the Mir back-end since the same can be achieved with the Wayland compatibility and now SDL is now making a similar move.
  • Mesa 18.1 Receives OpenGL 3.1 With ARB_compatibility For Gallium3D Drivers
    Going back to last October, Marek of AMD's open-source driver team has been working on ARB_compatibility support for Mesa with a focus on RadeonSI/Gallium3D. Today that work was finally merged. The ARB_compatibility support allows use of deprecated/removed features of OpenGL by newer versions of the specification. ARB_compatibility is particularly useful for OpenGL workstation users where there are many applications notorious for relying upon compatibility contexts / deprecated GL functionality. But ARB_compatibility is also used by a handful of Linux games too.
  • AMDGPU In Linux 4.17 Exposes WattMan Features, GPU Voltage/Power Via Hwmon
    AMD's Alex Deucher today sent in the first pull request to DRM-Next of AMDGPU (and Radeon) DRM driver feature material that will in turn be merged with the Linux 4.17 kernel down the road. There's some fun features for AMDGPU users coming with this next kernel! First up, Linux is finally getting some WattMan-like functionality after it's been available via the Windows Radeon Software driver since 2016. WattMan allows for more fine-tuning of GPU clocks, voltages, and more for trying to maximize the power efficiency. See the aforelinked article for details but currently without any GUI panel for tweaking all of the driver tunables, this WattMan-like support needs to be toggled from the command-line.

Wine and Ganes: World of Warcraft, Farm Together, Madcap Castle, Cityglitch

Security Leftovers