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Thursday, 26 Apr 18 - Tux Machines is a community-driven public service/news site which has been around for over a decade and primarily focuses on GNU/LinuxSubscribe now Syndicate content

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Quick Roundup

Type Title Author Replies Last Postsort icon
Story The Companies That Support Linux: IIX Inc. Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 3:55pm
Story Good news, Some Samsung 2014 TVs to be upgradeable to Tizen Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 3:02pm
Story Wearing LG's webOS smartwatch made me happy Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 2:59pm
Story Linuxy Hopes and Dreams for an Inferno-Free 2015 Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 2:24pm
Story diff -u: What's New in Kernel Development Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 2:15pm
Story Harman brings Linux based IVI to entry-level cars Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 2:14pm
Story Is SteamOS Ready for the Possible Steam Machines Launch in March? Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 1:15pm
Story OSS Leftovers Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 1:13pm
Story Marvell donation accelerates Debian ARM package builds Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 10:22am
Story A Device Blind Users Will Love Roy Schestowitz 09/01/2015 - 9:14am

today's leftovers

Filed under
News
  • Non-Geeks Installing Ubuntu: Why Linux Needs Better Wireless Support

  • Interview: Fedora 10’s Better Startup
  • Mozilla's Privacy UI
  • Open Source Smackdown - live or die in the new economy, it all has an OSS angle now
  • Linux applications gain new developers on Windows and OS X
  • VMware users await Windows-free VirtualCenter, VI Client
  • Alleged Israeli GPL violation settled out of court
  • How to disable SSH host key checking
  • Mandriva Linux One 2009 - Post Installation Impressions
  • Linux May Be Worth $10.8 Billion, but Is It for Everyone?
  • Shuttleworth will burn fortune for Ubuntu
  • Opera scrambles to quash zero-day bug in freshly-patched browser
  • A look at OpenOffice Community Innovation Award winners
  • Neil Gaiman: Piracy vs. Obscurity
  • Open source begins to beat brand in business
  • Amarok October Updates
  • New Netflix player uses Silverlight to reach Mac, Linux
  • My children are already being sucked into the open-source vortex

KDE and the apps that keep the dragon hot

Filed under
KDE

bushweed.blogspot: People often question why i use Linux as a primary OS at home. In fact it is the only OS i use at home, although i have a Windows XP CD somewhere. Other than the obvious security features, and stability to the core, there are certain apps which i class as my killer apps.

Mom-compatible Kubuntu Intrepid with KDE 4

Filed under
Ubuntu

amarok.kde.org/blog: A few weeks ago, our neighbor, a fifty-something housewife, asked us to have a look at her rather new computer making strange noises and refusing to boot. Of course, this was the ideal moment to try what we first thought to end up with a dual boot:

Kernel log: 2.6.28-rc1 released, new graphics and camera drivers

Filed under
Linux

heise-online.co.uk: The maintainers of the stable kernel have released versions 2.6.25.19, 2.6.26.7 and 2.6.27.3, as expected. Apart from bug fixes and minor improvements, all of the versions also offer a patch for CVE-2008-3831, the security hole in the DRI code for recent Intel graphics chipsets.

SimplyMEPIS 8.0 Beta 4 Adds New Broadcom Support

Filed under
Linux

mepis.org: ISO files of the fourth beta of SimplyMEPIS 8.0 are available for 32 and 64 bit processors. In this release the kernel has been updated to upstream version 2.6.27.3 and the Broadcom wl driver is now avilable for wireless N cards.

Why I Am Not A "Linux Advocate"

Filed under
Linux

penguinpetes.com: At first, you might mistake me for a "Linux advocate". I'm running a site about Free and Open Source Software (FOSS), of which Linux is counted as an example. I certainly bring up Linux and the programs that run on it a lot.

BoycottNovell: just another website pushing a point of view

Filed under
Web

itwire.com: Four days ago, an article purporting to analyse the raison d'etre behind the website BoycottNovell.com appeared on the linux.com site. The author, Bruce Byfield, who styles himself as a "computer journalist", however, failed to tell his reading public that the piece was just a thinly disguised and veiled attack on the person who runs the BoycottNovell site.

some howtos:

Filed under
HowTos
  • Vim Cheatsheet

  • How to mount Linux filesystem under FreeBSD
  • 5 Simple APT Tricks for Debian and Ubuntu
  • Tuning the Linux file system Ext3
  • Recover a corrupted signatures rpm database
  • OpenOffice.org Tip - Disable the ‘Help Agent’ Popup
  • Recover your lost Root Password openSUSE
  • Forwarding X over SSH in 3 simple steps
  • Teach an old shell new tricks with BashDiff
  • Using dmidecode to find out what memory chips you have
  • Tip: Bash Shortcuts
  • Easy way to insert nonbreaking hyphen, etc. in OOo Writer
  • Where to search Ubuntu Personal Package Archives (PPA)
  • Copying a Filesystem between Computers

How Linux Mint proved to be unacceptable for a reliable usage

Filed under
Linux

beranger.org: How would you call a distro that includes some of the specific bits needed to run the desktop only on the installation CD, but not as packages in the online repos? And it's more than that — read on.

Gentoo on a Asus EEE PC 901

Filed under
Linux

Heretic and Hexen goes GNU GPLv2

Filed under
OSS
Gaming

linux-gamers.net: The source code for Heretic and Hexen has been re-released under the GNU General Public License, and is now available from Sourceforge. This release will allow GPL Doom source ports to freely integrate support for Heretic and Hexen.

My opinion of Mono

Filed under
Software

dev-loki.blogspot: As it seems like everyone has to voice her opinion on Mono, I'll do as well. First of all, I don't like C# as a programming language. And I think that Anders Hejlsberg is wrong on many things. N

'Lame Duck challenge' met, so software is free

Filed under
Software

PR: The catastrophic cratering of the global economy, falling gas prices and President George W. Bush's recent executive activities have indirectly prompted Saint Paul gadfly software developers CodeWeavers, Inc., to provide free software for every American on Oct. 28, company officials reluctantly announced today.

11 secrets for lazy Linux cluster admins

Filed under
Linux

Discover how to reduce Linux cluster admin effort, regardless of number of nodes.

Netbooks: The Linux Trojan Horse

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

techradar.com: For better or worse, Linux has always had a reputation as being the geeks' OS. With netbooks, this isn't the case. Neither the Windows nor Linux systems on the market are really being sold as computers as such, but a handy device that people buy for specific functions.

Also: How many distros can a healthy netbook market stand?

Torvalds: Real quality means taking it personally

Filed under
Linux

linuxdevices.com: The Linux Foundation (LF) has posted a ten-minute video interview with kernel coordinator Linus Torvalds. Held during the Linux Foundation's recent Linux Kernel Summit, the interview reveals the Linux founder speaking out on issues ranging from kernel/userland interactions to why Linux has so many interfaces.

ubuntu, ubuntu, ubuntu

Filed under
Ubuntu
  • Shuttleworth: "I don't think anyone can make money from the Linux desktop."

  • Review: Ubuntu 8.10, 3G tethering works very well
  • Can the New Ubuntu Save You Money?
  • Canonical is not cash flow positive
  • Notes from Setting Up Ubuntu Server on Linode
  • Official 8.10 release news: where they messed up
  • Seen on campus: 2 Ubuntu Laptop Success Stories
  • Canonical may need 3-5 more years of funding
  • Ubuntu 8.10 due Thursday; profitability not so fast
  • Mark Shuttleworth and the Grand Linux Vision
  • New Ubuntu Initiatives
  • Help us test the Kubuntu 8.10 Candidate CDs

Could a Linux Gaming Console Ever Work?

Filed under
Linux
Hardware

ostatic.com: A few days ago, Kristin covered Envizions Computer Entertainment's announcement that it will deliver its EVO Linux-based gaming console on November 18th. She predicted that the announcment would probably stoke the long-standing fire surrounding whether Linux can ever be a viable gaming platform, and indeed it did.

Results of the 1st openSUSE Board Election

Filed under
SUSE

opensuse.org: So the polls are closed now and all votes have been accounted for and confirmed valid, and we are now proud to announce the election results!

John Galt is dead or Linus shrugs

Filed under
Linux

blogs.zdnet: John Galt is the lead character in Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged. Galt represents Rand’s ideal of objectivism, of free market absolutism and rule by those few who dominate the market. Linus is the anti-Galt.

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More in Tux Machines

Software: LibreNMS, Pidgin, Wireshark and More

  • Featured Network Monitoring Tool for Linux
    LibreNMS is an open source, powerful and feature-rich auto-discovering PHP based network monitoring system which uses the SNMP protocol. It supports a broad range of operating systems including Linux, FreeBSD, as well as network devices including Cisco, Juniper, Brocade, Foundry, HP and many more.
  • Get started with Pidgin: An open source replacement for Skype
    Technology is at an interesting crossroads, where Linux rules the server landscape but Microsoft rules the enterprise desktop. Office 365, Skype for Business, Microsoft Teams, OneDrive, Outlook... the list goes on of Microsoft software and services that dominate the enterprise workspace. What if you could replace that proprietary software with free and open source applications and make them work with an Office 365 backend you have no choice but to use? Buckle up, because that is exactly what we are going to do with Pidgin, an open source replacement for Skype.
  • Wireshark, World’s Most Popular Network Protocol Analyzer, Gets Major Release
    Wireshark, world’s most popular open-source network protocol analyzer, has been updated to a new stable series, versioned 2.6, a major update that adds numerous new features and improvements, as well as support for new protocols. A lot of user interface improvements have been made since Wireshark 2.5, and Wireshark 2.6 appears to be the last release that will support the legacy GTK+ graphical user interface, as the development team announced it wouldn't be supported in the next major series, Wireshark 3.0. New features in Wireshark 2.6 include support for HTTP Request sequences, support for MaxMind DB files, Microsoft Network Monitor capture file support, as well as LoRaTap capture interface support. The IP map feature was removed, as well as support for the GeoIP and GeoLite Legacy databases.
  • A look at terminal emulators, part 2
    A comparison of the feature sets for a handful of terminal emulators was the subject of a recent article; here I follow that up by examining the performance of those terminals. This might seem like a lesser concern, but as it turns out, terminals exhibit surprisingly high latency for such fundamental programs. I also examine what is traditionally considered "speed" (but is really scroll bandwidth) and memory usage, with the understanding that the impact of memory use is less than it was when I looked at this a decade ago (in French).
  • Counting beans—and more—with Beancount
    It is normally the grumpy editor's job to look at accounting software; he does so with an eye toward getting the business off of the proprietary QuickBooks application and moving to something free. It may be that Beancount deserves a look of that nature before too long but, in the meantime, a slightly less grumpy editor has been messing with this text-based accounting tool for a variety of much smaller projects. It is an interesting system, with a lot of capabilities, but its reliance on hand-rolling for various pieces may scare some folks off.
  • Firefox release speed wins
    Sylvestre wrote about how we were able to ship new releases for Nightly, Beta, Release and ESR versions of Firefox for Desktop and Android in less than a day in response to the pwn2own contest. People commented on how much faster the Beta and Release releases were compared to the ESR release, so I wanted to dive into the releases on the different branches to understand if this really was the case, and if so, why? [..] We can see that Firefox 59 and 60.0b4 were significantly faster to run than ESR 52 was! What's behind this speedup?
  • LibreOffice 6.1 Alpha 1 Is Ready To Roll For Advancing The Open-Source Office
    LibreOffice 6.1 Alpha 1 was tagged overnight as the first development release towards this next updated open-source office suite release succeeding the big LibreOffice 6.0. LibreOffice 6.1.0 is set to be released by the middle of August and for that to happen the alpha release has now been hit followed by the beta release this time next month, and the release candidates to come through the month of July. The feature freeze and branching occurs at next month's beta stage while the hard code freeze is expected for the middle of July.

today's howtos

GNOME Development and Events

  • Dependencies with code generators got a lot smoother with Meson 0.46.0
    Most dependencies are libraries. Almost all build systems can find dependency libraries from the system using e.g. pkg-config. Some can build dependencies from source. Some, like Meson, can do both and toggle between them transparently. Library dependencies might not be a fully solved problem but we as a community have a fairly good grasp on how to make them work. However there are some dependencies where this is not enough. A fairly common case is to have a dependency that has some sort of a source code generator. Examples of this include Protocol Buffers, Qt's moc and glib-mkenums and other tools that come with Glib. The common solution is to look up these binaries from PATH. This works for dependencies that are already installed on the system but fails quite badly when the dependencies are built as subprojects. Bootstrapping is also a bit trickier because you may need to write custom code in the project that provides the executables.
  • Expanding Amtk to support GUIs with headerbar
    I initially created the Amtk library to still be able to conveniently create a traditional UI without using deprecated GTK+ APIs, for GNOME LaTeX. But when working on Devhelp (which has a modern UI with a GtkHeaderBar) I noticed that some pieces of information were duplicated in order to create the menus and the GtkShortcutsWindow.
  • GLib/GIO async operations and Rust futures + async/await
    Unfortunately I was not able to attend the Rust+GNOME hackfest in Madrid last week, but I could at least spend some of my work time at Centricular on implementing one of the things I wanted to work on during the hackfest. The other one, more closely related to the gnome-class work, will be the topic of a future blog post once I actually have something to show.
  • Introducing Chafa
  • Infra Hackfest
  • Madrid GNOME+Rust Hackfest, part 3 (conclusion)
    I'm back home now, jetlagged but very happy that gnome-class is in a much more advanced a state than it was before the hackfest. I'm very thankful that practically everyone worked on it!
  • GNOME loves Rust Hackfest in Madrid
    The last week was the GNOME loves Rust hackfest in Madrid. I was there, only for the first two days, but was a great experience to meet the people working with Rust in GNOME a great community with a lot of talented people.
  • GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 Now Works With Elogind, Allows For Wayland On Non-Systemd Distros
    GNOME Mutter 3.29.1 has been released as the first development snapshot of this window manager / compositor in the trek towards GNOME 3.30. Mutter 3.29.1 overshot the GNOME 3.29.1 release by one week, but for being a first development release of a new cycle has some pretty interesting changes. Among the work found in Mutter 3.29.1 includes: - Mutter can now be built with elogind. That is the systemd-logind as its own standalone package. This in turn allows using Mutter with its native Wayland back-end on Linux distributions using init systems besides systemd.

KDE: Plasma Widgets, PIM Update and More

  • 3 Students Accepted for Google Summer of Code 2018
    Since 2006, we have had the opportunity for Google to sponsor students to help out with Krita. For 2018 we have 3 talented students working over the summer. Over the next few months they will be getting more familiar with the Krita code base and working on their projects. They will be blogging about their experience and what they are learning along the way. We will be sure to share any progress or information along the way. Here is a summary of their projects and what they hope to achieve.
  • Plasma widgets – Beltway Bandit Unlimited
    The concept of addons is an interesting one. At some point over the past decade or two, companies developing (successful) software realized that bundling an ever-growing code base into their products in order to meet the spiraling tower of requests from their users would result in unsustainable bloat and complexity that would not warrant the new functionality. And so, the idea of addons was born. Addons come in many flavors – extensions, plugins, applets, scripts, and of course, widgets. A large number of popular programs have incorporated them, and when done with style, the extra functionality becomes as important as the core application itself. Examples that come to mind: Firefox, Notepad++, VLC, Blender. And then, there’s the Plasma desktop environment. Since inception, KDE has prided itself on offering complete solutions, and the last incarnation of its UI framework is no different. Which begs the question, what, how and why would anyone need Plasma widgets? We explore. [...] Conclusion A good mean needs no seasoning, indeed. And Plasma is a proof of that, with the widgets the best example. Remarkably, this desktop environment manages to juggle the million different usage needs and create a balanced compromise that offers pretty much everything without over-simplifying the usage in any particular category. It’s a really amazing achievement, because normally, the sum of all requests is a boring, useless muddle. Plasma’s default showing is rich, layered, complex yet accessible, and consistent. And that means it does not really need any widgets. This shows. The extras are largely redundant, with some brilliant occasional usage models here and there, but nothing drastic or critical that you don’t get out of the box. This makes Plasma different from most other addons-blessed frameworks, as they do significantly benefit from the extras, and in some cases, the extensions and plugins are critical in supplementing the missing basics. And so, if you wonder, whether you’ll embark on a wonderful journey of discovery and fun with Plasma widgets, the answer is no. Plasma offers 99% of everything you may need right there, and the extras are more to keep people busy rather than give you anything cardinal. After all, if it’s missing, it should be an integral part of the desktop environment, and the KDE folks know this. So if you’re disappointed with this article, don’t be. It means the baseline is solid, and that’s where you journey of wonders and adventure should and will be focused. 
  • My KDE PIM Update
    This blog post is long overdue, but now that I’m back home from the KDE PIM Sprint in Toulouse, which took place last weekend, there’s some more news to report.
  • KDAB at QtDay 2018
    QtDay is the yearly Italian conference about Qt and Qt-related technologies. Its 2018 edition (the seventh so far!) will be once more in the beautiful city of Florence, on May 23 and 24. And, once more, KDAB will be there.
  • Google Summer of Code 2018 with KDE
    It’s been 2 days since the GSoC accepted student list was announced and I’m still getting goosebumps thinking about the moment I saw my name on the website. I started contributing to open source after attending a GSoC session in our college by one of our senior and a previous GSoC student with KDE: Aroonav Mishra. I was very inspired by the program and that defined the turning point of my life. [...] Then I came across GCompris and it caught my eye. I started contributing to it and the mentors are really very helpful and supportive. They always guided me whenever I needed any help  or was stuck at anything. Under their guidance, I learnt many things during the period of my contributions. I had never thought I would get this far.